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Bartram S Garden

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NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maitreyi Roy, a senior vice president at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, uses buzzwords from the nonprofit world a lot, as in: "If you don't have usership, you won't have stewardship. " But as she walks the mossy paths at Bartram's Garden, where she'll become the new executive director Thursday, a simpler expression of that sentiment tumbles out. "We need people to fall in love with this place," she says. Roy, 49, is clearly besotted. Already familiar with the story of John Bartram, the nation's first botanist, she was drawn deeper into his legacy two years ago. With some other partners, PHS was working with Bartram's to set up a new greenhouse and a 3.5-acre organic farm on a former ball field and tennis court on its grounds.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the Schuylkill's west bank, Bartram's Garden offers evocative views of Philadelphia in all its glory and grit. Standing in scruffy grass at the water's edge, you can see Center City skyscrapers stretch toward the clouds, while farther south, massive oil-storage tanks loom like metallic moons. Not many people get to see the city this way, but that may be about to change. Mayor Nutter and Parks Department officials are proposing a 1.1-mile trail to be known as Bartram's Mile that would link the east side of the river to the west and continue on that side of the Schuylkill.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trees are like family at Bartram's Garden. You'll hear affectionate talk of "the ginkgo" or "the cedar," and everyone knows exactly which tree you mean. So, in the middle of Thursday's violent thunderstorm, when head custodian Bill Butler rushed into the office and blurted out, "The yellowwood is down," everyone gasped, then fell silent. This two-century-old favorite had just been struck by lightning. "It's one of those things you hear about and know is true, but you don't want to believe it," said Louise Turan, executive director of the garden, who described her staff as "heartbroken.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010
Top Regional Attractions Academy of Natural Sciences 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-299-1000. www.ansp.org . Butterflies!. $2 fee in addition to admission. Dinosaur Hall. Naturalist Shows. 5/21. Got Milk? Milk Moustache Mobile Tour. 5/21. Safari Overnights. $35; $40 children. 5/22. Sun Fun Family Workshop. $25 per adult/child pair; $5 additional adult or child. 5/22. 10:30-12 pm. Family Safari Overnight: Survivor. $35; $40 children. 5/22. $12; $10 seniors, students, military, children 3-12; free for children under 3. 10 am-4:30 pm Mon.-Fri.
NEWS
February 19, 2004
AMERICA's first botanical garden, Bartram's Garden, is trying very hard to keep a nasty growth from encroaching on its serene 45-acre site on the Schuylkill River. This hidden park gem in Southwest Philadelphia, part of the Fairmount Park system, is not battling a choking weed or a rare botanical disease. The park is fighting a construction waste recycling business that wants to locate next door, although they're also fighting something that smells even worse: a behind-closed-doors process that could favor the politically connected and leave out those most affected by this.
LIVING
February 11, 1996 | By Olivia E. Lehman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sometimes frozen soil serves as a boon for gardeners. During three seasons of the year, they see the land up close, with their backs bent. With winter comes the chance to stand up straight and take in the long view. What better place to do that than at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's 1996 Flower Show? This year's show, the first to be held in the Convention Center, promises to be an extravaganza. Everything about the 1996 show, which opens Feb. 25, will be sizable - the exhibit halls, the number of educational workshops, the available seating, and not least, the theme itself, "This Land Is Your Land . . . Philadelphia in Flower.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
You know what they say: As you go through life, take time to smell the flowers. And there is no time better than right now. Philadelphia's plentiful public gardens are at their peak in late April and May. So get ready to visit now. William M. Klein will help you. Klein, who was director of Morris Arboretum from 1977 to 1991, has written a guide to local gardens designed for weekend travelers and gardeners alike. "Gardens of Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley" (Temple University Press/ $ 29.95)
NEWS
September 28, 1995 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The neighborhood folks of Philadelphia - young and old, weak and strong - have just gained a half-million bucks to build green refuges in the midst of city life. Twenty-one grass-roots groups were awarded the resources yesterday to plant trees and gardens, tend city streams and help young Philadelphians learn about nature in their urban environment. Mayor Rendell presented the Philadelphia Urban Resources Partnership grants yesterday to the winning projects, which ranged from children's environmental camps to quiet gardens for the elderly and disabled.
REAL_ESTATE
September 30, 1990 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
You've haunted auctions and salvage houses for windows and weathervanes, pored over paint catalogues to find just the right shade for the porch. But how does your garden grow? Few old-house enthusiasts can confine their enthusiasm to the house. "There is a constant impulse to transform nature into something we can understand," says William M. Klein, director of the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, in Chestnut Hill. "We garden because we can't understand nature.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dallas Green, who pitched for the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1960s, is now pitching Philadelphia-area gardens. The manager of the 1980 world-champion Phillies has agreed to be official spokesman of the Garden Passport, a 64-page guidebook to 14 area gardens, arboretums and historic homes. Green grew up in Delaware and lives on a 60-acre farm in West Grove, Chester County. He and his wife, Sylvia, appeared Wednesday at the Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill at a news conference announcing the project.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012
No need to be shut in during the winter when there are so many gardens and nature centers where your family can enjoy the outdoors while keeping fit and active. Get out and explore! 1 BARTRAM'S GARDEN One of the nation's oldest botanical gardens has 45 acres filled with recreational activities. Admission for some exhibits. 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard, 215-729-5281, bartramsgarden.org. 2 SCHUYLKILL ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER Learn about and experience nature at this preserve on the banks of the Schuylkill River.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the Schuylkill's west bank, Bartram's Garden offers evocative views of Philadelphia in all its glory and grit. Standing in scruffy grass at the water's edge, you can see Center City skyscrapers stretch toward the clouds, while farther south, massive oil-storage tanks loom like metallic moons. Not many people get to see the city this way, but that may be about to change. Mayor Nutter and Parks Department officials are proposing a 1.1-mile trail to be known as Bartram's Mile that would link the east side of the river to the west and continue on that side of the Schuylkill.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maitreyi Roy, a senior vice president at the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, uses buzzwords from the nonprofit world a lot, as in: "If you don't have usership, you won't have stewardship. " But as she walks the mossy paths at Bartram's Garden, where she'll become the new executive director Thursday, a simpler expression of that sentiment tumbles out. "We need people to fall in love with this place," she says. Roy, 49, is clearly besotted. Already familiar with the story of John Bartram, the nation's first botanist, she was drawn deeper into his legacy two years ago. With some other partners, PHS was working with Bartram's to set up a new greenhouse and a 3.5-acre organic farm on a former ball field and tennis court on its grounds.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mary Elizabeth "Betts" Torrence Layman, 88, of Wynnewood, a volunteer who typed braille textbooks for the blind, assisted a kindergarten class, and donated time and expertise to garden organizations, died Wednesday, Aug. 15, at home of pulmonary fibrosis. A native of Chester, Ill., she earned a bachelor's degree from DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind., in 1945. The next year she married Daniel M. Layman. The couple lived in Philadelphia and Narberth before moving to Wynnewood in 1960.
NEWS
August 11, 2012
Maitreyi Roy, a top officer of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, has been named executive director of Bartram's Garden by the John Bartram Association, which oversees the city-owned historic house and 45 acres along the Schuylkill in Southwest Philadelphia. Shespent 19 years with the Horticultural Society, most recently as senior vice president for programs and planning. She holds a bachelor of architecture degree from the School of Planning and Architecture in New Delhi and a master's in landscape architecture from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Beth Kephart
One hundred million years ago, according to Loren Eiseley, the great anthropologist and Penn professor, the world was monochrome green. No dahlia, no foxglove, no halo-headed hydrangea, no speckled lily. Continent by continent, flowerless-ness reigned. Dinosaurs dreamed in forest hues. And then, Eiseley writes in How Flowers Changed the World, "just a short time before the close of the Age of Reptiles, there occurred a soundless, violent explosion. " The explosion was of color and fruit, pistils and stamen.
NEWS
June 21, 2011
By George Ball The Delaware Valley can rightfully proclaim itself the capital of American public gardens. The fortunate residents of the region can, by traveling a short distance, find themselves in other worlds. They might visit Longwood's stately formal gardens; tour the fanciful themed gardens of Chanticleer; explore arboretums of the first rank, like the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College; wander Bartram's Garden, where American botany first bloomed; or muse in the serenity of Shofuso, the Japanese house and garden in Fairmount Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Mother's Day of late has devolved into a series of Sunday brunches and big bouquets and tithing to Hallmark for the biggest and most monumental card available. Doesn't Mom deserve more than the cliché, though? Anna Jarvis, the Philadelphia woman who was the spirit behind the modern Mother's Day holiday, wanted the occasion to be more than that - with real celebrations and appropriate personal huzzahs - for Mom. Behold, a few things somewhat off-the-Mommy-track for this year:   Boat trip to Bartram's John Bartram was America's first celebrity botanist.
NEWS
June 26, 2010 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trees are like family at Bartram's Garden. You'll hear affectionate talk of "the ginkgo" or "the cedar," and everyone knows exactly which tree you mean. So, in the middle of Thursday's violent thunderstorm, when head custodian Bill Butler rushed into the office and blurted out, "The yellowwood is down," everyone gasped, then fell silent. This two-century-old favorite had just been struck by lightning. "It's one of those things you hear about and know is true, but you don't want to believe it," said Louise Turan, executive director of the garden, who described her staff as "heartbroken.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2010
Top Regional Attractions Academy of Natural Sciences 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-299-1000. www.ansp.org . Butterflies!. $2 fee in addition to admission. Dinosaur Hall. Naturalist Shows. 5/21. Got Milk? Milk Moustache Mobile Tour. 5/21. Safari Overnights. $35; $40 children. 5/22. Sun Fun Family Workshop. $25 per adult/child pair; $5 additional adult or child. 5/22. 10:30-12 pm. Family Safari Overnight: Survivor. $35; $40 children. 5/22. $12; $10 seniors, students, military, children 3-12; free for children under 3. 10 am-4:30 pm Mon.-Fri.
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