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BUSINESS
May 27, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ERIC MENCHER
TAKING COMMAND of the Philadelphia Naval Station, Capt. Eugene A. Razzetti offers comments at the installation ceremony. Others in the program at the Navy Base yesterday were Capt. Jack B. Austin (left), whom Razzetti succeeds, and Rear Adm. Albert E. Rieder, base commander.
NEWS
June 12, 2007
DUE TO lack of space, I can't write all that's incorrect with Fatimah Ali's op-ed "Who's making money on education?" She says that new school district COO Tom Brady is "scary" because he spent 25 years in the army. But she forgot to mention that Brady was already COO of the 12th-largest school district (165,000 students) - Philadelphia is the 8th largest (172,000 students). Brady rose to the rank of colonel and was a base commander. He has the required education and experience for the job in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Blue Sky, the final film from Tony Richardson, the Oscar-winning English director who died in 1991, is the tale of a nuclear family - in both senses. This study of the fragile relationship between a borderline nymphomaniac, her tolerant but emotionally tortured husband and their two daughters is set in the closed military society of the early '60s, when fear of atomic warfare permeated the national consciousness. As a portrait of the fractious Marshall clan - an Army family accustomed to frequent moves and the unrelenting drabness of base life - Blue Sky offers an intriguing examination of the dynamics that define a marriage and shape its children.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dolly Crayton already had figured out what it would mean yesterday when, standing in the Wrightstown home-furnishing store she helps manage, she watched the congressional vote that yanked basic training from nearby Fort Dix. "I can honestly say I would personally be out of a job," she had said minutes before the cable network began registering Congress' vote on the screen of the $1,000 25-inch television on the top shelf. Minutes later and two miles away, the day's work was over for Helen DeAmicis, who hurried out of the post accounting office, where she has worked for many years.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | By Michael L. Rozansky, Inquirer Staff Writer
A union representing 300 clerks, secretaries, guards and other civilians who work at the Naval Air Development Center in Warminster contends that employees fear they will lose their jobs if they fight efforts to dismantle the base. Bruno J. Sposato, president of Local 1928 of the American Federation of Government Employees, said at a news conference Tuesday that employees feared retribution from base management if they signed petitions to save the base or wrote checks to a fund that hired a lobbyist for the base.
NEWS
March 17, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
The base commander for the Willow Grove Naval Air Station says the Navy will take two years to clean five possible toxic-waste sites at the Horsham Township installation. "Right now, there is no immediate danger," Capt. Thomas H. Hoivik told about 70 people at a luncheon Tuesday sponsored by the Greater Willow Grove Chamber of Commerce. Hoivik said the base's water supply did not appear to be affected by possible contaminants. "It looks OK," he said in response to a question.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Dan Morse and Jeremy Borden, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Two Marines were shot and killed late Thursday at the Officer Candidate School at Marine Corps Base Quantico, and the suspected shooter, also a Marine, fatally shot himself inside a barracks on the base, authorities said. The shooter gunned down a man before seizing a woman and killing her and then himself, officials said. They declined to publicly discuss a possible motive in the attacks, but said the incident was neither a terrorist incident nor an attempt to cause mass casualties.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a cavernous Navy hangar festooned with flags and filled with the music of an Army brass band, hundreds of service members and civilians stood Thursday to witness a ceremony steeped in military tradition. Orders were read and an Air Force brigadier general handed a flag to the new leader of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. The change of command was complete. "Sir, I assume command," said Col. James C. Hodges, now in charge of the nation's only contiguous tri-service base, the largest military installation in New Jersey.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
The Midwestern drawl and reserved disposition of Capt. Curtis J. Winters denote a man who grew up in Oneida, Kansas: population 800 and nary a secret among them. Although he is from a small town, Winters has seen some big-time action since his days as a ROTC midshipman attending the University of Kansas. And that action will pay big dividends tomorrow, when Winters takes over command of the Naval Air Development Center (NADC) during a formal ceremony at the Warminster base.
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NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a cavernous Navy hangar festooned with flags and filled with the music of an Army brass band, hundreds of service members and civilians stood Thursday to witness a ceremony steeped in military tradition. Orders were read and an Air Force brigadier general handed a flag to the new leader of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. The change of command was complete. "Sir, I assume command," said Col. James C. Hodges, now in charge of the nation's only contiguous tri-service base, the largest military installation in New Jersey.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Dan Morse and Jeremy Borden, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Two Marines were shot and killed late Thursday at the Officer Candidate School at Marine Corps Base Quantico, and the suspected shooter, also a Marine, fatally shot himself inside a barracks on the base, authorities said. The shooter gunned down a man before seizing a woman and killing her and then himself, officials said. They declined to publicly discuss a possible motive in the attacks, but said the incident was neither a terrorist incident nor an attempt to cause mass casualties.
NEWS
June 12, 2007
DUE TO lack of space, I can't write all that's incorrect with Fatimah Ali's op-ed "Who's making money on education?" She says that new school district COO Tom Brady is "scary" because he spent 25 years in the army. But she forgot to mention that Brady was already COO of the 12th-largest school district (165,000 students) - Philadelphia is the 8th largest (172,000 students). Brady rose to the rank of colonel and was a base commander. He has the required education and experience for the job in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 15, 2005 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Last month's tsunami swept away Indonesian rebel staging areas for attacks on government forces, but the rebels suffered few casualties and will resume their fight for the independence of Aceh province, a local rebel commander said yesterday. The interview with the commander, who declined to give his name but whose men said he led four regiments totaling 720 fighters, was one of the first inside looks at how the tsunami has affected communities controlled by Free Aceh Movement guerrillas, who have been battling Indonesia's central government since 1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Blue Sky, the final film from Tony Richardson, the Oscar-winning English director who died in 1991, is the tale of a nuclear family - in both senses. This study of the fragile relationship between a borderline nymphomaniac, her tolerant but emotionally tortured husband and their two daughters is set in the closed military society of the early '60s, when fear of atomic warfare permeated the national consciousness. As a portrait of the fractious Marshall clan - an Army family accustomed to frequent moves and the unrelenting drabness of base life - Blue Sky offers an intriguing examination of the dynamics that define a marriage and shape its children.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1994 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Poignant moments are commonplace at the Philadelphia Navy Base these days as work begins in earnest on the somber task of shutting the place down. Taxicab drivers taking people to and from the base reminisce about grandparents, parents, aunts and uncles who worked there, helping the nation fight two wars. The people who work there now also talk softly of their lives there - while getting ready for the first big batch of layoff notices that will come any day now. The 25-year-old John F. Kennedy, the giant aircraft carrier that is the shipyard's last major overhaul project, is not scheduled to steam away until Sept.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | By Michael L. Rozansky, Inquirer Staff Writer
A union representing 300 clerks, secretaries, guards and other civilians who work at the Naval Air Development Center in Warminster contends that employees fear they will lose their jobs if they fight efforts to dismantle the base. Bruno J. Sposato, president of Local 1928 of the American Federation of Government Employees, said at a news conference Tuesday that employees feared retribution from base management if they signed petitions to save the base or wrote checks to a fund that hired a lobbyist for the base.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ERIC MENCHER
TAKING COMMAND of the Philadelphia Naval Station, Capt. Eugene A. Razzetti offers comments at the installation ceremony. Others in the program at the Navy Base yesterday were Capt. Jack B. Austin (left), whom Razzetti succeeds, and Rear Adm. Albert E. Rieder, base commander.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dolly Crayton already had figured out what it would mean yesterday when, standing in the Wrightstown home-furnishing store she helps manage, she watched the congressional vote that yanked basic training from nearby Fort Dix. "I can honestly say I would personally be out of a job," she had said minutes before the cable network began registering Congress' vote on the screen of the $1,000 25-inch television on the top shelf. Minutes later and two miles away, the day's work was over for Helen DeAmicis, who hurried out of the post accounting office, where she has worked for many years.
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