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NEWS
June 19, 1987 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
William R. Shane, the new chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, yesterday failed to persuade the PUC to cut $126.8 million from Philadelphia Electric Co.'s rates because of the shutdown of the Peach Bottom nuclear plant. Shane moved that PE's base rates be cut, but the proposal died when neither of the other two members would second it. The proposal was developed by the PUC staff. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission shut down Peach Bottom on March 31 after control-room operators were found asleep on the job. The NRC's regional administrator has said that the shutdown could last a year.
NEWS
January 5, 2001 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Cash-starved PGW will file for yet another rate hike before the state Public Utility Commission today, this time asking for a $65 million jump in its base rate, an increase that would boost the typical residential bill by 11 percent. And even before the papers were filed in Harrisburg, consumer activists were slamming the Philadelphia Gas Works for poor service, its continuing payment of an annual $18 million dividend to the city and the likely damage it will cause to ratepayers on fixed incomes.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2001 | By Akweli Parker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Struggling to stay financially afloat, the Philadelphia Gas Works is appealing once again to its sometimes adversary, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, for rescue. The city-owned natural gas utility said it expected to ask the PUC today for a $65 million increase in its base rate - the charge customers pay to have gas delivered to their homes. If approved, the increase would raise the bill of a typical residential customer - someone using 1,000 cubic feet of gas - from $88 a month to $98 a month and would take effect in March, PGW spokesman Harvey Clark said.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1995 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You say tom-ay-to. I say tom-ah-toh. You say rate increase. Philadelphia Gas Works says retention of overcollection. The city-owned gas utility, which is attempting to wrench itself from a financial crisis, twisted tongues last week over its proposal to, how shall we say, upwardly adjust customer charges. The utility has been sending signals recently that it wants to withhold about $19 million that it overcharged customers for natural gas last winter. PGW needs the money to avoid a technical default on its debt this summer.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission granted a $39 million rate increase to the Philadelphia Gas Works yesterday, much less than the $65 million the utility had sought. The increase in the base rate, coupled with a gas-cost settlement that took effect this month, will mean a net reduction of $213, or 14 percent, in the average residential customer's annual bill. The base rate pays for operations, maintenance, and other expenses, but not the cost of gas. In August, a PUC judge had recommended a $44 million increase in PGW's base rate.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A judge with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission recommended yesterday that the Philadelphia Gas Works be given a $44 million base rate increase, denying PGW nearly a third of its original request. The recommendation, along with a proposed reduction next month in the price PGW charges customers for natural gas, would mean lower overall gas bills heading into winter, a PGW official said. PGW was seeking a $65 million boost in the base rate, which might have wiped out customer savings from lower natural gas prices.
NEWS
October 24, 1997 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Water rates for 283,000 Philadelphia Suburban Water Co. customers in Chester, Delaware and Montgomery Counties will rise an average of 7 percent today, boosting the average residential bill by $20 per year. The state Public Utility Commission yesterday approved the $9.3 million base rate increase for residential, commercial and industrial customers, the result of a settlement between the company and state Consumer Advocate Irwin A. Popowsky. The company had requested a $17 million increase, or 13.3 percent.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2001 | By Akweli Parker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State regulators agreed yesterday to let the Philadelphia Gas Works raise its gas-cost rate by $133 million, socking the residential customer who uses the average amount of gas with a 30 percent increase in a monthly bill. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission said a PGW residential customer using 10,000 cubic feet of gas a month, considered typical, will pay $136 monthly, up from $105. PGW, which is owned by the city, originally sought a $140 million increase. The increase is retroactive to Jan. 1. PGW officials said that they are sensitive to the effect rate increases have on their customers, but that the increases are a matter of financial survival.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Gas Works wants more money, and this is not the movie "Groundhog Day. " Until last week, the company was seeking $149 million, about $52 million in an interim base rate hike and $97 million more to cover the skyrocketing cost of natural gas. Assuming the state Public Utilities Commission grants the entire request early next month, the hike amounts to a 30 percent increase for the average residential heating customer....
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | by Mark McDonald , Daily News Staff Writer
For the second time in a week, the Philadelphia Gas Works has filed a petition for a rate hike with the state Public Utility Commission. Don't let this blizzard of paper descending on Harrisburg confuse you though: the typical residential homeowner is still looking at a whopping 30 percent increase if PGW has its way. But how the company would collect an estimated $149 million from roughly 525,000 ratepayers would change. And in that change can be seen just how desperate the city-owned utility has become.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry announced Thursday that the state's unemployment rate had dropped in April to 7.5 percent, it was good news. But it frightened Gail E. Carmack, a paralegal who has been laid off since 2009. A good report means that 20 weeks of federally funded extended unemployment benefits - the final 20 weeks of benefits that anyone can receive - will come to an end June 11 unless Pennsylvania legislators act quickly to adopt the federal government's new formula for disbursing the money to the states.
NEWS
December 14, 2010 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
HERE WE GO again. It was roughly a decade ago that Philadelphia-area electric customers were told about a bold, new era of choosing their own utility - with a goal of lower bills, cleaner energy or both - only to see that initial push collapse in the wake of the Enron scandal and rising energy costs. But starting in just 17 days, a new era of electricity choice begins in Philadelphia and its Pennsylvania suburbs, and this time real deregulation is expected to stick. That means savvy customers can save as much as $75 to $90 a year.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a dilapidated farm building in Gloucester County, Owen Pool tugs at his sweat-stained "Got Milk?" cap, stretches out his bad knee, and tries to make sense of the dairy industry. Pool says he's losing money every time he milks a cow, thanks to a bewildering mix of circumstances that includes a U.S. cheese surplus, the decline of consumer demand in China, and the lack of precipitation in Australia last year. "I talk to this economist in D.C., to try and stay on top of things," said the 71-year-old dairy farmer.
NEWS
January 7, 2010 | By DAVE DAVIES, daviesd@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
Late on a Friday afternoon in December, the Philadelphia Gas Works announced that it was seeking a rate increase that would leave customers paying about 6.5 percent more for gas service, about $8.50 a month on the average heating customer's bill. But there's more to the story. PGW is actually seeking a 14 percent boost in the base rate it charges for its own operations, and that comes on top of base-rate increases totaling 33 percent since 2006. There's more than one element to a PGW bill.
NEWS
April 10, 2007 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the Philadelphia Gas Works has its way, its 496,000 customers will be paying at least 9.3 percent more for their basic service by the fall. And that prospect last night brought a cadre of customers, social workers, lawyers and politicians to the final of four Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission public-input hearings. The utility says the increase would bring in about $107 million in additional revenue annually. The rate hike does not include any increases in fuel costs, which could also be an additional cost to customers in the coming months.
NEWS
January 5, 2007 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city's gas utility is like a consumer who's maxed out on credit and needs to raise cash not only to keep making payments, but to pay down debt as well. At a meeting yesterday with the Inquirer Editorial Board, executives of the Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) spelled out why they asked state regulators last month for a $100 million-rate increase. Thomas Knudsen, PGW's chief executive, characterized the rate request as an urgent attempt to gain control over the company's growing debt.
NEWS
December 22, 2006 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Gas Works will ask state regulators today to raise its rates by $100 million a year - its biggest request ever. If approved, this latest rate hike would increase the gas bill for a typical residential customer by $156 a year - equal to about an 8 percent hike. The request comes in the face of recent steps to lower rates due to declining costs for natural gas. Although wholesale gas prices are dropping, the cost of delivering that fuel to homes and businesses - factors that go into the so-called base rate - keeps going up. PGW said it needs to ask consumers to pay more.
NEWS
November 1, 2006
THE DEVIL is indeed in the details. And your recent editorial ("Devil's in the details, not in PGW") got some key details wrong. Here are the facts. The Gas Commission did not "originally endorse PGW's plan" for management bonuses and later "kick up a fuss" after allegedly "realizing PGW had not singled out" the program in the prior year's budget. The lukewarm "endorsement" you cite was actually a staff recommendation that, on review, we rejected. We turned down PGW's 2007 budget request for $500,000 in management bonuses because PGW did not submit clearly articulated, well-defined quantitative goals and criteria for it. This is the norm for private industry "pay for performance" programs.
NEWS
October 10, 2006 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Gas Works is a slow-motion crisis that everyone sees coming - and no one seems capable of stopping. A state authority that monitors Philadelphia's finances recently called the city-owned utility one of the greatest financial threats facing the next mayor. The city's gas commission, too, has warned that PGW's cash cushion is "almost nonexistent. " But when State Rep. Dwight Evans (D., Phila.) sent a letter in July to Gov. Rendell, urging him to release $200 million in state money to help PGW, he was met with silence.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission granted a $39 million rate increase to the Philadelphia Gas Works yesterday, much less than the $65 million the utility had sought. The increase in the base rate, coupled with a gas-cost settlement that took effect this month, will mean a net reduction of $213, or 14 percent, in the average residential customer's annual bill. The base rate pays for operations, maintenance, and other expenses, but not the cost of gas. In August, a PUC judge had recommended a $44 million increase in PGW's base rate.
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