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Basement

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NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
Learning that the Defense Department may have stored away $30 billion worth of things it doesn't need made me feel a lot better about my basement. We don't have anywhere near $30 billion worth of stuff down there. In fact, according to the lowest estimate - that would be my wife's - what we have in our basement has no monetary value at all. She didn't actually prepare a formal estimate with hard numbers; I've put them together by extrapolation from the phrase "a bunch of worthless junk.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Christopher Shea, Special to The Inquirer
A fire in a basement storage room caused the evacuation of 23 apartments at the Forge Gate complex on Snyder Road in Towamencin Township on Wednesday night. Damage was limited to Building D of the five-building complex and was estimated at $20,000. One resident was treated at the scene for minor smoke inhalation. The storage room was "gutted," said Towamencin Fire Chief Christopher Bohmueller. A laundry room in the basement also sustained heavy heat and smoke damage. The seven apartments on the first floor sustained heat damage, Bohmeuller said, and all 23 apartments in the building sustained smoke damage.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
The strange phone calls about a body in a South Philadelphia house started coming in at the Roundhouse about 6:30 last night, Homicide Lt. Joseph Witte said. After the third or fourth call, detectives went to a rowhouse on Cleveland Street near Fitzwater, talked to the tenants who had moved in just a few months ago, and got permission from them and the owner to dig up the cement basement floor. "We dug down about 20 inches before we found the bones," Witte said. The unidentified skeletal remains - possibly those of a woman - were discovered wrapped in a sheet, just where the caller said they would be, Witte said.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By Lara Wozniak, Special to The Inquirer
In a brief meeting Monday, the Lower Merion Planning Commission recommended approving the conversion of a basement to an apartment in the Yorklynne Manor Condominiums at 465-471 City Ave., even though the proposal has yet to win authorization from the Zoning Hearing Board. Commission members John C. Donlevie, William H. Loesche, Davis Pearson and Francis J. Travascio voted in favor of the proposal. James Greenfield, Harry G. Rieger and Eleanor W. Winsor voted against it. A request for permission to expand the number of units on the lot is pending before the zoning board.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone worried about basement flooding might find useful some tips from New Jersey utility PSE&G. Customers of other gas and electric providers should contact their utility company as needed. Peco, which serves Southeastern Pennsylvania, can be reached for non-emergencies at 1-800-494-4000 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday), or for emergencies, including outages, at 1-800-841-4141 round-the-clock. Online reporting, including through mobile devices, is available through www.peco.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
The Warrington Zoning Hearing Board has approved Benjamin Grove's proposal to work out of the basement of his Pickertown Road home. The fire-equipment repairer received an exception Monday night to convert his basement into an office, said township manager Stanley Gawel. The board approved the conversion, 3-0, but limited Grove to paper and telephone work. Grove assured the board that he does all repairs at the fire departments that hire him, Gawel said. The zoning board made short work of the rest of its agenda Monday, continuing two requests for a special exception, Gawel said.
NEWS
February 9, 2007 | By Kathy Stevenson
Winter has finally arrived and many of us are spending a lot more time indoors. In this part of the country, that means migrating down to the basement. Whether your basement is used mainly as a place to store "stuff" or a place to store kids, it likely reveals your family's true personality. Upstairs might be the face we show to the public, but down below the designer kitchen anything goes. The most desirable basements, in my continuing informal survey of how people live, are those maintained by older, retired couples.
NEWS
July 30, 2004 | By Judy Harch
My basement has become a living history museum. Pieces of my life story are scattered among dusty boxes, plastic containers, and shelves laden with the fallout of 40 years of accumulated stuff. The exhibits in this museum have moved to three locations during that time. My basement also happens to be an archive for my children's life stories. It slowly evolved into a storehouse for special toys from days gone by, an assortment of outgrown beds, and books ranging from easy readers purchased at school book fairs to outdated college textbooks that my girls just couldn't part with.
LIVING
December 4, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: We live in a home that is more than 50 years old. It has a cement foundation with a finished wallboard basement. We noticed an earthy smell in the basement. We feel that the smell is coming from the high moisture content of the old cement walls behind the wallboard. We have been advised that to fix the problem, the wallboard would have to be torn down and wire mesh would have to be put up on the walls and more cement and then a special paint be applied. The estimated cost for the wire mesh process alone would be roughly $10,000, not including the demolition and refinishing of the basement.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
It's a sad day in Philadelphia when a firefighter is killed, even though it's accepted that facing death is part of the job. Added to the list of the fallen Tuesday was Joyce Craig-Lewis, 36, who died in the smoky haze of a basement fire inside a West Oak Lane home. She becomes the first female member of the Philadelphia Fire Department to die in the line of duty. An investigation is ongoing to determine how Craig-Lewis became isolated and trapped in the basement. Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer said basement fires are particularly challenging.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, MORGAN ZALOT, DAVID GAMBACORTA & MENSAH DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN THEY are older, and showing their own children photo albums that have far too many blank spaces, Mehki Donte Green and Laylani Lewis will say that their mother died a hero on a soggy, bitterly cold day in Philadelphia. Their mom, veteran Philadelphia Firefighter Joyce Craig-Lewis, lost her life while battling a hellacious blaze in West Oak Lane in the early morning darkness yesterday, earning a heartbreaking place in the city's history as the first female firefighter to die in the line of duty.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
CHRONICLING the recording of new music using long-lost lyrics by Bob Dylan, tonight's Showtime special "Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued" will have its biggest appeal to the boomer-era fans taking in Mr. D's shows at the Academy of Music this weekend. But the target demo could be lowered by the far more "current" artists who took on this time-warping collaborative mission - Marcus Mumford (Mumford and Sons), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Rhiannon Giddens (Carolina Chocolate Drops)
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
DEJA ALVAREZ has lost count of the times she has come to the Criminal Justice Center on Filbert Street. "Oh my God, I can't even remember anymore," she said, before settling on four. Each time, the case against the man accused of stabbing and dismembering her friend Diamond Williams, on July 14, 2013, was continued for one reason or another. Mostly because lawyers and doctors were trying to figure out whether Charles Nolan Sargent was sane enough to stand trial in the brutal slaying of a transgender woman whose grandmother said was born Mark William Woods.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
BASEMENTS, basically by definition, are the ugly and unloved stepchildren of any tiered structure. A damp, dank place to stack cardboard boxes full of ex-lovers' stuff. A resting place for never-used exercise equipment. A sunlight-free ecosystem perfect for the cultivation of cobwebs and dust bunnies. An eminently unsafe hiding place for psychotic clowns armed with blood-stained garden equipment. (Just me?) But none of these subterranean stereotypes, even the totally rational killer-clown one, apply to what lies beneath the Reading Terminal Market, one of Philadelphia's most recognized historical and culinary contributions.
REAL_ESTATE
September 7, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Art is imitating life here. As I write this, I'm waiting for our utility to replace a 1924 steel gas line that was found to be leaking. So the gas is off for a couple of hours, and a three-man crew is digging up the street in front of my house to fix the problem, thanks to a detection unit that roams our street once a year, as required by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities. What happens between visits? Detection is up to you, and the utilities have made it easier.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janet Monge knew for years that the Penn Museum had quite the skeleton in its closet, a box of bones supinely displayed, carefully encased in wax, wrapped in burlap, and positioned on a board. "Somebody took great pains to take a very fragmentary skeleton and bring it here," said Monge, the curator who oversees the physical anthropology section of the museum in University City. "Therefore, it must be important. " There was no catalog card or identifying information. So the skeleton sat obscurely for years in a ground-floor storage room at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jon and Alexis Sherman are expecting their first baby, and after heavy rains earlier this year, they had to hurry to waterproof and finish their basement in advance of the little one's arrival. "We bought the house as our first home, and we didn't want to overstretch ourselves," said Jon Sherman, a filmmaker at two companies in Philadelphia - Video City, of which he is president, and Expo Films, which he co-founded. (Alexis Sherman is assistant director of human resources at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.)
REAL_ESTATE
June 15, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My son and daughter-in-law purchased a twin ranch home with a finished basement in the Northeast in September. The recent heavy rains invaded their home and caused a great deal of damage to the back wall in both the basement and the bedroom above. They called an adjuster, who cut out the damaged walls and removed carpet, and brought in fans and a dehumidifier. All materials were saved for the insurance company to see. The adjuster said he would file the insurance claim for them, and that potential causes of the water intrusion could be the bedroom window and the back patio, put in by a previous owner.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia men received long prison sentences Monday after they pleaded guilty to fatally shooting an 80-year-old man during a burglary at his Southwest Philadelphia home in which they stole a laptop. Common Pleas Court Judge Rose Marie DeFino-Nastasi sentenced Sean Johnson, 20, to 35 to 70 years in prison, and Aaron Pitts, 22, to 20 to 40 years. A jury was about to be chosen Monday for the two men's trial. Instead, the pair pleaded guilty to third-degree murder, burglary, robbery, and related offenses in the May 2012 slaying of Joseph Fleming, 80, of the 6600 block of Yocum Street.
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