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Basement

NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Janet Monge knew for years that the Penn Museum had quite the skeleton in its closet, a box of bones supinely displayed, carefully encased in wax, wrapped in burlap, and positioned on a board. "Somebody took great pains to take a very fragmentary skeleton and bring it here," said Monge, the curator who oversees the physical anthropology section of the museum in University City. "Therefore, it must be important. " There was no catalog card or identifying information. So the skeleton sat obscurely for years in a ground-floor storage room at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jon and Alexis Sherman are expecting their first baby, and after heavy rains earlier this year, they had to hurry to waterproof and finish their basement in advance of the little one's arrival. "We bought the house as our first home, and we didn't want to overstretch ourselves," said Jon Sherman, a filmmaker at two companies in Philadelphia - Video City, of which he is president, and Expo Films, which he co-founded. (Alexis Sherman is assistant director of human resources at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.)
REAL_ESTATE
June 15, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My son and daughter-in-law purchased a twin ranch home with a finished basement in the Northeast in September. The recent heavy rains invaded their home and caused a great deal of damage to the back wall in both the basement and the bedroom above. They called an adjuster, who cut out the damaged walls and removed carpet, and brought in fans and a dehumidifier. All materials were saved for the insurance company to see. The adjuster said he would file the insurance claim for them, and that potential causes of the water intrusion could be the bedroom window and the back patio, put in by a previous owner.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia men received long prison sentences Monday after they pleaded guilty to fatally shooting an 80-year-old man during a burglary at his Southwest Philadelphia home in which they stole a laptop. Common Pleas Court Judge Rose Marie DeFino-Nastasi sentenced Sean Johnson, 20, to 35 to 70 years in prison, and Aaron Pitts, 22, to 20 to 40 years. A jury was about to be chosen Monday for the two men's trial. Instead, the pair pleaded guilty to third-degree murder, burglary, robbery, and related offenses in the May 2012 slaying of Joseph Fleming, 80, of the 6600 block of Yocum Street.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: I came across your article about coating interior stone foundation walls, but my question concerns coating the exterior. My 1890s house has a fieldstone foundation with remnants of a white material clinging here and there. Would recoating it be a good thing aesthetically and perhaps keep some of the "critters" out? Answer: Having never seen your house, I wouldn't know whether coating the foundation would be aesthetically pleasing. I imagine whatever you use would need to be in keeping with the age and architecture of the house.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update: Authorities have arrested Michael Beer in connection with the pipe bombs. He is the son of the woman who reported finding the devices. Earlier Story NORTHEAST PHILA. Hours after the bomb squad left, neighbors lingered at Shisler and Benner Streets in Oxford Circle on Thursday, pointing at the caution tape still draped across the alley. Most had just returned home after police had ordered them out, a precaution after six pipe bombs were found in a house on the 6100 block of Shisler.
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA After 17 hours of tense negotiations periodically interrupted by gunfire, Philadelphia police coaxed a troubled Temple University student out of a rowhouse basement Monday morning, averting a threatened suicide. The 26-year-old student, whose name police have not released, was not injured in the standoff, which left two residential streets near campus on lockdown and many students trapped in their apartments on orders from SWAT officers. The student - who police said has a history of behavioral-health and substance-abuse issues - was taken to Temple University Hospital for a mental-health evaluation.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AN ALL-DAY standoff with an armed Temple University student began yesterday morning when police were called to a home near campus where a man had barricaded himself in the basement, fired shots and threatened to commit suicide. Negotiations continued late into the night. Gunshots were heard in the morning and a series of shots were heard in the late afternoon, Chief Inspector Joe Sullivan told the Daily News . Negotiators continued to communicate with the distraught man last night.
NEWS
August 20, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AN OLNEY WOMAN described by a neighbor as "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" has been charged with holding a woman with special needs captive in her basement. Police arrested Regina Bennett, 46, of Linton Street near 2nd, shortly after midnight Saturday following a verbal dispute with a neighbor. Authorities said that after taking Bennett into custody, neighbors informed them there was a small child living in the house, although police did not see signs of a child. Police said officers and a supervisor conducted a walk-through of the home and discovered a 36-year-old woman in the basement bound to a bed in "unsuitable conditions.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: My husband and I are selling our home, and the buyer is requesting the removal of the oil tank in our basement. We switched to gas a few years ago. Do you have any advice for how we should go about having the tank removed? The oil was siphoned out when we switched to gas, but I don't know if it is 100 percent clean and dry. In other words, I don't know if it would be a big mess if we call a scrap metal guy to come cut it up. Answer: The solution is much easier than if the tank were one of those buried in the yard, because all sorts of environmental regulations kick in, and for good reason, since having fuel oil leaking into the groundwater is very bad. In your case, you should contact the nearest company that deals in removing basement tanks.
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