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Basic Cable

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NEWS
April 17, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After several months of debate and haggling between commissioners and Suburban Cable, township cable subscribers will start paying less for basic cable next month. In a letter sent to about 3,800 Nether Providence customers this week, Suburban Cable's general manager, Joseph DiJulio, outlined the savings - 41 cents monthly - effective May 15. The bad news: All premium channels will cost $2 more per month. Debate over the rates began last year, when township commissioners discovered that the cable company was charging more than the recommended benchmarks set by the Federal Communications Commission.
NEWS
February 13, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township commissioners voted unanimously Thursday to order Suburban Cable to roll back its rate for basic cable service to the limit established by the Federal Communications Commission. The action came after several months of debate, which culminated with a visit from Joseph DiJulio, Suburban Cable's general manager, at a Feb. 2 caucus meeting. DiJulio maintained that the rate, while nearly $1 per customer higher than the FCC benchmark, was fair. The same rate is charged to all 44 of the municipalities the company serves in Delaware County.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1997 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some Philadelphia-area cable television operators are balking at the demand that they provide Comcast-Spectacor's new regional sports service as a basic channel to their subscribers. "Sports programming is of interest to a minority of our customers," said Michael J. Rider, business manager of Wade Cable in Philadelphia. "Since it's a very expensive service, we don't think it's fair that folks who don't care about sports will have to pay for that," he said. Harron Communications, which owns cable TV systems in Delaware and Chester Counties, said it would not offer Comcast SportsNet if it must run it as a basic channel and pass along "a sizable increase" in rates to its 42,000 subscribers.
NEWS
July 27, 1997 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prism is dead. So is SportsChannel Philadelphia. The premium cable-television channel and its basic cable counterpart will vanish in the fall. And the Phillies, Flyers and 76ers games they featured will start appearing in October on a new basic cable channel, Comcast SportsNet, which millions of cable subscribers across the region are going to end up paying for - whether they like sports or not. That is the outcome of a cable turf war that began 16 months ago, when cable giant Comcast Corp.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2009 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last vestiges of cable price controls are quickly being dismantled by Comcast Corp. and other cable companies, as well as the federal agency that regulates the industry. The town-by-town deregulation actions for the lowest level of cable service certainly will lead to price hikes for the people who can least afford them - lower-income families, according to a top consumer advocate. "The people who purchase basic cable are usually the people who can only afford the basic tier, and they cannot afford sharp price increases," Stefanie Brand, director of the New Jersey Division of Rate Counsel, said last week.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
About 23,000 Main Line subscribers of Harron Cable TV Co. will be given the option of paying $10.95 a month for an economy basic cable package or continuing with full basic cable for $19.95 a month, an increase from the current $17.95. The economy basic package, available March 6, includes a $50 conversion fee related to the cost of special installation equipment, according to Greg Raymond, regional manager for Harron. Harron customers include residents of Newtown, Malvern, Edgmont, Tredyffrin, Easttown and Willistown.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
Though the film opens today, "Tomorrow Never Dies," the latest James Bond movie, already has a date to air on CBS in 2000. The network has inked a deal to pay $20 million for exclusive rights to the Pierce Brosnan 007er. The CBS airing will follow a TV debut on the pay-cable channel Showtime. CBS's deal gives the network five runs of the movie over five years. The film's $20 million TV ticket tag is the latest in an ongoing escalation of prices for big-screenn movies.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Carol Stahl of Newtown Square may not know it, but she has something in common with the congressional General Accounting Office. Both have found that the cost of basic cable has soared since cable television was deregulated in 1984 and municipal regulation in most communities was eliminated. Stahl recently complained to the Newtown Township Board of Supervisors that her bill for basic cable had "skyrocketed" since 1986, rising from $9.95 to a rate of $19.95, which was scheduled to go into effect Friday.
SPORTS
September 29, 1996 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After months of unsuccessful negotiations to find a single cable television outlet for their home games, the Flyers announced yesterday that they would produce their own telecasts and distribute them to the area's cable operators. The Flyers have reached agreements with the three largest operators in the region - Comcast Cable, Lenfest Communications (Suburban Cable) and Garden State Cable. Negotiations continue with other cable operators. Comcast, Suburban and Garden State represent 1.5 million subscribers.
NEWS
August 24, 1993 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township could earn more than $1 million a year if a new cable TV company begins operations in the area. Township officials announced last night that they were negotiating with ITI Technical Services Inc., of Tierra Verde, Fla., to locate an office building in the township. The building would be part of ITI's plan to install a fiber optics cable network in the township and in eight neighboring Burlington County towns, mostly along the riverfront. Robert D. Evans, vice president of ITI, said the township would lease the cable system from the company and would receive the fees charged to subscribers.
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SPORTS
April 17, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The microscope you can buy with a billion-dollar budget must give a lot better view of things than basic cable. That's the only way to explain what 76ers managing owner Josh Harris witnessed over the course of the first 81 games this season. Before coach Brett Brown was forced to send one more talent-deprived lineup out on the Wells Fargo Center court for the final game of the season against the Miami Heat on Wednesday night, Harris sat down in front of a bank of microphones and a pool of reporters to give his state-of-the-team address.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
ISSUE | TONY AUTH Divisive caricatures At the risk of interrupting the recent hagiography of Tony Auth, I recall his consistently insulting and simplistic caricatures of people of faith and political conservatives ("A witness to Auth's genius," Sept. 21). While he was often insightful and his talent was undeniable, in my opinion he also contributed to our nation's culture of political invective and partisanship. |Andy Horvath, Towson, Md., andyh2247@yahoo.com ISSUE | COMCAST Basic cable offering UPDATE : Comcast reported on Wednesday that, as of July, PCN was moved into its basic cable tier.  What does it say about Comcast's claim to good public service that the only cable station carrying Monday's gubernatorial debate between Gov. Corbett and Tom Wolf was Comcast's channel 186 in its extra-cost service tier?
NEWS
May 23, 2014
CONSUMERS UNION hates Kabletown, thinks it's too big already and wants it to grow no more. Nonprofit Consumers Union says it works to make for a "fair, just and safe marketplace for all consumers. " Kabletown is what Comcast was called on Tina Fey's brilliant "30 Rock," the title being shorthand for the headquarters of NBC Universal, which Comcast bought from GE. Yes, Philadelphia's Comcast. Wednesday morning, when Comcast held its annual shareholders meeting at the Kimmel Center, Consumers Union and other big-is-bad groups planned to crash it to protest Comcast's proposal to swallow Time Warner.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Philip and Elizabeth have an arranged marriage. The matchmaker was a colonel in the KGB. For 16 years, they've been living as husband and wife, prototypical suburban parents (in other words, child chauffeurs) in Falls Church, Va. But they're also on call as highly trained covert operatives for the Soviet Union. That's the premise of The Americans , a bold and exciting new series on FX (Wednesdays, 10 p.m.). Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys star as the couple leading a double life.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Heavy flows the nog. While conventional TV goes into hibernation every December, an ever-expanding catalogue of holiday-themed movies and specials fills the void. Two channels in particular - Hallmark and ABC Family - always seem to stockpile enough new made-for-TV movies to light up primetime through the entire yuletide season. It's like having a pair of Advent calendars to open every night. Even Lifetime gets into the act in December, with a stocking full of original movies like Finding Mrs. Claus and The Real St. Nick . (Of course, as soon as the holiday is over, Lifetime reverts to its trademark programming: TV movies about women who are either victims or perpetrators of incredibly heinous crimes.)
BUSINESS
October 17, 2012
IN THE REGION National Penn to move headquarters National Penn Bancshares Inc. will move its headquarters and 275 managers and staff to Allentown from its longtime home in Boyertown, Berks County. National Penn will also open a new back office on Broadcasting Road in Reading to employ 125, while an additional 150 workers will stay in Boyertown. The bank holding company, with 120 branches, picked Allentown for its headquarters because it is now second-largest bank in the Lehigh Valley, said Scott V. Fainor, its chief executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Ellen Gray and Daily News Staff Writer
AMC's "Mad Men" and FX's "American Horror Story" tied Thursday for the most Emmy nominations, with 17 apiece. But the two basic cable shows won't be facing each other in the competition for outstanding drama. Because while you might have thought both were regular series, the FX show, taking advantage, perhaps, of its anthology format, is competing in the movies and miniseries category, up against HBO's "Game Change," the History Channel's "Hatfields & McCoys," HBO's "Hemingway & Gellhorn," BBC America's "Luther" and PBS' "Masterpiece" presentation "Sherlock: A Scandal in Belgravia.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2012 | David Hiltbrand
Were I still a gambling man, there are several wagers I would be eager to make after this strange week of television. To wit:   The cruelest thing I saw was on the debut of the CBS summer docu-series Dogs in the City. It was nothing that the show's star, canine behavior-modifier Justin Silver, did. He was really cool, like a GQ Cesar Millan, taxiing around Manhattan to conduct interventions on a number of crazy pooches and the far crazier humans on the other end of their leashes.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
It's a long and twisty trail that leads from Alexander the Great to Larry the Cable Guy, but the History Channel would gladly travel it again. The cable outlet launched on New Year's Day in 1995 with lofty aspirations befitting its name. It offered a library of documentaries about everything from the Precambrian Era to the Crusades to the Korean War. Ladies and gentlemen, we have discovered the cure for insomnia. The subject matter was too dry for TV's heightened narrative style.
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