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Bath Salts

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NEWS
March 26, 2011 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A Northeast Pennsylvania couple almost slash their 5-year-old daughter with knives as they attack "voices in the walls. " A man caught burglarizing an upstate house tells police he was "chased by electricity. " And two men die of exposure in Allegheny National Forest. Those episodes - all in the last two weeks - are being attributed by authorities to a new and potentially lethal designer drug known as "bath salts. " And it's legal. Use of the powerful party drug, first popularized in European clubs, has swept across the nation, alarming police, physicians, and parents and galvanizing legislators in Pennsylvania and other states to take action.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Delaware Gov. Jack Markell is preparing to sign a law that would outlaw designer drugs often referred to as bath salts. Markell is scheduled to sign the bill Wednesday afternoon in Dover. The bill was quickly approved this month by state lawmakers, who worked to enact a permanent ban on the drugs before a temporary ban imposed by state officials last year under an emergency rule expired. Authorities say chemicals used to make bath salts can produce effects similar to those of cocaine, LSD and methamphetamine, and can lead to dangerous, violent and suicidal behavior.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Michael Hinkelman and Daily News Staff Writer
This story has been updated. A naked man shot and killed by Miami police on Saturday when he reportedly refused to stop eating the face of another man wearing only a shirt may have been high on bath salts. Police have theorized that the "cannibal man," Rudy Eugene, may have been hallucinating as a result of a drug-induced mania, according to reports. Eugene may have suffered from an overdose of bath salts, which some have described as the "new LSD" and are pushed as having properties similar to cocaine and methamphetamine on users, reports said.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
POTTSVILLE, Pa. - An emergency injunction against the sale of the synthetic drug known as bath salts has been issued in a fifth Pennsylvania county. Schuylkill County Court Judge Jacqueline Russell issued the injunction Wednesday banning four stores from selling the chemicals. The drugs can cause extreme paranoia and hallucinations. They can be purchased for as little as $10 at some gas stations and smoke shops as well as online. Injunctions have also been issued in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Centre, and Columbia Counties.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Bath salts" selling more frequently across the country are not the ones Grandma sprinkled in her warm bath. They are designer drugs that New Jersey officials outlawed Thursday as they detailed recent stories of users who had extreme, violent reactions. "Shady retailers are playing a deadly game, selling highly dangerous drugs with fake labels like 'bath salts' or 'plant food' to evade the law," New Jersey Attorney General Paula Dow said as she announced raids of businesses storing the drugs.
NEWS
March 10, 2011
SCRANTON - Police have charged a Scranton man with breaking into a monastery residence hall and attacking a priest with a knife early Ash Wednesday. Scranton police say Ryan Foley, 25, attacked the priest at St. Ann's Basilica while under the influence of bath salts, legal chemicals not approved for human consumption. The Rev. Francis Landry told police he was asleep when he woke up to a man standing in his room who attacked him before fleeing. Foley was captured a short time later inside the building.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
The drugs known as "bath salts" will soon be banned in Pennsylvania. Gov. Corbett signed a bill Thursday making it illegal to sell or possess them and other so-called designer drugs such as synthetic marijuana. Bath salts have grown in popularity across Pennsylvania in the last six months, selling for as little as $10 in some convenience stores and on the Internet. State authorities have linked use of the drug to an increasing number of violent - even fatal - behaviors. Twenty states, including New Jersey, have made the sale of bath salts illegal, but there is no federal prohibition.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
HARRISBURG - The state House of Representatives voted unanimously Monday to ban the synthetically produced drugs known as bath salts. The House bill also would add the salvia divinorum plant, the chemicals salvinorin A and divinorin A, synthetic marijuana, and synthetic cocaine or heroin to the list of Schedule I controlled substances. The House amended the bill to prohibit all chemical substances analogous to bath salts. The bill now goes to the Senate. Drugs packaged as bath salts or incense sell for as little as $10 and can cause extreme paranoia and hallucinations.
NEWS
March 12, 2011 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The active ingredients in a class of designer drugs known as "bath salts" would be made illegal if a bill supported by Sen. Bob Casey is passed into law. When ingested by snorting or smoking, MDPV (methylenedioxypyrovalerone) and mephedrone are said to have effects similar to those of methamphetamine and attention deficit disorder drugs. The powders are commonly sold in small packets in smoke shops and convenience stores and over the Internet. Brand names include Ivory Wave, Tranquility, and Wave, Casey (D., Pa.)
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NEWS
December 31, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
UNTIL YESTERDAY, Angel Suarez was known around the race track as the horse-whispering whiz kid. Just 21, the quiet jockey based at Parx Racing won so many races - and millions of dollars - two years ago that he drew national notice as one of the sport's top apprentices. That he'd come late to racing made his success even more astounding. "He had no racing background," his former agent, Donna Servis, told the Daily Racing Form in 2013. "He woke up one day, told his mom he wanted to be a jockey, and she said, 'What?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Dan Gross
PHILLY HIP-HOP HEROES The Roots will perform their own set and also back Naughty By Nature at the annual Roots Picnic, June 1 at Festival Pier. Last year's event was two days long, but this year's is one day solidly packed with an eclectic lineup. Artists include Gary Clark Jr. , Grimes , Macklemore & Ryan Lewis , Solange (aka Beyonce 's sister and star of "Bring it On: All or Nothing") How to Dress Well, the Gaslamp Killer and more. This is the sixth annual Roots Picnic and marks one of the "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon " band's few local shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2013 | By Dan Gross
PHILLY HIP-HOP HEROES The Roots will perform their own set and also back Naughty By Nature at the annual Roots Picnic, June 1 at Festival Pier at Penn's Landing. Last year's event was two days long, but this year's is one day solidly packed with an eclectic lineup. Artists include Gary Clark Jr. , Grimes , Macklemore & Ryan Lewis , Solange (a/k/a Beyonce 's sister and star of "Bring it On: All or Nothing"), How to Dress Well, the Gaslamp Killer and more. The sixth-annual Roots Picnic marks one of the few local shows for the "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon " house band.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Authorities arrested 15 people Thursday and seized hundreds of illegal synthetic drugs with names like "Scooby Snax" and "Eight Baalz" in one of the first major raids of an alleged distribution ring since Pennsylvania banned the substances a year ago. The arrests followed a yearlong investigation into J&L Wholesale Distributors of Allentown and its owner, Kenneth Grossman, 52. Prosecutors alleged the company supplied the illegal products and...
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Statistics tracked by the New Jersey Attorney General's Office suggest that use of the designer drugs known as bath salts and synthetic marijuana has significantly declined since the state recently banned them. Reports of bath salts to New Jersey's poison hotline have declined by 66 percent and synthetic marijuana by 33 percent, according to the Attorney General's Office. Exposure to bath salts was first reported to the state's poison control center in January 2011, with incidents increasing through the following April, when the state cracked down on the drug.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Statistics tracked by the New Jersey Attorney General's Office suggest that use of the designer drugs known as bath salts and synthetic marijuana has significantly declined since the state recently banned them. Reports of bath salts to New Jersey's poison hotline have declined by 66 percent and synthetic marijuana by 33 percent, according to the Attorney General's Office. Exposure to bath salts was first reported to the state's poison control center in January 2011, with incidents increasing through the following April, when the state cracked down on the drug.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Authorities arrested 15 people Thursday and seized hundreds of illegal synthetic drugs with names like "Scooby Snax" and "Eight Baalz" in one of the first major raids of an alleged distribution ring since Pennsylvania banned the substances a year ago. The arrests followed a yearlong investigation into J&L Wholesale Distributors of Allentown and its owner, Kenneth Grossman, 52. Prosecutors alleged the company supplied the illegal products and...
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | Bill Bender
Narcotics agents and Pennsylvania State Troopers are cracking down on businesses that deal synthetic drugs as part of a statewide roundup of "bath salts" and other substances that were outlawed last year, Attorney General Linda Kelly announced Thursday. "These man-made chemicals have triggered a wave of bizarre and violent reactions, medical emergencies and deaths across the country since they began appearing on the street in 2009," Kelly said. "Despite innocent sounding names like ‘Bliss' or ‘Vanilla Sky,' these drugs can combine the worst qualities of traditional street drugs like LSD, cocaine or methamphetamine.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Jason Nark, Daily News Staff Writer
There are a thousand ways to blow your money in Atlantic City. There's the obvious way, of course, and few gamblers stay in the black for life.   There are lobster dinners, too, tacky T-shirts, large bronze statues of Neptune, roller coasters, beach bars and boxing matches, and at least one Boardwalk store I saw that could supply a gang of pot, uh, I mean tobacco-smoking ninjas with a cache of plastic pellet guns, throwing knives and...
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