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NEWS
August 20, 1987 | By SCOTT FLANDER, Daily News Staff Writer
Atlantic City's beaches were closed to bathers this morning after the city Health Department found high levels of bacteria in the water. Swimmers were ordered out of the water about 11 a.m. on instructions from the Health Department, Capt. Rod Aluise of the Atlantic City Beach Patrol said. The city's beaches will remain closed at least through today, although some could be reopened tomorrow, according to City Administrator Carl Briscoe. Water samples taken Monday revealed unsafe levels of fecal coliform bacteria, city officials said.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
Ocean City reopened beaches from Stenton Place to Delancey Place this morning to bathers when test results taken after a sewer leak proved negative. Officials had restricted bathing at those beaches starting Sunday night when a grease clog caused a nearby sewer to overflow. Officials were concerned the water possibly entered the storm drain system. They alerted the Cape May County Health Department, which was called to test the water as a precaution. Officials closed about 1,300 foot stretch of water to bathing and swimming until the tests were complete.
NEWS
July 2, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're slimy, gelatinous sea creatures about the size of a dime, and they're washing up on Ocean City beaches. The clear, blob-like salps appear every few years, usually driven in by winds and ocean currents, state officials said. They don't sting or harm bathers. They're just annoying, especially when encountered in clusters. Salps "pop up when the conditions are right, then they're gone a short time later," said Larry Ragonese, a spokesman for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
July 5, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1920s, in Atlantic City, there were no segregated beaches in the resort town, and black residents rented bathing suits from bathhouses and waved from Miss America Parade floats like any other bathing beauties. But by 1928, influential hotel owners were pressured by wealthy white guests who did not want to "bathe side by side with colored bathers," to quote a letter on Hotel Strand letterhead, a copy of which is in the new blockbuster exhibit "Jet Black, Brown and Tan on the Beach," at the city's Arts Garage at 2200 Fairmount Ave., across from Angelo's.
NEWS
July 24, 2002 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The guy in the kayak was the first to cry shark. "He came in screaming, 'Big - shark - in - water,' " J.J. Walsh, a Longport lifeguard at the 30th Street beach, said yesterday. "He came in, yelled, and kept on going. " That was Sunday, when Longport and Margate beach patrols yanked bathers out of the water temporarily while lifeguards in boats went to investigate. On Friday, bathers in Atlantic City were restricted to ankle-deep wading after a similar sighting in the warm (mid-70s)
NEWS
October 13, 1993 | Daily News wire services
RIO DE JANEIRO YOUTHS TERRORIZE BEACH LOVERS Bathers and tourists fled in panic on Rio's most famous beaches as gangs of youths fought running battles and police fired shots to disperse them yesterday, Brazilian television reported. Eight people were injured and 20 arrested in what O Globo network called a "climate of war," on Rio's beaches. Many of those arrested were caught trying to steal bathers' possessions. The network showed bathers and tourists fleeing into the water as the youths fought for four hours at spots popular with foreign visitors - the Copacabana, Ipanema and Arpoador beaches.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - In 114 years, no one has drowned on their watch. But once the 154 members of the Ocean City Beach Patrol are off duty - especially when the weather is tropical, the water is unseasonably warm, and sunset is still hours away - bathers put their lives in danger. Elsewhere on the Jersey Shore, five fatalities related to rip currents have been reported in recent weeks, according to authorities. In most cases, the deaths happened where guards had packed up for the day. Anticipating the crush of bathers that comes during the high season, the Ocean City patrol has expanded its presence on three downtown beaches.
NEWS
May 29, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - Like an army vigilant in a singular mission, a uniformed patrol took to the beach for the 100th time Saturday, the unofficial start of the 2011 summer season. Despite the active surf - among the most roiling at the Jersey Shore, as the Atlantic Ocean meets the Delaware Bay at the state's southern tip - the Cape May Beach Patrol can celebrate its centennial by reveling in a remarkable record: No one has drowned on its watch. "That record has to do with training, with a certain understanding of what the conditions are here, and with procedures and traditions that have been passed down through the years," Beach Patrol Capt.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Art Museum at Princeton University is blessed in having on long-term loan a major collection of 19th- and 20th-century art assembled by the late Henry Pearlman, a New York businessman who died in 1974. The Pearlman collection has long been distinguished by a large bloc of more than 30 works by Cezanne - oils, watercolors, drawings and prints. The six oils normally are on view at Princeton, but the works on paper, being far more delicate, usually are in storage. Since the watercolors aren't brought out very often, the current exhibition at the museum represents a rare opportunity to see all the Pearlman Cezannes together.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 5, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1920s, in Atlantic City, there were no segregated beaches in the resort town, and black residents rented bathing suits from bathhouses and waved from Miss America Parade floats like any other bathing beauties. But by 1928, influential hotel owners were pressured by wealthy white guests who did not want to "bathe side by side with colored bathers," to quote a letter on Hotel Strand letterhead, a copy of which is in the new blockbuster exhibit "Jet Black, Brown and Tan on the Beach," at the city's Arts Garage at 2200 Fairmount Ave., across from Angelo's.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2013 | By Bob Ecker, For The Inquirer
QUEBEC - The happy group of 15 came pouring around the bend; men and women, some young, some older, dressed in boots, hats, gloves - and bathing suits. Walking single file through the snow, they approached a small mound and were greeted by the famous master of ceremonies, Bonhomme, as Quebec City's annual Winter Carnival's Snow Bath officially opened. The huge audience, suitably dressed for the minus-4-degree C weather, began taunting and laughing at the would-be "snow bathers. " Playful snowballs immediately began to fly between the audience, participants, and even Bonhomme.
NEWS
September 8, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
  ATLANTIC CITY - Two women and a teenage boy ignored the stern whistle warnings of lifeguards to stay close to shore, to venture only waist-deep into the surf off North Carolina Avenue. Rip currents - which can move as fast as eight feet per second, faster than an Olympic swimmer can sprint - pulled the three farther and farther from shore, into deeper water, where relentless monster waves nearly drowned them. By the time four lifeguards were able to pull them to safety, the swimmers were battered and exhausted, said Beach Patrol Chief Rod Aluise.
NEWS
August 15, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
Ocean City reopened beaches from Stenton Place to Delancey Place this morning to bathers when test results taken after a sewer leak proved negative. Officials had restricted bathing at those beaches starting Sunday night when a grease clog caused a nearby sewer to overflow. Officials were concerned the water possibly entered the storm drain system. They alerted the Cape May County Health Department, which was called to test the water as a precaution. Officials closed about 1,300 foot stretch of water to bathing and swimming until the tests were complete.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - In 114 years, no one has drowned on their watch. But once the 154 members of the Ocean City Beach Patrol are off duty - especially when the weather is tropical, the water is unseasonably warm, and sunset is still hours away - bathers put their lives in danger. Elsewhere on the Jersey Shore, five fatalities related to rip currents have been reported in recent weeks, according to authorities. In most cases, the deaths happened where guards had packed up for the day. Anticipating the crush of bathers that comes during the high season, the Ocean City patrol has expanded its presence on three downtown beaches.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
HERE'S the image from Sept. 11, 2001, that sticks in my mind: An old man walks towards me on an inlet beach at the Jersey Shore, a small dot at first, growing larger as he nears the point, pausing once or twice to sneak a cigarette. The old man is my dad, and he's trying to make out like he's not smoking, pretending to enjoy the view, to watch a passing boat, and who knows why he pretended. We all knew what he was doing. And looking back, I'm glad for every stolen puff.
NEWS
July 2, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're slimy, gelatinous sea creatures about the size of a dime, and they're washing up on Ocean City beaches. The clear, blob-like salps appear every few years, usually driven in by winds and ocean currents, state officials said. They don't sting or harm bathers. They're just annoying, especially when encountered in clusters. Salps "pop up when the conditions are right, then they're gone a short time later," said Larry Ragonese, a spokesman for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
NEWS
May 29, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - Like an army vigilant in a singular mission, a uniformed patrol took to the beach for the 100th time Saturday, the unofficial start of the 2011 summer season. Despite the active surf - among the most roiling at the Jersey Shore, as the Atlantic Ocean meets the Delaware Bay at the state's southern tip - the Cape May Beach Patrol can celebrate its centennial by reveling in a remarkable record: No one has drowned on its watch. "That record has to do with training, with a certain understanding of what the conditions are here, and with procedures and traditions that have been passed down through the years," Beach Patrol Capt.
NEWS
May 28, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
CAPE MAY - Like an army vigilant in a singular mission, a uniformed patrol took to the beach for the 100th time Saturday, the unofficial start of the 2011 summer season. Despite the active surf - one of the most roiling at the New Jersey Shore as the Atlantic Ocean meets the Delaware Bay at the state's southernmost tip - the Cape May Beach Patrol can celebrate its centennial by reveling in a remarkable record: Not a single person has drowned on a beach it was protecting. "That record has to do with training, with a certain understanding of what the conditions are here and with procedures and traditions that have been passed down through the years," said Beach Patrol Capt.
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