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Batman

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NEWS
August 6, 1989 | Inquirer photographs by Vicki Valerio
The Caped Crusader is a hit in the movie theaters - and on the streets of the city. All around town, people are spreading their wings and showing the spirit in clothing and accessories.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1989 | Daily News Wire Servics
CBS Television has paid upward of $20 million for the television broadcast rights to Warner Bros.' megahit "Batman," sources said yesterday. Insiders said the blockbuster film could begin the first of several televised showings as early as May 1991. One source said the $20 million price tag comes with an escalator clause which could hike the price to about $30 million. CBS was not immediately avaiable for comment. To date, "Batman" has grossed $251 million in theatrical revenues and is the fastest selling videocassette in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Batman Begins, it looks as if the future of the Caped Crusader is in good hands. Director Christopher Nolan's first foray into the legend of the Dark Knight lends some grit to the franchise, which had become an over-the-top and downright cartoony take on Bob Kane's character. This turning point in Batman's theatrical portfolio (a sequel is planned for 2008) is only one of the many reasons to grab the DVD, which is full of great extras. "You couldn't pull it off properly unless you become a beast when you were inside of that suit," Christian Bale says in the special features.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2008 | By DAVID TISCHMAN For the Daily News
Criminals are a "superstitious, cowardly lot," according to millionaire Bruce Wayne in Detective Comics #27, published in 1939. That's why he chose the bat as his costumed symbol. But in "The Dark Knight," things are more complicated in 21st century Gotham City, and director Christopher Nolan fine-tunes the character he created in 2005's "Batman Begins. " Gone is the childhood trauma of seeing his parents Thomas and Martha Wayne gunned down in cold blood. "The origin story is a very heavy story, but it very much binds you to the past," Nolan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
That Batman is incredible. In two-plus hours of lavish Hollywood fantasy, the Caped Crusader takes care of what ails Gotham City, blurs the distinction between good and evil, and gets the girl besides. Now Batman - or, more accurately, Batman, the film that has grossed more than $200 million - is credited for reviving Prince's career as well. Faster than you can say "comeback," Prince, the funk visionary whose popularity had waned in recent years - has been vindicated by the marketplace, his status as pop idol restored.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributos to this report include Reuters, the Associated Press and USA Today
Just as Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom prompted Hollywood to come up with a new rating (PG-13) aimed at discouraging young patrons, Batman has sparked a change in the rating system in the land where it was made. British censors announced yesterday that the Board of Film Classification had employed a new rating category to inform parents that Batman was unsuitable for children under 12. Film board director James Ferman, who screened the film, said, "Some of it was very dark, unlike the television series or the comics I read as a boy. Jack Nicholson as the Joker is increasingly sadistic, and at one point he scars Jerry Hall's face with acid, which he thinks is a joke.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Batman, a superhero created by Bob Kane in 1939 and spoofed as the Caped Crusader in the 1964-66 television show, is about to become a 1989 movie star with the scheduled release of a new Batman movie on June 23. Although the movie was shot in London and the story is set in fictional Gotham City, area comic-book store owner Frank Link said Delaware County comic fans have been caught up in Batman fever for months. In fact, he said, comics featuring Batman have been selling at his three stores at more than 1,000 a month.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the last week he has been analyzed by prominent psychiatrists, declared liable for the most pervasive syndrome since post-traumatic stress was found in returning Vietnam vets and has surprised a nation by earning $42 million in less than 72 hours. The diagnosis of Harvey Greenberg, professor of psychiatry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, is that "it's reasonably clear that this poor bugger is reliving the catastrophic death of his parents. " That "poor bugger," for those two or three of you who have failed to guess the identity of our mystery guest, is Batman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1989 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Word has it that Warner Home Video has a "making of the movie" video waiting in the wings for the day Batman (coming to cassette on Wednesday) needs another marketing push, in much the same way that the Star Wars and Indiana Jones movies got extra mileage with their behind-the-scenes specials. Meanwhile, Bat-fans with a thirst for more about their favorite hero have someplace else to turn. Burbank Video, a marketing label for Viking Entertainment (818-843-2105), recently has released a compilation cassette called Batmania: From Comics to Screen (45 minutes, $19.95)
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
During a recent visit to Philadelphia, Umberto Eco sat in the lobby of the Four Seasons Hotel discussing modern literature, Batman, opera, American detective novels, political correctness, growing up in Mussolini's Italy, 17th-century philosophy and Mickey Mouse. That is an extraordinary range of topics for an hour's conversation, but Eco is no ordinary man. The energetic 64-year-old author teaches semiotics, the study of symbols, at the University of Bologna in northern Italy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
During his prolific career, writer Chuck Dixon-best-known for his comic book work, wrote about tough heroes like the Batman and the Punisher. Along the way, he created villains like King Snake and, most famously, Bane. Now, he's gone from a fictional character who broke Batman's back to real-life characters who broke the bank. "Clinton Cash: A Graphic Novel," adapted by Dixon and artist Brett R. Smith from the book by Peter Schweizer, follows the allegedly shady connections between Clinton Foundation donors, paid speeches given by Bill Clinton and actions approved by the U.S. State Department while Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, FOR PHILLY.COM/GEEK
During a seminal run in the 1990s, Dan Jurgens wrote some of the best-selling Superman stories of the past 25 years. He killed and resurrected the hero and added now-classic and formidable villains to his rogue's gallery, like Doomsday and Cyborg Superman. Given all that, returning to the character as part of DC's line-wide relaunch "Rebirth," may strike some as a no-win scenario. Jurgens doesn't think so. "I think that, this time in knowing what this character is and knowing what 'Rebirth' was designed to do, that there was a natural fit there," he told Comics Guy Jerome Maida.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
The weekend box office for Batman v Superman decreased faster than a speeding bullet. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice fell a steep 68 percent in its second weekend in theaters, according to comScore estimates Sunday. The superhero pic earned an estimated $52.4 million over the weekend, easily besting the modest new openers like God's Not Dead 2 and Meet the Blacks . The Zack Snyder -directed movie cost a reported $250 million to produce and around $150 million to market, and has earned an estimated $261.5 million to date.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
SUPERMAN. Batman. Wonder Woman. Critics. Who wins? Duh. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice rebounded from a bat cave full of bad reviews to debut with a massive $170.1 million in North America, the sixth best opening of all-time. The stakes were high for the Warner Bros. release, which cost $250 million to make and about $150 million to market. But the studio's bid to launch a DC Comics universe to rival Marvel's empire was met with persistent PR pains and numerous changes in the release date.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Jerome Maida, For the Daily News
Although Batman and Superman will appear and fight on the big screen for the first time in a film hitting screens this weekend, the seemingly odd matchup has happened several times in the comics. Why are Superman and Batman presented at cross purposes so often - and why do fans enjoy that conflict? "People find the conflict between Superman and Batman compelling because the disparity in power levels of the two characters means that Batman will always have to come up with some incredibly clever strategy to survive and even triumph," said comics writer and historian Danny Fingeroth, author of Superman on the Couch: What Superheroes Really Tell Us About Ourselves and Our Society . "On the other hand, Superman's character will be tested as he has to battle an adversary who is so much less powerful, without killing him or looking like a bully.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
"Fearing the actions of a godlike Super Hero left unchecked, Gotham City's own formidable, forceful vigilante takes on Metropolis' most revered, modern-day savior, while the world wrestles with what sort of hero it really needs. And with Batman and Superman at war with each other, a new threat quickly arises, putting mankind in greater danger than it has ever known before. " - Warner Bros. synopsis for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice . Box office prognosticators are predicting big things for Friday's epic face-off, with two of the most iconic comic book characters-turned-film-franchises of all time sharing the screen and trying to take each other down, never mind the caped Kryptonian's obviously more-daunting skill set. Ben Affleck is the grouchy Gotham City crime fighter with the nocturnal flying-mammal fetish.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2016 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With his slick, black hair, lean silhouette, and chiseled features, Gerald "G-Eazy" Gillum could be a '40s gangster movie idol. Or a member of Roxy Music. Or a model of leather haute couture tuxedos. "That's me, man," G-Eazy, 26, says with a snicker. "I always dressed and had my hair like this, even if I'm not on stage. That's just me. " G-Eazy is a white rapper of coolly discordant, ominously symphonic, yet wildly commercial, slow electronic hip-hop that fills albums such as the new When It's Dark Out and packs rooms like the Fillmore Philadelphia, where he'll do two sold-out shows Tuesday and Wednesday.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some fathers bond with their sons over a baseball game, a museum visit, a day at the zoo. Others wake up at 4 in the morning, drive from Virginia to Philadelphia, dress up in Batman, Robin, and Nightwing costumes, and become celebrities at the Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con. "It's something we do together," said Dave Huffman, 47, outfitted in full Batman costume. "We've met a lot of fun people. " Huffman drove up from Chesapeake, Va., to spend the day with his sons at the Convention Center, where 25,000 visitors were expected over four days.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
THE TERM "living legend" is thrown around pretty loosely these days. However, when it comes to Neal Adams, the description is more than apt - and richly deserved. It was Adams who defined the look of iconic characters like Batman, Superman and Green Arrow for the modern age. In other words, it was Adams who gave them the look that we associate with them today. "All I really did was bring Batman back to what he was supposed to be," Adams said with typical modesty. "I didn't really change him. " Nevertheless, it is Adams' look for Batman and the others that almost every artist who has drawn the characters since aspires to. That's pretty impressive, but it pales in comparison to Adams' advocacy for creator rights, which was seared into him when he saw scores of artists lose their jobs because of a congressional crackdown on comics in the 1950s that made horror and crime comics disappear and prompted a Comics Code Authority to establish guidelines on appropriate content.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
HIS LIVING ROOM was a bit disheveled, the victim of last-minute haste. An enormous stack of silver and red sat in the corner. At the top was the square, metallic-blue helmet of Optimus Prime, overlooking the house with its antennae-like ears pointed upward. It was just four days until Wizard World Philadelphia and Eric "The Smoke" Moran was making the final alterations to his new lineup of costumes with the same fervor and excitement of a believer on Christmas Eve. In the basement of his Chestnut Hill townhouse, all four walls are covered with film posters, drawings and action figures - most still in their original packing.
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