CollectionsBatman
IN THE NEWS

Batman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | Inquirer photographs by Vicki Valerio
The Caped Crusader is a hit in the movie theaters - and on the streets of the city. All around town, people are spreading their wings and showing the spirit in clothing and accessories.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1989 | Daily News Wire Servics
CBS Television has paid upward of $20 million for the television broadcast rights to Warner Bros.' megahit "Batman," sources said yesterday. Insiders said the blockbuster film could begin the first of several televised showings as early as May 1991. One source said the $20 million price tag comes with an escalator clause which could hike the price to about $30 million. CBS was not immediately avaiable for comment. To date, "Batman" has grossed $251 million in theatrical revenues and is the fastest selling videocassette in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Batman Begins, it looks as if the future of the Caped Crusader is in good hands. Director Christopher Nolan's first foray into the legend of the Dark Knight lends some grit to the franchise, which had become an over-the-top and downright cartoony take on Bob Kane's character. This turning point in Batman's theatrical portfolio (a sequel is planned for 2008) is only one of the many reasons to grab the DVD, which is full of great extras. "You couldn't pull it off properly unless you become a beast when you were inside of that suit," Christian Bale says in the special features.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2008 | By DAVID TISCHMAN For the Daily News
Criminals are a "superstitious, cowardly lot," according to millionaire Bruce Wayne in Detective Comics #27, published in 1939. That's why he chose the bat as his costumed symbol. But in "The Dark Knight," things are more complicated in 21st century Gotham City, and director Christopher Nolan fine-tunes the character he created in 2005's "Batman Begins. " Gone is the childhood trauma of seeing his parents Thomas and Martha Wayne gunned down in cold blood. "The origin story is a very heavy story, but it very much binds you to the past," Nolan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
That Batman is incredible. In two-plus hours of lavish Hollywood fantasy, the Caped Crusader takes care of what ails Gotham City, blurs the distinction between good and evil, and gets the girl besides. Now Batman - or, more accurately, Batman, the film that has grossed more than $200 million - is credited for reviving Prince's career as well. Faster than you can say "comeback," Prince, the funk visionary whose popularity had waned in recent years - has been vindicated by the marketplace, his status as pop idol restored.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributos to this report include Reuters, the Associated Press and USA Today
Just as Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom prompted Hollywood to come up with a new rating (PG-13) aimed at discouraging young patrons, Batman has sparked a change in the rating system in the land where it was made. British censors announced yesterday that the Board of Film Classification had employed a new rating category to inform parents that Batman was unsuitable for children under 12. Film board director James Ferman, who screened the film, said, "Some of it was very dark, unlike the television series or the comics I read as a boy. Jack Nicholson as the Joker is increasingly sadistic, and at one point he scars Jerry Hall's face with acid, which he thinks is a joke.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Batman, a superhero created by Bob Kane in 1939 and spoofed as the Caped Crusader in the 1964-66 television show, is about to become a 1989 movie star with the scheduled release of a new Batman movie on June 23. Although the movie was shot in London and the story is set in fictional Gotham City, area comic-book store owner Frank Link said Delaware County comic fans have been caught up in Batman fever for months. In fact, he said, comics featuring Batman have been selling at his three stores at more than 1,000 a month.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
In the last week he has been analyzed by prominent psychiatrists, declared liable for the most pervasive syndrome since post-traumatic stress was found in returning Vietnam vets and has surprised a nation by earning $42 million in less than 72 hours. The diagnosis of Harvey Greenberg, professor of psychiatry at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, is that "it's reasonably clear that this poor bugger is reliving the catastrophic death of his parents. " That "poor bugger," for those two or three of you who have failed to guess the identity of our mystery guest, is Batman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1989 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Word has it that Warner Home Video has a "making of the movie" video waiting in the wings for the day Batman (coming to cassette on Wednesday) needs another marketing push, in much the same way that the Star Wars and Indiana Jones movies got extra mileage with their behind-the-scenes specials. Meanwhile, Bat-fans with a thirst for more about their favorite hero have someplace else to turn. Burbank Video, a marketing label for Viking Entertainment (818-843-2105), recently has released a compilation cassette called Batmania: From Comics to Screen (45 minutes, $19.95)
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
During a recent visit to Philadelphia, Umberto Eco sat in the lobby of the Four Seasons Hotel discussing modern literature, Batman, opera, American detective novels, political correctness, growing up in Mussolini's Italy, 17th-century philosophy and Mickey Mouse. That is an extraordinary range of topics for an hour's conversation, but Eco is no ordinary man. The energetic 64-year-old author teaches semiotics, the study of symbols, at the University of Bologna in northern Italy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some fathers bond with their sons over a baseball game, a museum visit, a day at the zoo. Others wake up at 4 in the morning, drive from Virginia to Philadelphia, dress up in Batman, Robin, and Nightwing costumes, and become celebrities at the Wizard World Philadelphia Comic Con. "It's something we do together," said Dave Huffman, 47, outfitted in full Batman costume. "We've met a lot of fun people. " Huffman drove up from Chesapeake, Va., to spend the day with his sons at the Convention Center, where 25,000 visitors were expected over four days.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
THE TERM "living legend" is thrown around pretty loosely these days. However, when it comes to Neal Adams, the description is more than apt - and richly deserved. It was Adams who defined the look of iconic characters like Batman, Superman and Green Arrow for the modern age. In other words, it was Adams who gave them the look that we associate with them today. "All I really did was bring Batman back to what he was supposed to be," Adams said with typical modesty. "I didn't really change him. " Nevertheless, it is Adams' look for Batman and the others that almost every artist who has drawn the characters since aspires to. That's pretty impressive, but it pales in comparison to Adams' advocacy for creator rights, which was seared into him when he saw scores of artists lose their jobs because of a congressional crackdown on comics in the 1950s that made horror and crime comics disappear and prompted a Comics Code Authority to establish guidelines on appropriate content.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
HIS LIVING ROOM was a bit disheveled, the victim of last-minute haste. An enormous stack of silver and red sat in the corner. At the top was the square, metallic-blue helmet of Optimus Prime, overlooking the house with its antennae-like ears pointed upward. It was just four days until Wizard World Philadelphia and Eric "The Smoke" Moran was making the final alterations to his new lineup of costumes with the same fervor and excitement of a believer on Christmas Eve. In the basement of his Chestnut Hill townhouse, all four walls are covered with film posters, drawings and action figures - most still in their original packing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
  STILL CRAZY after all these years . . .   Paul Simon and his wife, Edie Brickell , were arrested on disorderly conduct charges Saturday by officers investigating a family dispute, but the couple held hands in a Connecticut court yesterday and said they did not feel threatened by the other. Simon told a Norwalk Superior Court judge that he had a rare argument with his wife Saturday night at their home in New Canaan. A caller from the singers' home dialed 9-1-1 late in the evening Saturday and hung up, Police Chief Leon Krolikowski said at a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
A CHINESE actor's apology to his actress wife following rumors of his infidelity has set a record for comments and retweets on China's version of Twitter. There goes that stereotype about the Chinese working all day. The scandal surrounding film and TV star Wen Zhang has resonated among Chinese partly because of his image as a sensitive and happily married family man, and the volume of online comments underlines the relative freedom users have to focus on entertainment news online, where politics is often off-limits.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
AS THE LATEST on-screen incarnation of America's most iconic superhero, Superman, hits cineplexes this weekend, it's clear there is more at stake than the success of the movie, which seems guaranteed to be a hit on some level the same year "The Big Red S" turns 75. Indeed, "Man of Steel" will play a large part in shaping what we see - or don't see - in theaters for some time to come. DC Entertainment/Warner Brothers (hereafter referred to as DC/WB) has a lot at stake here and, with its rivals, will be waiting anxiously to see just how super "Man of Steel" is. First, there is the obvious.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S THE MARK of a great publicist when he or she can still place an item when the premise of that item is refuted in the very same item. For example, if we said, " Justin Timberlake plans to tour with One Direction " in our provocative lead but in the second paragraph said "but Timberlake's busy touring and movie schedule makes such a pairing unlikely," that would be a brilliant item. Totally bogus, but filled with search-word favorites for lots of Google clicks. That one we made up. This one we didn't.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you spot a lady outside the Barnes Foundation Thursday munching on a cheesesteak, you may want to ask for an autograph. It's probably Maria Semple, author of Where'd You Go, Bernadette , one of the funniest, most wondrous novels of recent years. Semple is here for a reading Thursday night at the the Free Library of Philadelphia, but she's making an effort to catch some local flavor in every city she stops in. In Philadelphia, that means sampling our sandwich staple and visiting the impressionist extravaganza on the Parkway.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013
The new novel from Inquirer columnist Lisa Scottoline, "Don't Go" (St. Martin's Press), is in bookstores now. Excerpts continue Wednesday in Style & Soul.     Chapter Two Mike raised the scalpel, about to make the first incision. He always said a prayer before he cut, though his wife Chloe was the religious one. She'd given him a silver crucifix before his deployment, and he kept it in his ACU pocket with a picture of their baby Emily. He was about to send up his homemade prayer when he noticed Joe Segundo, their administrative medical service officer, looking at him funny from across the OR. Mike returned his focus to his case, telescoping the task at hand and ignoring the anguished moans of the wounded, the constant talk of the docs and nurses, the whop whop whop of the Chinook outside, and the crack pop of ordnance in the distance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
CELEBRITIES cancel talk- show appearances for all types of reasons, but this is a new one: Singer/animal-rights activist Morrissey bailed on " Jimmy Kimmel Live" Tuesday night, because other guests were from the reality-TV show "Duck Dynasty. " Morrissey said he couldn't perform on a show with what he called people who "amount to animal serial killers. " "Duck Dynasty" follows a Louisiana family, the Robertsons, with a business selling duck calls and decoys. * Preparing for her reappearance on TV, is Barbara Walters , who called in to "The View" on Tuesday to report that she's returning to the show Monday.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|