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NEWS
May 14, 1994
State Sen. Chaka Fattah won a resounding victory in Tuesday's Democratic primary over incumbent Lucien Blackwell by beating the party bosses and the 30-second spot. The relatively young policy wonk touted his sound accomplishments and visionary ideas, and he put a fresh, savvy political organization on the streets to carry his message. People got it. Philadelphia voters, who were understandably disappointed when they lost the congressional force of former U.S. Rep. William Gray 3d in 1991, found a worthy replacement.
NEWS
June 3, 1989
Sure, to be a "star," you need the artistic or athletic skills that set you above the countless others who wish they could be stars. But there's more to it than talent - it's an attitude expressed this week by two very disparate performers. Riccardo Muti on his Philadelphia Orchestra: "The players want to be good, to prove to themselves that they are good . . . Being with this orchestra when it plays this way night after night is the reason for being in this profession. " Retired Phils star Tug McGraw on his career: "The best job in the world is to be a big-league . . . relief pitcher . . . You get to go to every game . . . and maybe two or three times a week they ask you to pitch a couple of innings.
NEWS
October 13, 1990
Say it ain't so, Lenny. It's unthinkable that somewhere in the world, Leonard Bernstein isn't conducting a concert. One of the most illustrious alumni of Philadelphia's Curtis Institute of Music, he is a musical superstar - thanks to his television charisma, the scope of his talents and his once-inexhaustible energy. It turns out, though, that this energy isn't inexhaustible. Battling respiratory ailments, the 72-year-old Bernstein has hung up his baton. Bernstein plans to continue composing (he's created "West Side Story," "On the Town" and an extensive symphonic repertoire)
SPORTS
April 29, 2011 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
VILLANOVA WAS the favorite. Not only to win the race, but perhaps even to challenge a 24-year-old world record set by another group of Wildcats at these same Penn Relays. But sometimes the storyline doesn't turn out to be as much about who takes the victory lap as how it unfolds. This was one of those instances. The Distance Medley Relay is the marquee event of the Carnival's opening day, even if it did start some 90 minutes late because of lightning delays. Yet as far as the Wildcats - who'd recently hoisted the hardware at the NCAA indoor championships in program-record time - were concerned, it was over before things ever had a chance to get interesting.
SPORTS
April 29, 2001 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His grip is almost as good as his stride. Track phenom and part-time souvenir collector Alan Webb proved that yesterday at the Penn Relays. Just minutes after he helped South Lakes High of Virginia win the Championship of America 4x800-meter relay in 7 minutes, 41.75 seconds at Franklin Field, Webb tried to leave the track with the red-and-blue baton as a memento. Unfortunately for Webb, a meet official spotted the booty first and tried to pry it from his hands. Webb gripped it tightly.
SPORTS
May 26, 1986 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn State and Villanova turned the IC4A track and field championships into their own private dual meet yesterday and produced one of the most bizarre finishes in the 110-year history of the meet. Surviving a daylong scoring assault by the Wildcats, plus the loss of sprinter-hurdler Michael Timpson, Penn State edged Villanova, 69-68, for its fifth IC4A title overall and its first since 1974. Maryland finished third with 42 points, while George Mason, the 1985 champion, was fourth with 38. They were followed, in order, by Boston University with 34, Princeton with 32, East Carolina with 31, Iona with 29, Manhattan and James Madison with 28 each and Dartmouth with 24. But while the IC4A cast included 58 schools and 850 athletes, three of whom broke meet records, the focal point was the Penn State-Villanova battle - a matchup between the Lions' quantity and the Wildcats' quality.
SPORTS
April 18, 2004 | By Josh Egerman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
His legs carried him across an ocean and around the world. They took him from Ireland to the United States. They sent him to Los Angeles and Seoul, to Barcelona and Atlanta for the Olympic Games. At each stop, and hundreds more in between, the world's best milers waited for him. But for all the places Marcus O'Sullivan has been, and all the miles he traveled looking to run four perfect laps around a track, the former Villanova standout - and current head coach - remembers finding his biggest athletic challenge close to his adopted home.
SPORTS
April 22, 2007 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 113th edition of the Penn Relays take place this week - the decathlon and heptathlon begin on Tuesday - so track and field athletes across the nation are preparing to descend on Franklin Field. But no team, not the University of Texas men nor the powerful South Carolina women, is more anxious to hit the track than the Pleasantville High School 4x800-meter relay team. The Greyhounds, who inexplicably dropped the baton in last year's Championship of America final, are determined to erase their yearlong nightmare.
SPORTS
April 27, 2002 | By Ron Reid INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the 14th time in 21 seasons, those repetitious runners from Arkansas captured the distance-medley relay yesterday in the 108th Penn Relays track and field carnival. But it was Villanova losing its grip, more than the Razorbacks' continued dominance, that left the sun-baked Franklin Field crowd of 39,104 baffled by the bizarre nature of the event. For the record, the Arkansas foursome of Dan Lincoln, Robbie Stewart, Chris Mulvaney and Alistair Cragg got to the finish line nine meters ahead of runner-up Stanford, to win in 9 minutes, 31.21 seconds.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Conductors are discovering competition coming up, literally, from behind their backs and over their shoulders. One after another, violinists have claimed music-director positions and guest-conducting engagements in some of the world's better orchestras. Leading from the concertmaster's chair, they don't necessarily hold a baton or reap the glory of their more Bernsteinian colleagues. But they're changing how music is made — and, perhaps, how it's heard. "Each player has enormous responsibility," says violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, who is in her fourth season as music director of the New Century Chamber Orchestra in San Francisco.
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NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Michael Boren, STAFF WRITER
Bob Ossler's brain was fried. His body, crisped. The unforgiving sun of a Louisiana summer had drained him. The police chaplain from Millville, Cumberland County, had prayed with hundreds of law enforcement officials since he arrived Sunday in Baton Rouge, where a gunman had killed three officers in an ambush. But the fatigue didn't stop Ossler. When a group of officers waved him over Wednesday — where they came from he does not know; "I see badges and I pray" — he put his hands on their shoulders and read from Psalm 23. Even the toughest officers began choking up, he said.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A national spokesman for the Moorish Science Temple of America said his religious group should not be confused with other Moorish groups that some news outlets have linked to Baton Rouge, La., police shooter Gavin Long. "Regarding the shooter in Baton Rouge, he has no affiliation or ties with the Moorish Science Temple of America," Azeem Hopkins-Bey, 36, grand sheik of the temple at 2559 N. Fifth St. in North Philadelphia, said at a news conference Monday outside City Hall. "In fact, his ideologies and his actions are diametrically opposed to [our]
NEWS
July 8, 2016
IN HER COLUMN on Thursday, "We've Seen Bitter Days," Helen Ubinas said it right. Her words are an example of what's wrong with society. I read: "I had returned from vacation ready to write a column about 16-year-old Asir Brown, gunned down in a drive-by shooting in Grays Ferry on July Fourth weekend. "But then I turned to one of the televisions in the newsroom and watched the emotional news conference outside Baton Rouge city hall, and there he was . . . " And so, you made the decision to chalk up Brown's tragic death and completely ignore it, and write instead about Alton Sterling, the 37-year-old CD street vendor who was shot and killed by police in Baton Rouge, La. Once again, you are trying to divide.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
CAMERON STERLING stood next to his mother in Baton Rouge, La., as she spoke of how police had killed his father. The new man of the house, 15 years old, tried to stand strong, but he did what any child would do. He wept. He buried his face in his shirt, and then in someone's chest, and he sobbed: "I want my Daddy. " I had returned from vacation ready to write a column about 16-year-old Asir Brown , gunned down in a drive-by shooting in Grays Ferry on July Fourth weekend. But then I turned to one of the televisions in the newsroom and watched the emotional news conference outside Baton Rouge city hall, and there he was: A young man broken in ways that he's only just beginning to realize.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
He got home after more than 10 hours in a jail cell, his eye as swollen and purple as a ripened plum, his scalp a patchwork of stitches from the police officers' batons, and he took a shower to wash away the blood. He had to get to work. As bad as he looked, as bad as he felt, Najee Rivera did not want to miss a shift at the hospital. His girlfriend, Dina Scannapieco, had found him the job. She worked at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia as a nurse. She had seen the listing on the website.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By Stephanie Farr, Daily News Staff Writer
SICILY MILLIGAN was 9 years old and by mom Beverley's side at Mount Airy Church of God in Christ when the policeman spoke to their congregation. "He said, 'We're looking for police officers and I'll be standing at the back door when service is over, just handing out applications,'" Beverley Milligan recalled. Neither mother nor daughter thought much of the policeman's short speech at the pulpit that day, but when they left church, something made Beverley raise her hand and take an application.
SPORTS
April 28, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Jamaican fans who filled Franklin Field's north bleachers fell quiet. An instant earlier they had waved their flags and cheered wildly, urging on the island's anchor in the men's 4x100-meter relay. Saturday afternoon's finish was too close for the crowd to determine. The Jamaicans waited for the USA vs. the World results to post on the infield scoreboard. For the third-straight year, their spirits were crushed: The U.S. team edged Jamaica by just one-hundredth of a second. Walter Dix, the American anchor, blazed the final stretch and passed Oshane Bailey just before finishing.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - When Matt Freeman said he wanted to become the feature baton twirler for Pennsylvania State University, his high school principal in southern California laughed and told him he needed realistic dreams. "I have proved him wrong in everything he's ever told me," Freeman said. For 31/2 years, Freeman - six times a world champion - has dazzled crowds at Beaver Stadium as feature twirler for the Penn State Blue Band. He twirls five batons at once, tosses them high, rolls them on his neck and bounces them like boomerangs.
SPORTS
August 20, 2013 | By Elliott Denman, For The Inquirer
MOSCOW - Brilliant baton-passing was the key to Team USA's world-record 40.82-second women's 4x100-meter relay triumph at the 2012 London Olympic Games. Hoping for a reprise on the concluding day of the 14th World Championships of Track and Field, a completely new American quartet got no such thing Sunday at Luzhniki Stadium. With a mistimed second exchange between second runner Alexandria Anderson of Austin, Texas, and English Gardner of Voorhees running third, the Americans lost critical ground and momentum to front-running Jamaica and appeared to have wound up third in 42.75, behind Jamaica's winning 41.29, a World Championships record, and France's silver-medal 42.73.
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