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NEWS
July 30, 2001 | New York Daily News
Three-year-old Harry Branch-Shaw really, really had to pee. So he did what most kids his age would do - he found a tree and let go. Then a city parks officer did what most cops wouldn't: He gave the tyke a $50 summons. Actually, Harry isn't old enough to get a summons, so the cop gave it to his nanny instead. "The whole thing seems so absurd," said mom Gigi Branch-Shaw. "I would've thought the city would have better things to worry about. " The pee-pee crime spree unfolded after breakfast Friday when Harry and a friend decided to have a play date on a sparkling summer day. Nannies in tow, the two buddies headed for the kids' paradise of Rockefeller Park just north of Battery Park City about 11:15 a.m. Harry is potty trained, but all the excitement must've made him ignore nature's warning signs.
NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It's been almost a decade since Philadelphia started a long-overdue conversation about transforming the vacant acres along the Delaware River into a vital urban neighborhood. Yet, other than a single, suburban-style casino and some lonely high-rise condos, little change is visible on that bleak, postindustrial landscape. The city now appears ready to stop talking and start doing. After four decades of false starts and scattershot projects, consultants are putting the finishing touches on a detailed and focused master plan that will provide Philadelphia with step-by-step instructions for reinventing its waterfront.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | By WITOLD RYBCZYNSKI
A PLAN IS NEEDED for the World Trade Center site - but not a big plan. There are times for building Central Park, and there are times for remedial gardening. Lower Manhattan should not be remade according to some new grand vision. A framework needs to be put in place and some principles agreed on, and city life will take its course. "There's no rush" is a phrase often heard in discussions of the site. Actually, there is a rush, because there is a reason why most cities struck by disaster - natural or man-made - generally end up rebuilding more or less what was there before.
NEWS
March 25, 2004
Here are a few of the things Gary Hack has done in his career: He was the urban planner behind the winning design for rebuilding ground zero in Manhattan. He also helped plan Battery Park City in lower Manhattan. The Boston mayor recently invited him to serve on an elite panel that will help decide how to remake that city in the wake of its "Big Dig" project. In his day job, he is dean of the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. Last year, he spurred the public process on the future of Penn's Landing that produced a set of citizen-crafted principles for developing Philadelphia's central waterfront.
NEWS
March 21, 2003 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Robert Mitchell Hanna, 67, a Philadelphia landscape architect who believed that elegant, user-friendly public spaces could make cities more vital, died March 8 after complications from surgery. A memorial service is scheduled for 4 p.m. tomorrow at Trinity Center for Urban Life, 22d and Spruce Streets. In recent years, Mr. Hanna operated the small RM Hanna design firm in his Center City home, but he was best known for his two-decade collaboration with local landscape architect Laurie C. Olin.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | BY HARRIS ECKSTUT
As a small business owner in Philadelphia whose life has been dramatically affected by urban planners, I would like to respond to Edmund Bacon's July 17 article, "Visions of Philadelphia. " I have a great deal of respect for urban planners. I believe Edmund Bacon has done wonders for Philadelphia - I do remember the Chinese Wall. And my brother is world renowned for being the co-designer of Battery Park City in Manhattan. But one cannot legislate progress and growth. The eastern European countries proved that, during the period between the end of World War II and the end of the Cold War. Small businesses employ over 85 percent of the workers in this city.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - After the Sept. 11 attacks, there were grim questions about the future of the shaken, dust-covered neighborhoods around the World Trade Center. Would residents flee uptown or to the suburbs? Who would want to live so close to a place associated with such horror? As it turns out, plenty of folks. Census figures released last week show that the number of people living near ground zero has swelled by 23,000 since 2000, making it one of the fastest-growing places in the city.
NEWS
August 31, 2002 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many of the improvised sidewalk shrines are gone, but the American flags remain - on subway cars and fire engines, on building walls and in store windows. Approaching the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, New Yorkers appear to be determinedly going about life's routines, though reminders of the World Trade Center's destruction surround them. Mayor Michael Bloomberg still attends memorial services for firefighters whose remains have just been identified; two were held on one recent day. Signs on public transit direct stressed city residents to free counseling services.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | By Henry Goldman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than a year, it lay hidden, wrapped in a crude satchel of brown paper and stashed in the cellar of a synagogue in Nazi-occupied Budapest. This week, unfolded and bathed in light, it was seen by thousands: a 30-foot tableau of richly painted biblical scenes on canvas that once stretched across the walls of a family's shelter, or sukkah, erected for the Jewish harvest festival of Sukkoth, in prewar Hungary. It's one of thousands of artifacts, heirlooms, snapshots and film clips displayed inside a new Museum of Jewish Heritage - a Living Memorial to the Holocaust that opened this week and that depicts Jewish cultural life before, during and after the Holocaust.
NEWS
April 30, 1989 | By Rick Lyman, Inquirer Staff Writer
New York Harbor was choppy and pallid yesterday as a 13-ship "presidential flotilla" pushed through the Verrazano Narrows, commencing a weekend of celebrations surrounding the bicentennial of George Washington's inauguration. President Bush is to address the nation just after 12:30 p.m. today - the 101st day of his presidency - from the steps of Federal Hall in lower Manhattan, where Washington took the oath of office in 1789. The weekend's activities are to also include a massive fireworks display, a scholarly symposium, a parade up Broadway, a breakfast for the descendants of all the presidents and a black-tie President's Ball at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel.
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TRAVEL
February 19, 2012 | By Beth J. Harpaz, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Museums and historic sites, and a trendy new Tribeca restaurant inspired by an old-school Catskills resort. They're all part of Jewish New York, with a heritage that stretches back 400 years and a vital contemporary community that's reinterpreting old traditions for the 21st century. New York City has the largest concentration of Jews in the world outside of Israel, according to the Jewish Databank, which put the city's Jewish population at 1.4 million in 2002. The stories of European Jews who arrived in the late 19th and early 20th centuries are relatively well-known and easy to find in places such as the Lower East Side.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By David B. Caruso, Associated Press
NEW YORK - After the Sept. 11 attacks, there were grim questions about the future of the shaken, dust-covered neighborhoods around the World Trade Center. Would residents flee uptown or to the suburbs? Who would want to live so close to a place associated with such horror? As it turns out, plenty of folks. Census figures released last week show that the number of people living near ground zero has swelled by 23,000 since 2000, making it one of the fastest-growing places in the city.
NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It's been almost a decade since Philadelphia started a long-overdue conversation about transforming the vacant acres along the Delaware River into a vital urban neighborhood. Yet, other than a single, suburban-style casino and some lonely high-rise condos, little change is visible on that bleak, postindustrial landscape. The city now appears ready to stop talking and start doing. After four decades of false starts and scattershot projects, consultants are putting the finishing touches on a detailed and focused master plan that will provide Philadelphia with step-by-step instructions for reinventing its waterfront.
NEWS
October 24, 2006 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a recent evening, New Yorkers let go. They saluted the setting sun, savored dinner with wine, whizzed by on their bikes, cast fishing lines, and strolled grassy boardwalks - all on the banks of the Hudson River. Just a few years ago, much of this land lay abandoned, a reliquary of the city's long-gone industrial era, its once-bustling ports and railroad lines supplanted by cheap parking spaces and squatters' shanties. But thanks to roughly three decades of civic planning and ardent battle, New York has reclaimed huge portions of both its riverfronts with a new 32-mile path around Manhattan, 20 of them on the water.
NEWS
March 25, 2004
Here are a few of the things Gary Hack has done in his career: He was the urban planner behind the winning design for rebuilding ground zero in Manhattan. He also helped plan Battery Park City in lower Manhattan. The Boston mayor recently invited him to serve on an elite panel that will help decide how to remake that city in the wake of its "Big Dig" project. In his day job, he is dean of the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. Last year, he spurred the public process on the future of Penn's Landing that produced a set of citizen-crafted principles for developing Philadelphia's central waterfront.
NEWS
March 21, 2003 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Robert Mitchell Hanna, 67, a Philadelphia landscape architect who believed that elegant, user-friendly public spaces could make cities more vital, died March 8 after complications from surgery. A memorial service is scheduled for 4 p.m. tomorrow at Trinity Center for Urban Life, 22d and Spruce Streets. In recent years, Mr. Hanna operated the small RM Hanna design firm in his Center City home, but he was best known for his two-decade collaboration with local landscape architect Laurie C. Olin.
NEWS
August 31, 2002 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many of the improvised sidewalk shrines are gone, but the American flags remain - on subway cars and fire engines, on building walls and in store windows. Approaching the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, New Yorkers appear to be determinedly going about life's routines, though reminders of the World Trade Center's destruction surround them. Mayor Michael Bloomberg still attends memorial services for firefighters whose remains have just been identified; two were held on one recent day. Signs on public transit direct stressed city residents to free counseling services.
NEWS
March 27, 2002 | By WITOLD RYBCZYNSKI
A PLAN IS NEEDED for the World Trade Center site - but not a big plan. There are times for building Central Park, and there are times for remedial gardening. Lower Manhattan should not be remade according to some new grand vision. A framework needs to be put in place and some principles agreed on, and city life will take its course. "There's no rush" is a phrase often heard in discussions of the site. Actually, there is a rush, because there is a reason why most cities struck by disaster - natural or man-made - generally end up rebuilding more or less what was there before.
NEWS
September 24, 2001 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wall Street workers huddled in Manhattan hotel rooms, fled to offices in New Jersey, and filled glitzy space only recently vacated by failed dot-coms to get the world's financial markets running last week. It worked, but the economic fallout from the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 translated into one of the stock markets' worst drops ever, and investors and analysts are preparing for another rough week on Wall Street. Beyond the immediate uncertainty, New York is scrambling to hold on to its title as the world's financial center and to the lucrative jobs and economic development that go with it. The city already is examining ways to rebuild Lower Manhattan, including establishing a redevelopment commission for the financial district that will be part of a rebuilding effort costing upwards of $20 billion.
NEWS
September 12, 2001 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Life changed fast and forever yesterday morning, when an unseen terrorist hand guided two planes into the twin towers of the World Trade Center, collapsing the symbols of New York City's commercial and cultural greatness. Now there is smoke where there once was steel, shocked silence where a self-assured populace once ran America's most dynamic city. Casualties were expected to be in the thousands, as the attack rocked what amounts to two vertical cities. By nightfall, an unsettling quiet permeated Lower Manhattan from Soho, to Chinatown, to Greenwich Village.
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