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NEWS
March 19, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Despite multimillion-dollar efforts to restore its Civil War landscape, Gettysburg battlefield has again been designated an endangered landmark. The Civil War Preservation Trust placed the battlefield on its top-10 endangered list - for the fourth time in nine years - because of concern over encroachment on two sides: tourism-related development to the east near the new visitor center, and the uncertain fate of a 130-acre, bankrupt country club on the west. Both areas were scenes of notable clashes during the 1863 battle but are not protected from development.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | by Richard Aregood, Daily News Staff Writer
There are at least two Gettysburgs. There's the one that happens every year on the anniversary of the battle. People who have driven from Indiana with all five kids in the car swarm over the battlefield, buying souvenirs and T-shirts, while serious collectors dicker over Maxwell House canfuls of Minie balls. It's a magnificent festival. The rest of the time, the battlefield is a different place - a near- churchlike place of reverent consideration of history. Standing at the top or bottom of the hill that once was covered with the bodies of those who made Pickett's charge brings reflections on bravery, honor, duty and the waste of life that would bring a tear to the coldest eye. I often sit at the bottom of Little Round Top, where my great-grandfather's Alabama regiment tried, on the second day, to dislodge the Maine heroes who had beaten them to it. That hill looks impossible to climb on a beautiful fall day without pack or musket and especially without angry folks at the top shooting down.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - For a moment, the line was quiet. As the sun beat down on the field, a row of men dressed in gray adjusted muskets, hoisted flags, and wiped sweat from their foreheads. Then, with a whoop, they were off across the field, followed by ranks and ranks behind them. But the majority of the crowd sprinting across the battlefield Wednesday afternoon was decidedly and defiantly anachronistic: middle-aged men in T-shirts, children riding on parents' shoulders, young women in sundresses, and more than a few amateur photographers with cellphone cameras.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with what Union and Confederate soldiers suffered those three deadly days in July 1863, conditions on the Gettysburg battlefield were a dream for these troops. The temperature was a no-jacket-required 72 degrees. Food was plentiful. Suffering amounted to sore feet and low cellphone batteries by the time Ed Ruggero and his brigade concluded their daylong assault at McPherson Ridge, the Peach Orchard, Little Round Top, and the site of Pickett's Charge. Then again, this mission was not to conquer and destroy, it was how to lead in 21st-century corporate America.
TRAVEL
September 3, 2012 | By Nancy Nussbaum, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - A twig snaps and brush rustles in woods on the Gettysburg battlefield. My horse does not flinch. It's nothing more than a small animal scurrying away. But on a hot summer day nearly 150 years earlier, it could have been the enemy. The rolling farmland that is Gettysburg can be toured in a number of ways, but on horseback you can transport yourself to the vantage and vulnerability of a Civil War officer on horseback directing his troops in the three-day battle. On a recent family trip, my husband, our daughters, ages 9 and 14, and I toured the battlefields on horseback with a licensed Gettysburg battlefield guide.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
By Mark Edward Lender Our country just marked the 240th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence with the customary parades, fireworks, and family gatherings that have become American traditions. As welcome as these celebrations are, we should take a few moments to reflect upon the fact that - just 50 miles from Independence Hall, where that momentous document was signed - a modern academic institution is destroying the battlefield where the declaration's lofty ideals were secured by our nation's first soldiers.
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of an elite corps of Civil War historians who take visitors on in-depth tours of the Gettysburg battlefield claim new rules being imposed by the National Park Service will threaten their nearly century-old organization. The park service, as part of its reorganization ahead of the opening of the battlefield's new visitor center in April, established a new tour schedule and reservation system and changed how and when the licensed battlefield guides get paid. The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides says the new system effectively ends their ability to control their work schedules and will reduce the number of tours they give.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - During the monumental battle fought here 150 years ago, Powers Hill played a key role as a signal station and artillery position guarding the main route to Washington. Over time the fields turned to forest and few visitors made the short trek up the boulder-filled hill at the southeastern corner of Gettysburg National Military Park for the view. Because there wasn't one. Before last year you could not see the battlefield for the trees. Today, after trees have been clear-cut, a nonhistoric house demolished, and a small parcel of land purchased, a visitor can stand beside the boulders, look out across the Baltimore Pike clear over to Culp's Hill and understand exactly what was at stake.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The Gettysburg Cyclorama building is history. In a cloud of concrete dust, the 50-year-old battlefield landmark came tumbling down Saturday after a 14-year struggle over its fate. At once reviled by Civil War buffs and beloved by fans of modern architecture, the circular structure, designed by the world-famous architect Richard Neutra, was built to house the massive Cyclorama painting depicting the most important moment of the Battle of Gettysburg. By design, it occupied a prime piece of real estate on the battlefield, marking the Union line on Cemetery Ridge where Northern troops repelled Confederate forces during the climactic clash known as Pickett's Charge on the battle's final day, July 3, 1863.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Supporters of the Paoli Battlefield are a step closer to persuading Washington to designate the Main Line site - an encampment that swam in patriot blood on a September night in 1777 - a national historic landmark. The research and documentation they submitted have put the 40-acre Chester County tract into contention for the nation's highest historic designation, according to the National Park Service's National Historic Landmark Program and the American Battlefield Protection Program.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
By Mark Edward Lender Our country just marked the 240th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence with the customary parades, fireworks, and family gatherings that have become American traditions. As welcome as these celebrations are, we should take a few moments to reflect upon the fact that - just 50 miles from Independence Hall, where that momentous document was signed - a modern academic institution is destroying the battlefield where the declaration's lofty ideals were secured by our nation's first soldiers.
NEWS
May 31, 2016
By Seymour I. "Spence" Toll As Memorial Day has evolved since the Civil War, our nation celebrates it to remember and honor those who died while serving in the armed forces. At the national level, the service itself is more important than the cause. It doesn't matter if the sacrifices were made during World Wars I and II, in Korea and Vietnam, or in Iraq and Afghanistan. Whenever and wherever those deaths occurred, they offer a unifying theme of the spirit: Honor those whose service cost their lives.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compared with what Union and Confederate soldiers suffered those three deadly days in July 1863, conditions on the Gettysburg battlefield were a dream for these troops. The temperature was a no-jacket-required 72 degrees. Food was plentiful. Suffering amounted to sore feet and low cellphone batteries by the time Ed Ruggero and his brigade concluded their daylong assault at McPherson Ridge, the Peach Orchard, Little Round Top, and the site of Pickett's Charge. Then again, this mission was not to conquer and destroy, it was how to lead in 21st-century corporate America.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By David Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a blood-soaked battlefield in colonial New Jersey, a lone preacher stood tall, attempting to bring solace to his embattled compatriots. This is the pose that master sculptor Roger Wing chose for a monument at Old Pine Street Church to honor the Rev. George Duffield, a Revolutionary War preacher, co-chaplain to the Continental Congress, minister to the Pennsylvania militia, and editor of the first American Bible. Duffield led the institution at Fourth and Pine Streets that was known as the Church of the Patriots, thanks to his fiery sermons preaching no taxation without representation.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The land is not particularly unusual. The 4.6 acres include a ridgeline, slope, wooded area, and open ground. What gives the tract value is the history that unfolded around it on Jan. 3, 1777, when Gen. George Washington helped rally American soldiers and turn the tide of battle against the British outside Princeton. Now the once-privately owned parcel is part of Princeton Battlefield State Park. Its acquisition for $850,000 will be marked at 10 a.m. Sept. 16 during public ribbon-cutting ceremonies at the Colonnade, on the north side of Mercer Street in the park.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce Knapp remembers learning about the Revolutionary War Battle of Paoli in his seventh-grade classroom in the San Francisco area. Years after he moved to Chester County as an adult, he joined a group that had successfully raised money to save the Paoli Battlefield, a pristine piece of Main Line property, from developers in the 1990s. Now, the retired federal investigator is leading the charge to get the National Park Service to recognize the site for what the community believes it is: a national historic landmark.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - The battle was hanging in the balance that January day in 1777 when Gen. George Washington boldly rode between the American and British lines to rally his soldiers. "Instantly, there was a roar of musketry followed by a shout," wrote an American colonel who was there. "It was the shout of victory. " Washington emerged from the smoke waving his hat and urging his soldiers on in pursuit of retreating Redcoats. Two hundred and thirty-eight years later, another counterattack is underway - focused on the same land where some historians say combat was fierce.
NEWS
December 24, 2014
SIX FAMILY members slaughtered by a Montgomery County man who then took his own life. One hundred forty-three, mostly children, killed in a Pakistan school by the Taliban. One hundred sixty-five children kidnapped in Nigeria by Boko Haram. Two New York police shot in cold blood. And that's just last week. The world is never exactly a sane place, but lately it seems that the madness has increased. Few corners of the world are free from strife, from unbearable tensions.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a breathless Jonas Cattell dashed into Fort Mercer that October day in 1777, the enemy wasn't far behind. Hours earlier, the 18-year-old had overheard talk of an attack on the American fort and ran the 10 miles from Haddonfield to Red Bank, Gloucester County, bypassing Hessian mercenaries along the way. His timely warning gave the American defenders time to reposition their artillery and set a trap that decimated the Hessians. About 400 of them - a third of the German force - were mowed down by cannon and musket fire, then buried in a mass grave at what is now Red Bank Battlefield Park.
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