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NEWS
March 19, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Despite multimillion-dollar efforts to restore its Civil War landscape, Gettysburg battlefield has again been designated an endangered landmark. The Civil War Preservation Trust placed the battlefield on its top-10 endangered list - for the fourth time in nine years - because of concern over encroachment on two sides: tourism-related development to the east near the new visitor center, and the uncertain fate of a 130-acre, bankrupt country club on the west. Both areas were scenes of notable clashes during the 1863 battle but are not protected from development.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | by Richard Aregood, Daily News Staff Writer
There are at least two Gettysburgs. There's the one that happens every year on the anniversary of the battle. People who have driven from Indiana with all five kids in the car swarm over the battlefield, buying souvenirs and T-shirts, while serious collectors dicker over Maxwell House canfuls of Minie balls. It's a magnificent festival. The rest of the time, the battlefield is a different place - a near- churchlike place of reverent consideration of history. Standing at the top or bottom of the hill that once was covered with the bodies of those who made Pickett's charge brings reflections on bravery, honor, duty and the waste of life that would bring a tear to the coldest eye. I often sit at the bottom of Little Round Top, where my great-grandfather's Alabama regiment tried, on the second day, to dislodge the Maine heroes who had beaten them to it. That hill looks impossible to climb on a beautiful fall day without pack or musket and especially without angry folks at the top shooting down.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - For a moment, the line was quiet. As the sun beat down on the field, a row of men dressed in gray adjusted muskets, hoisted flags, and wiped sweat from their foreheads. Then, with a whoop, they were off across the field, followed by ranks and ranks behind them. But the majority of the crowd sprinting across the battlefield Wednesday afternoon was decidedly and defiantly anachronistic: middle-aged men in T-shirts, children riding on parents' shoulders, young women in sundresses, and more than a few amateur photographers with cellphone cameras.
TRAVEL
September 3, 2012 | By Nancy Nussbaum, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - A twig snaps and brush rustles in woods on the Gettysburg battlefield. My horse does not flinch. It's nothing more than a small animal scurrying away. But on a hot summer day nearly 150 years earlier, it could have been the enemy. The rolling farmland that is Gettysburg can be toured in a number of ways, but on horseback you can transport yourself to the vantage and vulnerability of a Civil War officer on horseback directing his troops in the three-day battle. On a recent family trip, my husband, our daughters, ages 9 and 14, and I toured the battlefields on horseback with a licensed Gettysburg battlefield guide.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - During the monumental battle fought here 150 years ago, Powers Hill played a key role as a signal station and artillery position guarding the main route to Washington. Over time the fields turned to forest and few visitors made the short trek up the boulder-filled hill at the southeastern corner of Gettysburg National Military Park for the view. Because there wasn't one. Before last year you could not see the battlefield for the trees. Today, after trees have been clear-cut, a nonhistoric house demolished, and a small parcel of land purchased, a visitor can stand beside the boulders, look out across the Baltimore Pike clear over to Culp's Hill and understand exactly what was at stake.
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of an elite corps of Civil War historians who take visitors on in-depth tours of the Gettysburg battlefield claim new rules being imposed by the National Park Service will threaten their nearly century-old organization. The park service, as part of its reorganization ahead of the opening of the battlefield's new visitor center in April, established a new tour schedule and reservation system and changed how and when the licensed battlefield guides get paid. The Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides says the new system effectively ends their ability to control their work schedules and will reduce the number of tours they give.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The Gettysburg Cyclorama building is history. In a cloud of concrete dust, the 50-year-old battlefield landmark came tumbling down Saturday after a 14-year struggle over its fate. At once reviled by Civil War buffs and beloved by fans of modern architecture, the circular structure, designed by the world-famous architect Richard Neutra, was built to house the massive Cyclorama painting depicting the most important moment of the Battle of Gettysburg. By design, it occupied a prime piece of real estate on the battlefield, marking the Union line on Cemetery Ridge where Northern troops repelled Confederate forces during the climactic clash known as Pickett's Charge on the battle's final day, July 3, 1863.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
A Lockheed Martin Corp. unit in Cherry Hill won a two-year, $13 million contract to develop a system that will allow military analysts to process battlefield information more quickly and accurately, the Bethesda, Md., company said. Lockheed's Advanced Technology Laboratories, which employs about 200 in Cherry Hill, will build the system with the help of another Lockheed Martin unit, Autonomous Systems; Object Video Inc. and the Georgia Tech Research Institute.    - Harold Brubaker
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bruce Knapp remembers learning about the Revolutionary War Battle of Paoli in his seventh-grade classroom in the San Francisco area. Years after he moved to Chester County as an adult, he joined a group that had successfully raised money to save the Paoli Battlefield, a pristine piece of Main Line property, from developers in the 1990s. Now, the retired federal investigator is leading the charge to get the National Park Service to recognize the site for what the community believes it is: a national historic landmark.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON - The battle was hanging in the balance that January day in 1777 when Gen. George Washington boldly rode between the American and British lines to rally his soldiers. "Instantly, there was a roar of musketry followed by a shout," wrote an American colonel who was there. "It was the shout of victory. " Washington emerged from the smoke waving his hat and urging his soldiers on in pursuit of retreating Redcoats. Two hundred and thirty-eight years later, another counterattack is underway - focused on the same land where some historians say combat was fierce.
NEWS
December 24, 2014
SIX FAMILY members slaughtered by a Montgomery County man who then took his own life. One hundred forty-three, mostly children, killed in a Pakistan school by the Taliban. One hundred sixty-five children kidnapped in Nigeria by Boko Haram. Two New York police shot in cold blood. And that's just last week. The world is never exactly a sane place, but lately it seems that the madness has increased. Few corners of the world are free from strife, from unbearable tensions.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a breathless Jonas Cattell dashed into Fort Mercer that October day in 1777, the enemy wasn't far behind. Hours earlier, the 18-year-old had overheard talk of an attack on the American fort and ran the 10 miles from Haddonfield to Red Bank, Gloucester County, bypassing Hessian mercenaries along the way. His timely warning gave the American defenders time to reposition their artillery and set a trap that decimated the Hessians. About 400 of them - a third of the German force - were mowed down by cannon and musket fire, then buried in a mass grave at what is now Red Bank Battlefield Park.
NEWS
January 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON Finding a way to make the two sides happy is going to take an Einstein. When the Institute for Advanced Study gained a planning board's approval in 2012 for a faculty housing project on its land next to Princeton Battlefield State Park, opponents vowed to fight on. This month, they won the next round, after arguing that the project would cut off surface water to wetlands on the site and disturb ground where George Washington led...
TRAVEL
November 11, 2013 | By Robin B. Smith, For The Inquirer
NORMANDY, France - At dawn on June 6, 1944, Allied forces landed on the northern coast of France, and June will mark the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the World War II military operation against the German march to dominate Europe, which began with American, British, and Canadian sacrifices of a magnitude unimaginable to all but survivors of infantry and invasion warfare. A visit to the Normandy beaches, invasion sites, and cemeteries is an opportunity to appreciate today's freedom by honoring not only the soldiers who died but also the survivors - and to attempt to grasp the horror of war by seeing the battlefields and mind-numbing rows of headstones.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a soldier died on a Civil War battlefield, it was often a long way to the family burial ground. If it was too long, and the weather was warm, well - perhaps the less said, the better. Unless, of course, you are Anna Dhody, curator at the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Just in time for Halloween, Dhody is speaking at the Wagner Free Institute of Science on Wednesday evening on a macabre subject: the history of embalming in the United States.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - Stare hard at a line of soldiers marching to the battlefield reenactments here, and you'll likely spot a ponytail or two tucked under an infantryman's cap. "There are a lot of girl soldiers here," said Courtney Yoder, 17, clad in Union blue. "You just have to look for them. " Hundreds of women did fight incognito in the Civil War, and thousands more supported troops on the home front or at the battlefield, cooking or working for field hospitals and aid societies.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - For a moment, the line was quiet. As the sun beat down on the field, a row of men dressed in gray adjusted muskets, hoisted flags, and wiped sweat from their foreheads. Then, with a whoop, they were off across the field, followed by ranks and ranks behind them. But the majority of the crowd sprinting across the battlefield Wednesday afternoon was decidedly and defiantly anachronistic: middle-aged men in T-shirts, children riding on parents' shoulders, young women in sundresses, and more than a few amateur photographers with cellphone cameras.
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