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Bay Window

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NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
A bay window protruding from a house in Nether Providence Township has created a small problem for a township man who wants to subdivide his property and sell half of it. Steven Maxwell wants to split his property of less than one acre on 207 Willow Rd. into two lots of nearly equal size. One house sits on the site. The subdivided lot with the house falls one foot short of the township's aggregate side-yard requirement of 16 feet - a shortfall created by the protruding window.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
Scott Moss wants to build a Victorian house with a bay window and four-foot porches on his property at 531 Oak Rd. in Merion, but his plans have been put on hold. Prompted by opposition from neighbors concerned with everything from neighborhood aesthetics to sewer drainage, the Lower Merion Zoning Hearing Board on Thursday voted to continue Moss' application. "What we want to know, in layman's terms, is, 'Is there a water problem there or not a water problem?' " board member Morris C. Kellett said.
NEWS
January 18, 2004 | By Michael Walsh FOR THE INQUIRER
Keeping America beautiful might be a good deal easier if architects, builders and their clients put a little more effort into choosing a variety of harmonious materials for home exteriors. The key word here is variety, and in many newer subdivisions there is precious little of it. Whether beige, gray, russet or sage, the result is the same - a community of relentless monotony, and houses that look monolithic and often too big for the lots they are on. Exterior materials - siding, masonry and roofing - can bring a house into harmony with its environment and its neighbors.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Inclement weather can be tough on man and beast, including birds of prey. Cold weather sends rabbits, mice and other vermin into hibernation, leaving the raptors hungry. To get by, especially when the ground is covered with snow, they will chase down other birds and feed on roadkill. As a consequence, they sometimes crash into buildings. Sometimes they become roadkill themselves. Wildlife experts say dozens of hawks and owls have died on area roads since the cold weather hit. Without their normal food source, the cunning and clever birds, usually admired from afar as they circle well above the tree line, feed on carcasses of animals killed by cars.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Between Oct. 28 and last Sunday, Mischief Night, at least 37 homeowners and car owners incurred thefts from their cars, BB pellets shot through car or bedroom windows, spray-painted cars and a number of miscellaneous incidents. "It's very, very excessive," said Township Police Sgt. James McCallister. "Usually, if we have two or three (mischief reports) in a 24-hour period, it's a lot. " The damage was in numerous areas of the township. Unlocked cars in the Briar Hills Farms section were ransacked; only a few items, such as a Swiss army knife and binoculars, were stolen.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phyllis D. Intenzo, 85, who with friends and family watched one of Philadelphia's great traditions pass by her bay window, died Sunday of complications associated with Alzheimer's disease at the home of a son in Haverford. Mrs. Intenzo lived in a brownstone at Broad and Moore Streets in South Philadelphia for 49 years, and every New Year's Day she would host a party so guests could watch the Mummers Parade. "It was a perfect view," said her granddaughter Joan Giresi. "We all used to sit in the window.
REAL_ESTATE
February 23, 1990 | By Frank Reeves, Special to The Inquirer
HEATON'S MILL Middletown Township, Bucks County 752-5426 Heaton's Mill, an upscale development in lower Bucks County, is said to be near the site where Robert Heat built the first grist mill in Middletown Township in the late 1600s. The grist mill has inspired the naming of Heaton's Mill and other developments in the area. Although the mill is gone now, at least one reminder of the area's rich history remains intact: a fieldstone farmhouse built in the early 1800s.
REAL_ESTATE
September 3, 1995 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sturbridge Estates, Voorhees, Camden County Luxury homes on wooded lots - just what the doctor ordered! Dr. Albert Belli, that is. Belli, a pulmonary specialist, and his wife, Joanne, were Sturbridge Estates' first buyers. "And two years down the road, we're very satisfied," Joanne Belli said. "We got what we wanted, absolutely!" What they wanted was more room (they were expecting their fourth child); an area away from highways; and neighbors with children. The secluded Voorhees Township site of Sturbridge Estates offered a beautifully treed community with courts boasting landscaped center islands.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kent Derry gazed up at his neighbor's burned-out window and winced. "I had the best chance of anyone," he said. "But I had no chance at all. " Early yesterday morning, he had clutched the arm of Bryant Laws, 4, with both hands for what seemed like five minutes as the fire closed in on the boy. But between the unconscious child and survival stood a wrought-iron grill. And Derry, 27, could not slip the boy through the bars on the second-floor window. "I kicked, I pulled, but I couldn't get the bars off," said the Germantown man. "There was nothing I could do. It started getting hot. Then the flames just came.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
April 27, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Clayton Clark knows exactly which step squeaks in his Moorestown home, and has for decades - the one he was careful to avoid if the hour was late. "It's wonderful - and a little strange - to come back and live in the same house where you lived as a child," says Clark, a Moorestown mortgage broker. He's pleased that now a third generation, daughter Annette, will learn its secrets. Clayton and wife, Anne, both 52, have deep roots in Moorestown: It's where they grew up, were part of the same high school crowd, became sweethearts, and, ultimately, spouses.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Sally Friedman and FOR THE INQUIRER
The Realtor, in her crisp navy suit, was delivering her practiced monologue about the virtues of a property when she swept us into the master suite.   I blinked at the panorama. We had stepped into a sun-splashed, blush world. A color mix of pink, beige, and peach was spread across the bedroom walls — the carpet perfectly matched — and a built-in platform bed angled on the wall seemed terribly sophisticated. The adjoining master bathroom was done up in white tile and mirrors.
NEWS
April 8, 2010 | By Kia gregory Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series. Carolyn McClary stands on her porch, near her bay window of lacy white curtains and silk flowers, and stares at the block's nemesis. Three doors down, at 1446 N. Conestoga St., strips of wood hang from the porch roof like streamers. The roof sags over broken windows. Raccoons take refuge. On the metal sheet of a door a notice warns: "Danger. Keep out. " No one has lived in the crumbling rowhouse on this narrow street in West Philadelphia's Carroll Park for 10 years, guesses McClary, the longtime block captain.
NEWS
January 18, 2004 | By Michael Walsh FOR THE INQUIRER
Keeping America beautiful might be a good deal easier if architects, builders and their clients put a little more effort into choosing a variety of harmonious materials for home exteriors. The key word here is variety, and in many newer subdivisions there is precious little of it. Whether beige, gray, russet or sage, the result is the same - a community of relentless monotony, and houses that look monolithic and often too big for the lots they are on. Exterior materials - siding, masonry and roofing - can bring a house into harmony with its environment and its neighbors.
NEWS
December 24, 2003
The Christmas express When I was about 8, I went into the cellar of our home in Jenkintown a few weeks before Christmas. Lying on my dad's cluttered workbench was a piece of paper with a rough, penciled diagram that included a figure eight. Trains. I shared my discovery with no one, not even my two younger brothers. Exciting? Yes, but I was too young to realize the volcano of financial stress bubbling through the heads of my parents and millions of others as they fought their way through the Great Depression.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Phyllis D. Intenzo, 85, who with friends and family watched one of Philadelphia's great traditions pass by her bay window, died Sunday of complications associated with Alzheimer's disease at the home of a son in Haverford. Mrs. Intenzo lived in a brownstone at Broad and Moore Streets in South Philadelphia for 49 years, and every New Year's Day she would host a party so guests could watch the Mummers Parade. "It was a perfect view," said her granddaughter Joan Giresi. "We all used to sit in the window.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Inclement weather can be tough on man and beast, including birds of prey. Cold weather sends rabbits, mice and other vermin into hibernation, leaving the raptors hungry. To get by, especially when the ground is covered with snow, they will chase down other birds and feed on roadkill. As a consequence, they sometimes crash into buildings. Sometimes they become roadkill themselves. Wildlife experts say dozens of hawks and owls have died on area roads since the cold weather hit. Without their normal food source, the cunning and clever birds, usually admired from afar as they circle well above the tree line, feed on carcasses of animals killed by cars.
LIVING
September 21, 1998 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Page Williams stopped wading in the Severn River and pulled up his net slowly, intently inspecting his catch. He was still for a moment and then he yelped in triumph. "We got a pike . . . oh, we got a pike!" Among the pumpkinseed sunfish, grass shrimp and Atlantic silverside minnows lay an eight-inch brown torpedo of a fish, a chain pickerel. Williams, senior naturalist for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, gingerly cradled the pickerel - frequently called a pike - in his palm.
REAL_ESTATE
September 3, 1995 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sturbridge Estates, Voorhees, Camden County Luxury homes on wooded lots - just what the doctor ordered! Dr. Albert Belli, that is. Belli, a pulmonary specialist, and his wife, Joanne, were Sturbridge Estates' first buyers. "And two years down the road, we're very satisfied," Joanne Belli said. "We got what we wanted, absolutely!" What they wanted was more room (they were expecting their fourth child); an area away from highways; and neighbors with children. The secluded Voorhees Township site of Sturbridge Estates offered a beautifully treed community with courts boasting landscaped center islands.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Between Oct. 28 and last Sunday, Mischief Night, at least 37 homeowners and car owners incurred thefts from their cars, BB pellets shot through car or bedroom windows, spray-painted cars and a number of miscellaneous incidents. "It's very, very excessive," said Township Police Sgt. James McCallister. "Usually, if we have two or three (mischief reports) in a 24-hour period, it's a lot. " The damage was in numerous areas of the township. Unlocked cars in the Briar Hills Farms section were ransacked; only a few items, such as a Swiss army knife and binoculars, were stolen.
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