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Bayard Rustin

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NEWS
November 15, 2002 | By Anthony Monteiro
Bayard Rustin was one of those persons who from an early age are comfortable in their skin. But he made many around him uncomfortable. Certainly his life has honored the community he grew up in and the high school from which he graduated as valedictorian. Along the way he was a star athlete, member of the French, history and science clubs, and of the school chorus. Rustin's career after high school, his commitment to peace, justice and civil and human rights, made of him one of the most important people of his generation.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Before the high school soccer season began in September, Bayard Rustin girls' coach Joe Corba felt he would be able to call it a successful season if his team finished with about as many victories as losses. All of the teams at Rustin made their competitive debuts this season for the newest high school in the West Chester Area School District. There would be no seniors on any Rustin athletic team. That was a decision made by the district to give seniors a chance to finish their school careers at West Chester East or West Chester Henderson, where they had been attending.
NEWS
December 10, 2002 | By William C. Kashatus
The recent controversy over naming a new high school after Bayard Rustin in the West Chester area is just one of many examples of political correctness in creating memorials to those who have shaped our past. Rustin, a onetime Communist Party member, conscientious objector, and gay civil rights pioneer, introduced the principle of nonviolence to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and made possible his "I Have A Dream" speech by helping to organize the 1963 march in Washington. But the local school board is reconsidering its earlier decision to name the new school after him. This has prompted several questions: Why do we discriminate against figures who don't exemplify traditional American values?
NEWS
February 21, 2003 | By Christopher Nicholson
The recent community debate in West Chester over the naming of a high school for activist Bayard Rustin brought back memories of my own brief participation in the area's civil rights struggle. I wasn't in big demonstrations, marching or holding placards. I didn't chain myself to buildings or fend off dogs with bared teeth. But for one day during the summer of 1946, I experienced a little of what it was like to be a black American when Rustin and I went to three restaurants in downtown West Chester and were denied service in all of them.
NEWS
November 15, 2002 | By Sarah Wesley
As an alumna of West Chester High School, I was excited when I heard that a new high school in our area would be named for Bayard Rustin, a West Chester native and social and political activist. What a deserving individual, I thought, someone who dedicated his life to human rights here and around the world. Now, I've heard that members of the West Chester Area School Board are reconsidering the decision, and I am concerned and disappointed. Didn't they research him before saying the school might bear his name?
NEWS
November 21, 2002 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A committee now wavering over its recommendation to name the new high school in Westtown after Bayard Rustin heard residents argue last night over whether parts of his life overshadowed his career as a civil-rights leader and role model. The school board has said that the debate has nothing to do with race, sexuality or politics, but those topics were front and center for the hearing, which lasted longer than its scheduled two hours. Rustin, a Quaker, went to prison after refusing to serve in the military during World War II. He was also gay. Last night's meeting at Stetson Middle School, the only public one scheduled so far for the High School Name Committee, was the first step in deciding whether the West Chester Area School District will use Rustin's name for the $67 million high school to be built in Westtown Township.
SPORTS
January 13, 2007 | By Jeff McLane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to their little brothers, big brothers have certain job expectations. Such as: helping little bro with his jump shot, or allowing little bro a little "smack" talk, or realizing when Mom and Dad are being run ragged while little bro doesn't. Big bro, however, is under no obligation to lose to little bro when their basketball teams face each other. In another consequence of growing suburban school districts and splitting schools, the White brothers of West Chester - Roger, Rondell and Rahmier - all played hoops Thursday night when West Chester Henderson hosted first-year school Bayard Rustin.
NEWS
September 16, 2007 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dan Ellis, who helped quarterback Downingtown to a PIAA Class AAAA football championship in 1996, says he always will be a "Downingtown person" but felt after last season that he needed a change from his position as an assistant coach at Downingtown East. So when Bayard Rustin assistant George Veneziale called him last November, asking whether he would be interested in a spot on the staff at the new high school, Ellis said yes. "I needed to move on," Ellis said. "I talked with [Rustin head coach]
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It will be like old times again when the community gathers to honor one of its native sons. Old times, because the man residents remember as a friend and leader - the late Bayard Rustin - had a special talent for drawing people together. "He never forgot his friends even after he was famous," Alice M. Thomas said of Rustin, who graduated from the former West Chester Area Joint Senior High School, now Henderson High School, and went on to become an international figure and leader in the civil rights movement in the 1960s.
NEWS
October 19, 2006
LETTER-WRITER Anna Rogers' anger is misdirected. She can't seem to separate gay people from sexual acts. Gay History Month has no more to do with sex than Black History Month. The aim is to deal with gay people in history like Tennessee Williams, Martina Navratilova, Alexander the Great, Bayard Rustin, Rep. Barney Frank, Walt Whitman, Leonardo da Vinci, Oscar Wilde, Gertrude Stein and thousands of others. As for gay struggles being compared to the struggle of black people, there is a communality.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
He suffered it in the Warner Theater, where black people were restricted to the balcony, and at the YMCA, where the young and athletic Bayard Rustin couldn't play. In West Chester, a town that was once a stop on the Underground Railroad, the civil rights legend, named this month to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, had his first encounters with inequality. But the Chester County borough of 18,000 people also was where Rustin learned the Quaker principles that would propel his activism.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
Dick Polman ("Obama needs just a bit of Truman's courage," Sunday) is right. President Obama needs to combine courage, justice, and pragmatism in eliminating "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," so that gay and lesbian military personnel aren't eliminated from providing their voluntary and valuable service to our nation. Perhaps Obama needs an A. Philip Randolph, the onetime newspaper editor and longtime labor leader who successfully nudged President Roosevelt in 1941 to guarantee war industry job opportunities for African Americans, but failed temporarily in his goal to see the military become racially integrated.
SPORTS
January 13, 2009 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daniel Stewart isn't ready to commit to a college program just yet. But if the Neumann-Goretti basketball standout was, one program in Texas would be very happy. "I really don't have schools in order, but I'm liking the University of Houston," said Stewart, a 6-foot-6 junior forward. Assistant coach Melvin Haralson "shows me a lot of love. " Though leaning toward the Cougars, Stewart said he wouldn't make a decision until the summer. A high-flying dunker, Stewart averaged 11.1 points per game through Sunday for the Saints, The Inquirer's fifth-ranked team in Southeastern Pennsylvania.
SPORTS
November 29, 2008 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archbishop Wood built a 23-0 halftime lead with the aid of a big defensive stop en route to a 37-7 win over Bayard Rustin last night in the quarterfinals of the PIAA Class AAA playoffs at Plymouth Whitemarsh. The victory put the Vikings in a semifinal matchup next weekend with Selinsgrove at a site and time to be determined. The Vikings raised their record to 11-2 with the win. Rustin fell to 12-2. The loss ended an 11-game winning streak for the Golden Knights. Senior Sean Cunningham scored four touchdowns for the Vikings, the longest one coming from 69 yards out. Another came on a 20-yard pass from quarterback Sean McCartney.
SPORTS
October 23, 2008
With just two weeks remaining in the regular season for PIAA District 1 football teams, it's time to take a look at the playoff picture. Who is definitely in. Who is probably in. Who could wind up on the outside looking in. Here's how we see it shaking out, with current records, power-points average, and our prediction of each team's final record in parentheses. Class AAAA The 16 teams with the highest points average will qualify. Definitely in: North Penn (8-0 record, 141 power-points average, 10-0 predicted finish)
SPORTS
October 17, 2008 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the summer, Anthony Verderame worked on a construction site for an Exton-based company that specializes in designing and building technical-related facilities. The blue-collar job was a good fit for Verderame, who is familiar with building things from the ground up. That's what he and his teammates have been doing since Bayard Rustin started a varsity football program three years ago. Verderame, a senior tight end and outside linebacker, and company have made major progress on their project of establishing a winning and respected team.
SPORTS
June 4, 2008 | By JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO For the Daily News
This wasn't supposed to happen. The Radnor girls' lacrosse team had rolled over opponents during the playoffs, winning by an average of 13 goals a game. They had chalked up 22 straight victories, so winning the PIAA District 1 Class AAA title was going to be easy, right? But to have Bayard Rustin run through them, by them, and, in some instances, over them was something new. The Red Raiders - undefeated and nationally ranked - weren't expecting to get bum-rushed. They were never punched in the face before.
SPORTS
June 4, 2008 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Radnor coach Phyllis Kilgour had a few things to say to her girls' lacrosse team at halftime last night. Whatever she said, it worked. Outscoring Bayard Rustin by 9-3 after intermission, Radnor went on to earn a 15-11 victory for the District 1 Class AAA championship. The triumph at Marple-Newtown's Harry R. Harvey Field marked the Red Raiders' first district title. It also marked the first time that Radnor (23-0) finished the season with an unblemished record. The Golden Knights (17-3)
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Running back Steve Hess was a marked man while carrying the football for Bayard Rustin the last two football seasons. But the 5-foot-8, 175-pounder knows that on Thursday night, many of the people who were gunning for him will be on his side now. Hess' South team will try to halt a two-game losing streak against the North in Chester County's 10th annual Valor Bowl at Downingtown West. No matter which squad wins, the players know the big winners will be the youngsters and adults who participate in Special Olympics of Chester County.
SPORTS
April 6, 2008 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Father Judge boys' and Swenson girls' track and field teams shined the brightest in what was a record-setting meet. The Crusaders shattered four meet records yesterday at the Colonial Relays. Swenson was just as impressive, breaking three. But they weren't the only record-setters, as 16 meet records fell at the meet held at Plymouth Whitemarsh High School. "We came in here and pretty much took the meet by storm, I guess," Judge senior Pat Ayling said. The Crusaders' domination began in the first track event of the day. That's when Leemue Koimene, Dan Dunkelberger and twin brothers Jermaine and Jerome Lowry won the shuttle hurdles in a record-setting time of 1 minute, 3.39 seconds.
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