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NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - Few seem to be enjoying the management meltdown at the venerable BBC more than Rupert Murdoch, the News Corp. chief whose rival British newspapers have been caught up in their own lengthy, embarrassing, and expensive phone-hacking scandal. But the troubles for both media organizations highlight the fact that the news industry in Britain is at rock bottom in public esteem, and could face increased restrictions from the government of Prime Minister David Cameron, which appears convinced that the industry has been unable to police itself.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - Opponents of the late Margaret Thatcher are taking a kind of musical revenge on the former prime minister, pushing the song "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead" up the British charts in a posthumous protest over her polarizing policies. By Friday the online campaign had propelled the Wizard of Oz song to No. 1 on British iTunes and into the top five of the music chart used by the BBC to compile its weekly radio countdown. The unusual campaign has caused a headache for the BBC. With the ditty near the top of the charts, the broadcaster faced the prospect of airing the words "The Wicked Witch is Dead!"
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
Given the awe with which our National Public Radio regards the British Broadcasting Corp., it's not likely that this story will be one of the things considered on NPR's nightly menu of "All Things Considered. " The stately image of the BBC has been sullied by revelations of how that government-owned media giant suppressed news about the campaign of Nazi Germany to exterminate European Jews in World War II. In a documentary aired last night by Britain's privately operated Radio 4, the BBC's unwillingness to acknowledge the ongoing Holocaust was attributed to anti-Semitism at the management level and "in the higher ranks of the Foreign Office" - the British equivalent of the U.S. State Department.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | By Jane Eisner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just after 8 o'clock last Saturday morning, investigating police from Scotland Yard's Special Branch showed up at the Glasgow offices of the British Broadcasting Corp. They sifted through files and films, rousing BBC journalists from their beds to help. They left 30 hours later with three vans filled with documents and videos relating to a controversial television series that has never been aired. Here, in the land of Parliament and the Magna Carta, the image of a day- and night-long police raid on the offices of a respected broadcasting company has sent shivers up the spines of libertarians and political shock waves through Westminster, culminating in an intense emergency debate yesterday during which the government was accused of orchestrating the entire mess.
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tim Megaw, 46, has been promoted to senior vice president of television at a company he calls "a hybrid of TV and merchandising": the home-shopping giant QVC Inc., which has its world headquarters in West Goshen. A native of Canada who lives in Westtown, Megaw started his career as a tobacco buyer. He said he continued to draw on that experience at QVC, where predicting consumers' tastes and behavior is vital. Before joining QVC, Megaw worked for the BBC in England. Among his projects, he directed episodes of the soap opera EastEnders during its first two years, and served as director and producer of the Good Morning program.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, the Washington Post, the New York Times and USA Today
There's serious concern in England that Big Ben's chimes, the traditional lead-in to Queen Elizabeth's annual Christmas Day message, won't make it on the BBC this year. "It just sounds wrong," said network exec Simon Schute, citing the new steel hammer that replaced the Victorian one in August. "I'm no expert on bells, but this one has a sort of curious start, and finishes sounding sort of small and clattery. It certainly doesn't sound rich and important anymore. " A tape, maybe? "We shall use the real thing or nothing at all," said his colleague John Breach, who's holding out for the real thing.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON - A sexual abuse scandal shaking the BBC broadened Tuesday, with the broadcaster saying that it is investigating claims of sexual abuse and harassment against nine staff members and contributors, in addition to the late disgraced children's TV host Jimmy Savile. The BBC has been rocked by allegations that Savile, who died last year, abused underage teens over several decades, sometimes on BBC premises. Some of the alleged victims have accused other entertainers and BBC staff of participating in abuse during the 1960s, '70s and '80s.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge in Philadelphia yesterday refused to block television reruns of the British documentary "Mafia Wars" despite protests by a former U.S. drug agent who says the show may get him killed. U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop III declined to issue a preliminary injunction that would have barred the British Broadcasting Corp. from selling the show to television stations. Concerned for the former agent's safety, the judge expressed hopes the news media would not disclose the man's name, but he left the court record of the case unimpounded, making it part of the public record.
NEWS
April 13, 2013 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - Opponents of the late Margaret Thatcher are taking a kind of musical revenge on the former prime minister, pushing the song "Ding Dong! The Witch is Dead" up the British charts in a posthumous protest over her polarizing policies. By Friday the online campaign had propelled the Wizard of Oz song to No. 1 on British iTunes and into the top five of the music chart used by the BBC to compile its weekly radio countdown. The unusual campaign has caused a headache for the BBC. With the ditty near the top of the charts, the broadcaster faced the prospect of airing the words "The Wicked Witch is Dead!"
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A half-century ago, pop music's most popular, most important band had its first of seven straight anni mirabiles . In 1963, the Beatles became an international sensation. A very good year it was. (In a much-discussed June article in the Atlantic, Colin Fleming declared 1963 the quintessential Beatles year.) They released two albums, Please Please Me in March, Meet the Beatles in the fall. In their groundbreaking hit, "Please Please Me," they discovered what they could do in a studio; it got to No. 1 in England.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 10, 2016
Hip Hop Family Tree #3, 1983-1984 by Ed Piskor. Pittsburgh cartoonist Piskor continues his authoritative and highly entertaining graphic history of hip-hop, with tales of the early days of Run-DMC, the Beastie Boys, and the Fat Boys. Fantagraphics, $27.99. Metz/Bully. Bang-up double bill featuring Canadian noise rock trio Metz, with Bully, the Tennessee rock quartet fronted by Alicia Bognanno, who put her own stamp on '90s alt-rock on the band's 2015 debut, Feels Like. Tuesday at First Unitarian Church.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
BBC America's wondrous mini-series Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell , a costume drama with spells, monsters, and cutting-edge special effects, has been dubbed by some critics Harry Potter for the adult set. Others liken it to Doctor Who as told by Jane Austen. A seven-part period drama set in the first decade of the 19th century, it's all that and so much more. Premiering at 10 p.m. Saturday, Strange is based on Susanna Clarke's best-selling 2004 debut novel, which tells an alternative history of England.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if you discovered that you were the property of a multinational corporation? That it held exclusive rights to the very essense of your being - your unique genetic code? What if you found out, you weren't born but man-made? That you are one of nine identical people constructed in a lab? That's one of the terrifying truths Sarah Manning (Tatiana Maslany) has to face in BBC America's Orphan Black , a superb, exciting and intelligent sci-fi thriller which returns for its third season 9 p.m. Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The supernatural TV series, so long stuck in the familiar territory of ghosts, goblins, and vampires, took a strange and interesting turn last year with several fascinating dramas, including The Leftovers on HBO, ABC's Resurrection , The Returned on Sundance, and, last but not least, the chilling procedural Intruders on BBC America. Each told the story of people who traversed the line between life and death - transgressing both categories. They challenged long-held theological views and our usual way of depicting ghosts as ethereal higher beings.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
WHEN Michael Grant a/k/a "Philly Jesus" was arrested on Friday , the story blew up nationally. Now it appears he's going international. Grant's attorney, Charles Gibbs , confirmed to me that Grant was followed around by a BBC News crew, for BBC Trending, in LOVE Park yesterday, meaning that Britain and beyond will get a taste of Philly Jesus. The BBC was "examining his prolific social-media presence and his ridiculous arrest and prosecution for standing in the park as Philly Jesus," Gibbs said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's like toy soldiers. Like cowboys and Indians. Spy vs. spy. It's just a game. So insists Joe Lambe (Tom Hughes) about his job as a British spy. Beautiful, suave, and thoroughly tortured, Joe is the hero of The Game , a taut, superbly plotted six-part espionage drama set in England in 1972, during the height of the Cold War. It premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday on BBC America. A game, perhaps, but as Joe knows firsthand, it's one that routinely leads to heartache, pain, and death.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are very few places left on the tube that offer well-made, old-fashioned swashbuckling fare fit for adults and tweens alike. It's a role BBC America has played well for some time with richly produced, wonderfully acted series such as Sinbad , Atlantis , and now, The Musketeers . Premiering at 9 p.m. Sunday with a 10-episode first season, The Musketeers is a lush, rousing iteration of the classic Alexandre Dumas story featuring...
NEWS
May 1, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DONALD KAWASH lost his job as a teaching assistant at Temple University in 1972 after 1960s-inspired student protests disrupted his American history course. What to do? Out of work and needing an income, Don turned to playing piano in local bars and parties. His specialty was ragtime, particularly the songs of Scott Joplin, the African-American composer and piano player of the early 20th century. Although he was far from giving up teaching, Don was launched on a parallel career as one of the nation's top ragtime virtuosos, whose playing progressed from local night spots to the Smithsonian, the Kimmel Center, Scotland and more than 200 classic American music shows up and down the East Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who is the Doctor, that singular TV character whose show, Doctor Who , has invited that question again and again for half a century? He's a madman in a blue box. A powerful, time-traveling alien from the planet Gallifrey with superhuman intelligence, he's been to the furthest corners of the universe, from creation to the moment of annihilation. He's old, more than 900 years, and instead of dying, he regenerates into a new and different version of himself, allowing a slew of actors to play him over the years.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A half-century ago, pop music's most popular, most important band had its first of seven straight anni mirabiles . In 1963, the Beatles became an international sensation. A very good year it was. (In a much-discussed June article in the Atlantic, Colin Fleming declared 1963 the quintessential Beatles year.) They released two albums, Please Please Me in March, Meet the Beatles in the fall. In their groundbreaking hit, "Please Please Me," they discovered what they could do in a studio; it got to No. 1 in England.
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