FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
A civil rights activist with a reputation as one of the most visible spokesmen against apartheid will speak at the Burlington County College main campus on Wednesday at 11:15 a.m. Human rights activist Randall Robinson will speak to students, teachers and the public at the college's theater at the Pemberton Campus on Pemberton- Browns Mills Road (Route 530). The free lecture is being sponsored by the college's Minority Student Union. Tickets must be acquired in advance. After Robinson speaks, he will be questioned by a panel of students about apartheid in South Africa and southwest African countries such as Nambia.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
A tentative contract agreement between Burlington County College and faculty members was approved last week by the college's 95 professors. "The mood of the faculty was that they saw this - considering the economic times - to be an acceptable settlement in terms of money and the improvement of some working conditions," said faculty union president Karen Woodward, who added that the proposed contract was given overwhelming approval. Under the terms of the negotiations, both sides agreed not to disclose details of any agreement until it had been finalized.
SPORTS
October 29, 2000 | By Rich Fisher, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mickey Seiler sifted through the rubble of the Burlington County College men's soccer team last year and wasted little time rebuilding the program into the solid structure it once was. After a one-year absence, the seventh-seeded Barons have returned to the Region 19 playoffs and will visit second-seeded Raritan Valley on Tuesday in a first-round game. Before last season, BCC had reached the region playoffs five straight years and finished second in the National Junior College Athletic Association national tournament in 1996.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | By William D. Smith, Special to The Inquirer
Burlington County College and Hahnemann Universty of Philadelphia have agreed to allow BCC's nursing students to transfer into a nursing program at Hahnemann that is designed specifically for BCC students. The plan, which will begin in May, is an effort by Hahnemann University officials to recruit BCC nursing students, said BCC spokesman Richard Pokrass. The transfer agreement was signed in November, Pokrass said. Students who earn two-year associate's degrees in nursing at BCC, a program requiring 70 credits, are eligible to transfer into the two-year nursing program at Hahnemann that is designed for BCC students who want to work toward bachelor's degrees, said Pokrass.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | By William D. Smith, Special to The Inquirer
Burlington County College's board of trustees has voted unanimously to accept $323,920 in grants from the New Jersey Department of Higher Education to improve the college's facilities. The learning disabilities program, which consists of workshops to help teachers recognize a student with learning disabilities, received $12,028 Nov. 21. The "Success Seminars for Academically High Risk Education Students" program received $43,047 for seminars for students who are on academic probation.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT LAUREL Rutgers-Camden will bring its undergraduate business administration degree to Burlington County College's Mount Laurel campus this fall, the schools announced Tuesday evening. BCC will be the fourth community college to host the bachelor of arts in business administration program, which began in 2011 at Atlantic Cape Community College and Brookdale Community College in Monmouth County. This fall, BCC and Camden County College will offer the program for the first time. The undergraduate degree is designed to be hosted out of other campuses and is not offered on Rutgers' campus in Camden.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By William D. Smith, Special to The Inquirer
Delran resident Janis Kerrigan on Tuesday night will be seated for a one- year term as an alumni trustee on the Burlington County College Board of Trustees at the Pemberton Campus. Alumni trustees are nominated each September. Elections are held in December, and the trustees usually are seated in January. Kerrigan, who is an English and journalism major at Trenton State College, said that college officials were hesitant about seating her on the board because she is registered in a liberal arts course at BCC, although she graduated in June.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
The nursing program at Burlington County College received accreditation the first time it was eligible, according to Richard J. Pokrass, spokesman for the college. The National League for Nursing Board of Review approved the program in June. The accreditation is good until 1994. The college's nursing program was started in 1983 in response to increased demand for nursing classes, Pokrass said. Pokrass said the nursing program has been an immediate success with both area hospitals and students.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
Burlington County College president Robert Messina, in the midst of developing a 15-year master plan, is touting a proposal to build a high- technology campus in Mount Laurel as the keystone to secure a role for the college in the next century. Although 4,000 students enroll each year at the 225-acre main campus in Pemberton Township, Messina said, the site is almost fully developed and will never be able to accommodate students seeking technical training. He said $11 million in state money had already been reserved for the project, which is scheduled for construction on 74 acres of farmland and orchards between Route 38 and the Marne Highway near Interstate 295. The land was purchased for $4.5 million in December 1988 by the Burlington County freeholders.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
With its engineering department expanding, the nursing school newly accredited and growing, and the cooperative-education program thriving, Burlington County College is getting a reputation as a good place to study if you want to prepare yourself for a good job. But several BCC educators have launched a program designed to be practical on another plane. The program, called LIFT - for Liberal Interdisciplinary Foundations for Transfer - would give students "a crash, one-year plunge into liberal arts," said Fran Conroy, a BCC professor who helped organize it. The idea, said Conroy, "is to help the person find man's place in the universe, through all the disciplines . . . literature, philosophy, history.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A young woman filming a college marketing commercial last week looked into the camera and repeated her line: "Rowan College at Burlington County: Your path to success. " It won't be only the students picking a new "path to success. " The school, facing declining state funding and a shrinking pool of high school graduates, has rebranded itself and is reconfiguring its campuses to remain a viable option for students in an increasingly competitive environment. Founded in 1969 as Burlington County College and starting with a campus in Pemberton, the school has grown to more than 9,000 students in Pemberton, Mount Laurel, Willingboro, Mount Holly, and the joint military base.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at Burlington County College will soon find themselves at a new school: Rowan College at Burlington County. As part of a new partnership with Rowan University, BCC will change its name to Rowan College at Burlington County, the schools announced Wednesday. This marks the second such partnership Rowan has made with a community college, following one that saw Gloucester County College change its name to Rowan College at Gloucester County last year. The schools will make a formal announcement Thursday; their respective trustee boards authorized the partnership agreement Wednesday.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington County College didn't have to look far for its next president. A year after Gov. Christie plucked its previous president out of the state's largest county to become New Jersey education commissioner, the college named Paul Drayton Jr., the Burlington County administrator and former CEO of the Delaware River Port Authority, as its new leader. "He was quickly moved through the process, mainly for his Burlington County roots and Burlington experience and knowledge of Burlington County," George N. Nyikita, the chair of the school's board of trustees, said Wednesday.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a whir reminiscent of science-fiction movies, 15 minutes, and a well-designed model in the computer, Burlington County College's newest piece of equipment created a small, plastic machine part Wednesday morning. The school's new 3-D printer, donated by a local defense contractor, will be at the center of a workforce development program the college hopes will train students in the three-dimensional scanning and printing technologies that have gained popularity in recent years.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. Laufer, 79, of Vincentown, a former Burlington County College administrator who had been the county historian since 2003, died of cancer Saturday, July 19, at his home. The Volunteer Center of Burlington County gave him its Lloyd Ritter Community Service Award in 2007, and the United Way of Burlington County also gave him its community service award. Mike Pippin, coordinator for the Volunteer Center, said Mr. Laufer was honored not only for his work for the county, but "for the many things he had done throughout his life.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT LAUREL Rutgers-Camden will bring its undergraduate business administration degree to Burlington County College's Mount Laurel campus this fall, the schools announced Tuesday evening. BCC will be the fourth community college to host the bachelor of arts in business administration program, which began in 2011 at Atlantic Cape Community College and Brookdale Community College in Monmouth County. This fall, BCC and Camden County College will offer the program for the first time. The undergraduate degree is designed to be hosted out of other campuses and is not offered on Rutgers' campus in Camden.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai and Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Christie on Thursday named Burlington County College president David Hespe to replace Christopher Cerf as state education commissioner. Hespe's resignation from BCC is effective March 20, the school said. He will take over as acting commissioner that day. Cerf announced his resignation from the top K-12 education post this month. He will serve until a state board meeting Wednesday. An interim commissioner is expected to fill the spot until Hespe begins work, the Department of Education said.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
MOUNT HOLLY There are plenty of ways to honor Black History Month, but Sunday at Burlington County College was definitely one of the tastiest. Top chefs and South Jersey natives Kevin Sbraga, a Philadelphia restaurateur, and Tim Witcher, a former executive chef who is now a culinary arts teacher, teamed up at the college's Culinary Arts Center in Mount Holly to give cooking demonstrations. Called "A Taste of Soul," it was part of the college's monthlong celebration recognizing the contributions of African Americans.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When David Hespe took the reins of Burlington County College in September, his predecessor had just departed after 25 years. The newcomer expected a challenging year of transition. What he did not expect was Hurricane Sandy, the storm that walloped New Jersey in October and forced the campus to become one of two authorized shelters in the county. "We were more than happy to help out," Hespe said last week in a wide-ranging interview looking back on his first year, "but it was a tough two weeks.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Underground Railroad Education Center was forced to close in Burlington City in December, founder and director Louise Calloway wasn't sure about its future. For seven years, she ran the center in a 19th century building adjacent to a pharmacy believed to have been an Underground Railroad stop. But Calloway could no longer afford the rent and had to move the artifacts, paintings, statuary, and books into storage at her Willingboro home. Then, last month, she got a call from Burlington County Administrator Paul Drayton Jr., who learned of the center's closing and wanted to find it a new home.
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