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NEWS
August 4, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / DAN Z. JOHNSON
April Keefer raises a hand to welcome the Beach Boys to Wildwood. About 15,000 people turned out yesterday for the band's first East Coast beach concert since 1983, when then-Interior Secretary James Watt kept the group from July Fourth festivities in D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1987 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the one hand, we have the Beach Boys with their chug-a-chug-a rhythms and high harmonies, feeling those "Good Vibrations," singing the praises of golden-skinned "California Girls" and knowing that "Surfin' " is more a state of mind than actually riding the Big Wave. And then there is Julio Iglesias, the smooth, tuxedoed romantic, singing his love songs in an assortment of languages, including, of course, that of his native Spain. Surely, there are good vibrations here, too, but mostly they are evident only in the eyes of adoring fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
It's almost like those good old days that classic rock radio is trying so hard to make sure we remember: This week, Chicago and the Beach Boys perform at the Spectrum. Try to contain that enthusiastic outburst, and forget about the nostalgia angle: While both bands will dig deep into their reserves of old hits, both are experiencing success right now - the Beach Boys with "Kokomo" from the Cocktail soundtrack, and Chicago with the power ballad "Look Away. " How the mighty have fallen.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | By Michael L. Rozansky, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Help them, Rhonda. The Beach Boys have been rocked by bad vibrations since hearing that ABC began production last month on a TV movie about the '60s singing group. "It's not authorized, and we're not being paid," said the group's manager, Tom Hulett. "We don't want to help them get any publicity, and we are refusing to license (to them) any of the music we can control. " Executive producer Len Hill is in charge of adapting Steven Gains' 1984 nonfiction book, Heroes & Villains: The True Story of the Beach Boys.
NEWS
January 5, 1988 | By Michael Capuzzo, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, People magazine, USA Today and the New York Times
What musical group is in the same class as Bing Crosby, Berry Gordy, Irving Berlin, Johnny Cash, Ella Fitzgerald, Perry Como, Benny Goodman, Chuck Berry, Stevie Wonder, Kenny Rogers, Michael Jackson, Loretta Lynn, Paul McCartney and Elvis Presley? It's the Beach Boys, picked yesterday as the first group to win the American Music Awards' Award of Merit in the 15-year history of the prize. Singer David Lee Roth will present the honorary award during a live telecast of the American Music Awards from Los Angeles Jan. 25. ARRESTS AT CONCERT Police in Buenos Aires announced yesterday that they had arrested 130 people at a Sunday night Tina Turner concert, most for intoxication or for trying to steal stereo equipment from cars parked around the soccer stadium where Turner performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2006 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
Jim Noir writes bouncy ditties about the random stuff of everyday life: broken computers, childhood tree-climbing, the key of C. But this 24-year-old from Manchester, England, turns them into low-key celebrations when he layers them with vocal harmonies. They become compact homages to the Beach Boys. "I grew up with the Beatles, mainly. I never really got into the Beach Boys until quite late on," Noir says on the phone from Vancouver. "All I'd ever heard was the old, early surf stuff, and I wasn't really too into all that.
NEWS
June 18, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania and FOR THE INQUIRER
If the Dallas Cowboys are America's team, then the Beach Boys — who are marking 50 years of fun, fun, fun with a new album and a tour that brought them to the Susquehanna Bank Center in Camden on Saturday — are America's band. Granted, they have been more or less a movable oldies jukebox for the last 30 years, at least, but that does not diminish the deathlessness of their songbook or erase the fact that they have provided the aspirational soundtrack for American life, the grand illusion of an eternal summer of sun, surf, hot rods, bikinis, and burger joints.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | By Marc Schogol, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next summer, the needy, abused and neglected children Sister Kathleen Reilly helps care for at St. Vincent's home will be going to the beach, thanks to the Beach Boys. Next weekend, David Heaton will have a whole new crew of volunteers at 18th Street Development Corp. to help him repair run-down homes in South Philadelphia. As soon as they can be instructed and organized, Philabundance's Pamela Rainey Lawler will have more than three dozen new recruits to help her pick up surplus food and deliver it to the hungry.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just how long have the Beach Boys been around? So long that there's now a second generation of Beach Boys. The newest member of the group that's made a career out of preaching the gospel of Endless Summers is Matthew Jardine, the 27-year-old son of Al Jardine. The elder Jardine was among the founding members of the Beach Boys, along with Mike Love and the Wilson brothers, Brian, Carl and Dennis. They made their first major - pardon the expression - splash in 1961 when Brian wrote and produced a number called "Surfin'.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The Beach Boys epitomized everything that was squeaky-clean, youthful and refreshing about the post-war culture of Southern California. You know, that 1960s era of hot rods and surfin' safaris, of "fun-fun-fun" and "two girls for every boy. " 'Twas an idyllic lifestyle they'd celebrate worldwide with richly harmonic vocalizing and twangy boss guitar, with frisky refrains sharing the uplift and repetitiveness of a football cheerleading anthem....
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NEWS
March 13, 2016
More Rain (Merge ***) In his capacity as Zooey Deschanel's helpmate in She & Him, Matt Ward is responsible for more than his share of musical sunshine. Fair enough, then, that on his eighth solo album the guitarist and producer - who oversaw gospel great Mavis Staples' new Living on a High Note - tends toward the gray and drizzly. More Rain is a musical mood piece that throws an overcast spell on a set of 11 originals and one cover - of the Beach Boys' normally sunny "You're So Good to Me" - that demonstrates Ward's way with vintage rock, folk, and R&B atmospherics.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | Dan DeLuca, Staff Music Critic
It was from the Psychedelic Swamp that Dr. Dog first emerged, and to the Psychedelic Swamp they have now returned. That is, at the turn of the millennium, when Scott McMicken and Toby Leaman of Philadelphia indie band Dr. Dog were students at West Chester University, they recorded a low-fi concept album called The Psychedelic Swamp that was never intended for release. But a decade and a half later, that project - about a man named Phrases who attempts to escape his humdrum daily existence by making an ill-fated getaway to a place called the Psychedelic Swamp - became the focus of a 2015 Philadelphia Fringe Festival production called Swamp Is On that was a collaboration between Dr. Dog and the Pig Iron Theatre Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Jordan Smith, of course Was there ever any doubt Jordan Smith would take home the crown on NBC's The Voice this season? The 22-year-old Kentuckian, who learned the ropes singing at his Harlan County church, was declared the winner Tuesday night on the second of a two-episode season finale. Smith, who was coached by Adam Levine , on Monday scored the Nos. 1 and 3 hits on iTunes with a rousing - some would say bombastic - performance of The Sound of Music 's "Climb Ev'ry Mountain" and a soulful rendition of "Mary, Did You Know?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - It all feels so easy, looks so casual. But it sounds unlike anything. Roomful of Teeth, the vocal octet whose somewhat regular presence here Philadelphians should envy, seemed to be just dropping in at the McCarter Theatre Center for an 80-minute-or-so Sunday program that may have radically changed forever the way some listeners hear voices in concert. Far more inviting than alienating (as innovation can be on first encounter), this group founded by Brad Wells uses amplification - each singer has a microphone - to create intimacy with the audience, sometimes as though the voices are whispering in your ear. In a darkened auditorium with singers in everyday street clothes, there's almost a campfire effect.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The Zombies have long been known for opulent melodies, unpredictable key changes, and a smart, soulful sound embracing jazz, R&B, blues, psychedelia, and classical nuances, from their smash singles (1964's "She's Not There," 1965's "Tell Her No," and 1969's "Time of the Season") to their chamber-pop, hippie-hymnal epic, 1968's Odessey and Oracle , an album that led to the band's breakup. At the heart of all this were Colin Blunstone's breathy vocals and principal composer Rod Argent's organ and piano.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
In November 1985, sibling sons of Glasgow Jim and William Reid - then the centerpieces of the metronomic Jesus and Mary Chain - released their first and best album, Psychocandy . It's an album that remains definitive and influential for its meeting of early Beach Boys-like melodies and slowed-down Velvet Undergroundish noise. With shadowy guitar feedback as fuzzy as their hair, the sunglass-wearing brothers' seminal surging sound and dry, minimalistic rhythm was a sonic primal scream topped by lip-licking romanticized lyrics that were alternately syrup-sweet (literally, as in "Just Like Honey" and sinister, "In a Hole")
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saturday CAPE MAY At 8 p.m., the Philadelphia Boys Choir & Chorale performs a full-length concert at the Cape May Convention Hall (714 Beach Ave.). The Emmy award-winning, Grammy-nominated ensemble is composed of 80 young choir members and a 20-person men's chorale. $20 ($15 for seniors; $10 for kids 12 and older). 609-884-9565. Sunday WILDWOOD Through Friday, get a taste of the Shore at Wildwoods Restaurant Week. Select eateries ranging from Schellenger's Restaurant to Westy's Irish Pub will offer a four-course meal for $30. For a list of participants, see wildwoodsnj.com/wildwoods-restaurant-week.cfm, or call 609-729-9000.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Dan McQuade, For The Inquirer
Bob Rose said he had tried but figured there was no shot. He and a partner book shows each summer on the Ocean City Music Pier. Before each season, he talks with city officials and residents about which acts they'd like to see. This year, someone suggested the Beach Boys. "I'm thinking, 'Yeah, right,' " Rose said. "So I talked to my partner, and he decided to pursue it, and, lo and behold, [the Beach Boys] liked the idea of playing in Ocean City. When you're pitching 'America's Greatest Family Resort,' you can't think of a better band than the Beach Boys.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2015 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
From the start, Best Coast's Bethany Cosentino and Bobb Bruno have used their record collection as a source of inspiration, gleefully embracing the past with little anxiety of influence. The duo formed in Los Angeles in 2009 as a vehicle for Cosentino's yearning, soaring songs and love of girl-group pop, surf rock, and pop-punk. Crazy For You , their debut album, arrived in 2010. "The first record, there was a lot of influence from the '60s," says Cosentino, on the phone from Portland, Ore., early in a tour that comes Sunday to Union Transfer.
NEWS
June 8, 2015
COMING THIS WEEK Aloft "How can a mother abandon her son?" Not easily, as Jennifer Connelly, Cillian Murphy, and Mélanie Laurent find out in this wintry drama of estrangement and reconciliation from Oscar-nominated director Claudia Llosa ( The Milk of Sorrow ). R Jurassic World A new breed of genetically engineered dinosaur causes trouble at the Isla Nublar theme park in this third sequel based on Steven Spielberg's 1993 runaway megahit. Spielberg executive-produced this one; Colin Trevorrow of the tiny Aubrey Plaza time-travel indie Safety Not Guaranteed directs.
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