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Bean Sprouts

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FOOD
March 1, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
The broth of this clean-tasting, light dinner soup is brightened by an infusion of fresh ginger and dashes of fish sauce and sesame oil.   Poached Shrimp in Ginger Broth Makers 2 or 3 servings 1 pound raw, shell-on jumbo shrimp 1 small red chile pepper 2 scallions 1 small clove garlic 1 1/2-inch piece gingerroot 2 cups loosely packed fresh mung bean sprouts 1/3 cup packed cilantro leaves...
FOOD
August 19, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Right now, Thai food is - no pun intended - hot. And no wonder. It showcases healthful ingredients through vivid colors and assertive flavors while tackling our basic senses of hot, sweet, sour, salt and bitter at a single meal. Thailand the Beautiful Cookbook (Collins Publishers, $45) does an excellent job of capturing the essence of this multifaceted cuisine. This is the latest volume in the award-winning Beautiful Cookbook series. Though a bit pricey, it's one of those oversize books whose color photographs are almost worth the price of admission.
FOOD
August 31, 2012
The steaming-hot pork-bone broth that serves as the base of Nom Nom Ramen's tonkotsu-style soups might not sound appealing in the midst of 90-plus temperatures, but its cold cousin provides all the flavor and none of the perspiration. Hiyashi chuka - literally "chilled Chinese noodles," as Japan adopted ramen from the People's Republic - features Nom Nom's custom-made noodles flash-chilled and scattered over a savory dressing of soy, vinegar, sesame oil, and katsuobushi, the fermented tuna flakes used to make dashi.
NEWS
August 23, 1991 | by Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
It was daring: taking my 13-year-old godson to Hong's Chinese Restaurant off South Street when his restaurant experience was minimal and the last time he came to visit he would eat only canned Spaghetti-O's and sandwiches on white bread. He still insists on white bread, but was willing and eager on a recent visit to order off a restaurant menu listing foods he had never heard of before. Hong's is not your typical Chinese restaurant. It does not offer chicken fingers on pu-pu platters.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With all the many Chinese restaurants in South Jersey, some of which seem to change owners with the season, it is increasingly difficult to know the exceptional from the routine. One of the good, reliable places is King's Palace, a brightly lighted restaurant that has been a fixture in the Greentree Square Shopping Center in Evesham Township the last four years. Judging by the number of patrons greeted with familiarity by the staff, King's Palace has a steady clientele of repeat customers.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the hustle-bustle of busy Baltimore Avenue, Touch of Siam restaurant offers quiet, elegant sanctuary with splendid food, gracious service and civilized surroundings. The gorgeous Thai restaurant in East Lansdowne has only 14 tables, each prettily set with pink napkins and tablecloths, fresh purple orchids in beautiful Thai ceramic flower vases, a candle in cut-glass holder, delicate pink-and-gray dishes and graceful black lacquered chairs with mauve seats. Walls with classy cream-colored wallpaper are decorated with Thai fans painted with colorful country scenes and small aqua parasols painted with flowers; recessed windows are filled with potted plants, and dinner music plays quietly in the background.
NEWS
October 2, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its elegant, contemporary decor, Spring Garden typifies the new Chinese restaurants that continue to sprout in South Jersey. Opened several months ago by Michael Chang on Route 70 in Cherry Hill, the decor and cuisine are remarkably similar to his former restaurant in Maple Shade. The attractive gray and rose color scheme is a far cry from the traditional red-flocked decor that used to signify Chinese restaurants. Gray wallpaper imprinted with white Asian flowers and leaves complements rose-covered booths and gorgeous sprays of colorful silk roses, mums, daffodils and iris.
FOOD
October 8, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I recently grabbed a late-night dinner at The Continental at 2nd and Market streets. I fell in love with the Rad Na Thai Chicken. Any chance of prying the recipe out of the chef? Tammy Dotts, Pottstown Dear Tammy, The Continental Restaurant and Martini Bar is owned by former concert promoter Steven Starr. In 1995, he took over the old Continental Diner, hired a designer from New York's SoHo and the Continental was reborn. Chef de Cuisine Raul Bacordo came to the Continental from New York's China Grill.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although open only six months, the Jade Palace in Jenkintown seems to be one of our most popular suburban restaurants. It is filled with happy diners even on normally quiet summer weeknights. The reason is obvious: The Chinese and Vietnamese dishes are pleasant - although not sensational - and the surroundings beautiful. The menu primarily offers Chinese cuisine, although there are a handful of Vietnamese dishes. I concentrated on the less-familiar Vietnamese cuisine, although several dishes that looked appealing on the menu were not available.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Joy Tsin Lau, the Chinatown eatery where 100 lawyers and law students were sickened in February, received another scorching helping of criticism last week from the city Health Department. The dim sum restaurant "does not have adequate refrigeration equipment [or the] capacity to maintain all refrigerated foods at a temperature of 41 degrees or below," inspector Thomas Kolb wrote Thursday. Temperatures over 41 degrees promote the rapid growth of potentially toxic bacteria. In his report, Kolb wrote that jellyfish, duck, and bean sprouts were being stored at temperatures of 50 degrees or more at Joy Tsin Lau. The inspector also cited the restaurant for two additional serious risk factors - an employee eating in the kitchen prep area and another who did not follow proper hand-washing protocols - and seven lesser infractions.
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NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Joy Tsin Lau, the Chinatown eatery where 100 lawyers and law students were sickened in February, received another scorching helping of criticism last week from the city Health Department. The dim sum restaurant "does not have adequate refrigeration equipment [or the] capacity to maintain all refrigerated foods at a temperature of 41 degrees or below," inspector Thomas Kolb wrote Thursday. Temperatures over 41 degrees promote the rapid growth of potentially toxic bacteria. In his report, Kolb wrote that jellyfish, duck, and bean sprouts were being stored at temperatures of 50 degrees or more at Joy Tsin Lau. The inspector also cited the restaurant for two additional serious risk factors - an employee eating in the kitchen prep area and another who did not follow proper hand-washing protocols - and seven lesser infractions.
FOOD
March 1, 2013 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
The broth of this clean-tasting, light dinner soup is brightened by an infusion of fresh ginger and dashes of fish sauce and sesame oil.   Poached Shrimp in Ginger Broth Makers 2 or 3 servings 1 pound raw, shell-on jumbo shrimp 1 small red chile pepper 2 scallions 1 small clove garlic 1 1/2-inch piece gingerroot 2 cups loosely packed fresh mung bean sprouts 1/3 cup packed cilantro leaves...
FOOD
August 31, 2012
The steaming-hot pork-bone broth that serves as the base of Nom Nom Ramen's tonkotsu-style soups might not sound appealing in the midst of 90-plus temperatures, but its cold cousin provides all the flavor and none of the perspiration. Hiyashi chuka - literally "chilled Chinese noodles," as Japan adopted ramen from the People's Republic - features Nom Nom's custom-made noodles flash-chilled and scattered over a savory dressing of soy, vinegar, sesame oil, and katsuobushi, the fermented tuna flakes used to make dashi.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2007
Shop carefully for seafood that's been harvested in a responsible manner, then make the most of it by giving it star billing in boldly flavored dishes such as these from Paul Johnson's "Fish Forever" (Wiley, 2007, $34.95). GRILLED LEMONGRASS SHRIMP AND RICE NOODLE SALAD For the marinade: 3 to 4 stalks lemongrass, white part only, peeled 2 garlic cloves, chopped 8 to 10 fresh basil leaves, minced 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil 2 tablespoons fish sauce 2 tablespoons sugar For the nuoc cham dipping sauce: 2 garlic cloves 1 or 2 Thai bird, Fresno or other red chilies, seeded and minced Juice of 2 limes (shells reserved)
NEWS
August 12, 2003 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State police said yesterday they were pursuing multiple leads in the fatal stabbing Thursday of Su-Mei Ko Cho, 65, who co-owned and operated Cho's Bean Sprouts on Forest Manor Road in Upper Oxford Township. Police said they knew that Cho and her husband, Chen-De Cho, 67, who also owns the business, had a contentious relationship punctuated by protection-from-abuse orders dating to 1999. However, police said, Chen-De Cho is not a suspect, citing his recent health problems and the crime's violent nature.
FOOD
January 30, 2003 | By Maria Gallagher FOR THE INQUIRER
Exit the Year of the Horse and enter the Year of the Sheep. Chinatown communities in Philadelphia and around the world will greet the Chinese New Year, also known as Lunar New Year, on Saturday with firecrackers and lion dances. It is the year 4700 by the Chinese calendar, which measures time by the movements of the sun, moon and stars. Lunar New Year coincides with the second new moon after the winter solstice. Though the public holiday in China lasts three days, two weeks of celebrating ensue.
NEWS
February 27, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saigon Vietnam Restaurant gives South Jersey a chance to experience the joys of Vietnamese cuisine, an opportunity that should not be missed. Saigon was opened late last summer by An Nguyen and his mother, Huong Pham, next to Flower World on Route 38 in Pennsauken. Sadly, the site seems to be the kiss of death, for at least a dozen fine restaurants - most but not all Chinese - have failed in the last 15 years. But with the quality of Huong Pham's home-cooked dishes, generous portions and astonishingly low prices, there's perhaps a chance Saigon will have better luck than its predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The summer before I began college in 1963, I took a job in the orchestra of a Butlins Holiday camp, one of a chain of blue-collar seaside resorts scattered across England that offered packaged family vacations with highly regimented recreation. The first performer at the opening night show was a comedian named Cheeky Charlie Stiles. Before he literally hit the stage, I turned to the drummer and asked what kind of act we could expect. "Unnatural, son," said the percussion man, puffing on a strange-smelling cigarette and shaking his head at the naivete of youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A quick glance at Bean, that hellraiser in herringbone, and you would guess that he goes to Pee-wee Herman's tailor, studied brathood with Dennis the Menace, and learned his social skills from the Three Stooges. On closer examination - case in point, the feature film Bean - you realize that first impressions make Bean, alter ego of British comic Rowan Atkinson, seem more refined than this 10-year-old pest in a middle-aged body actually is. You've heard of an accident waiting to happen?
FOOD
October 8, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! I recently grabbed a late-night dinner at The Continental at 2nd and Market streets. I fell in love with the Rad Na Thai Chicken. Any chance of prying the recipe out of the chef? Tammy Dotts, Pottstown Dear Tammy, The Continental Restaurant and Martini Bar is owned by former concert promoter Steven Starr. In 1995, he took over the old Continental Diner, hired a designer from New York's SoHo and the Continental was reborn. Chef de Cuisine Raul Bacordo came to the Continental from New York's China Grill.
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