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Beatles Songs

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2005 | By David Hinckley NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
While the not-guilty verdict in the Michael Jackson trial should mercifully close the book on much of its sad and sordid business, a few subplots linger. One is that Jackson's cash-flow problems could force him to consider selling some or all of his 50 percent share in the Sony/ATV song publishing catalog. That might sound like bean-counter news - except that this catalog is home to not only a few familiar items such as "Star Dust" and "Blowin' in the Wind," but also to 251 Beatles songs.
NEWS
February 8, 2004
Books: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn and George Martin (Hamlyn, 2000) The Beatles by Hunter Davis (original 1968; reprint Norton, 1996) Lennon by Ray Coleman (original 1985; reprint HarperCollins, 1992) Beatles Anthology by Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr (Harmony, 1988) Web Sites: Beatles-discography.com. A complete list of all the Beatles recordings, with session notes on who played what. www.beatles-discography.com/ "Notes on . . . " by Alan W. Pollack.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Nickelodeon's made-for-TV boy band, Big Time Rush, stretch their skinny legs, graduating to a movie format with a London setting, an espionage plot, and even a sprinkling of Beatles songs. All served up with their usual goofy mirth. The premise is that James, Carlos, Kendall, and Logan are scheduled to launch their world tour at Hyde Park. (The group's actual summer tour brings them to Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center on Aug. 10.) But before the guys can even order room service, they're being hotly pursued both by the bobbies and by a small army of sinister spies.
NEWS
November 20, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
The latest allegations of child molestation swirling around Michael Jackson accelerate one of the most spectacular declines in music history. These days, Jackson is more recognized for shocking headlines than for the effervescent songs that made him a star more than three decades ago. His success as a brilliant singer and entertainer - the child singer who energized the Jackson 5, the charismatic entertainer who moonwalked his way to 46...
NEWS
July 30, 2001 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
With all the lawyers in this country, you'd think that somebody would have gotten an injunction by now preventing David Pack from singing in public. Or at least compelling full disclosure of his involvement in "A Walk Down Abbey Road: A Tribute to the Beatles Featuring Alan Parsons, Ann Wilson, John Entwistle and Todd Rundgren. " Although absent from the list, the former Ambrosia frontman took center stage Friday night at Washington Township's Center for the Performing Arts (a.k.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2006 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Two years ago, Jay-Z - for all intents and purposes, hip-hop's Sinatra - put the vocal tracks from his Black Album on the Internet and invited friends and foes alike to make something new out of them. As a result, adventurous listeners got to hear something remarkable when DJ Dangermouse dipped Jay-Z's chocolate in the Beatles' White Album peanut butter and produced the Internet-only phenomenon known as the The Grey Album. Apple, the company started by the Fab Four and the corporate entity responsible for administering their legacy, was not amused - but not so much over the flagrant copyright violation, something Apple is known to guard against jealously and litigiously.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1995 | By Rip Rense, FOR THE INQUIRER
Call it The Return of the Beatles. When the group broke up in 1970, it left behind much unfinished business: hundreds of hours of unreleased music and film. Now comes the real conclusion of the Fab Four's saga, beginning in late November with three major events: the release of two new "reunion" Beatles songs, ABC's airing of a Beatles- produced The Beatles Anthology documentary, and The Beatles Anthology, Vol. I, a double CD of unreleased music. Meanwhile, music industry sources confirmed that the three remaining Beatles will reunite to complete at least one more John Lennon home tape given to them by Yoko Ono. The song is reportedly one of the last that Lennon recorded, "Grow Old With Me," released as a home-recorded version on the Lennon-Ono album Milk and Honey in 1983.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Twenty years after the demise of the Beatles, Paul McCartney is playing "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" to an awed stadium crowd. Lights are pulsing with the beat in ways they couldn't have in the late '60s. And an extended guitar duel between McCartney and Robbie McIntosh gives birth to musical ideas that would have been gaudily out of place on the Sgt. Pepper album. On either side of the stage, an elaborate video system is giving people in the not-so-cheap rear seats a chance to follow McCartney's expressions - which range from the oft-photographed look of surprise to the famous impish grin, from a businessman-rocker pose to the look of elation that McCartney uses to acknowledge the ravenous applause.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If you count "In Spite of All the Danger," the first song he recorded with John Lennon and George Harrison - in 1958, as the Quarrymen - Paul McCartney played 26 Beatles songs at the sold-out Wachovia Center on Thursday. Sure, the 63-year-old knight of the British realm sprinkled the set list with grabby tunes from his post-Fab Four career. Taking a seat at the grand piano for a glorious "Maybe I'm Amazed. " Rocking out with his crisply professional, if somewhat hacklike, four-piece band on "Let Me Roll It. " And he offered a four-song soupcon of his focused, impressive new Chaos and Creation in the Backyard, his best album in eons.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1988 | By DAVID HINCKLEY, New York Daily News
"Help me if you can, I'm feelin' down And I do appreciate your bein' round" - John Lennon, "Help!" "The Beatles' popularity is a constant," says Joe McCoy, program director of WCBS-FM radio here. "They, and Elvis, are two musical phenomena we may never see repeated. With the Beatles, the fans may not be as visible - you don't get the trips to Graceland or anything like that - but they're just as much there. "Their music has such mass appeal it's incredible. It won't fade because it will never be outdated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Nickelodeon's made-for-TV boy band, Big Time Rush, stretch their skinny legs, graduating to a movie format with a London setting, an espionage plot, and even a sprinkling of Beatles songs. All served up with their usual goofy mirth. The premise is that James, Carlos, Kendall, and Logan are scheduled to launch their world tour at Hyde Park. (The group's actual summer tour brings them to Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center on Aug. 10.) But before the guys can even order room service, they're being hotly pursued both by the bobbies and by a small army of sinister spies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2006 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Two years ago, Jay-Z - for all intents and purposes, hip-hop's Sinatra - put the vocal tracks from his Black Album on the Internet and invited friends and foes alike to make something new out of them. As a result, adventurous listeners got to hear something remarkable when DJ Dangermouse dipped Jay-Z's chocolate in the Beatles' White Album peanut butter and produced the Internet-only phenomenon known as the The Grey Album. Apple, the company started by the Fab Four and the corporate entity responsible for administering their legacy, was not amused - but not so much over the flagrant copyright violation, something Apple is known to guard against jealously and litigiously.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2005 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
If you count "In Spite of All the Danger," the first song he recorded with John Lennon and George Harrison - in 1958, as the Quarrymen - Paul McCartney played 26 Beatles songs at the sold-out Wachovia Center on Thursday. Sure, the 63-year-old knight of the British realm sprinkled the set list with grabby tunes from his post-Fab Four career. Taking a seat at the grand piano for a glorious "Maybe I'm Amazed. " Rocking out with his crisply professional, if somewhat hacklike, four-piece band on "Let Me Roll It. " And he offered a four-song soupcon of his focused, impressive new Chaos and Creation in the Backyard, his best album in eons.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2005 | By David Hinckley NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
While the not-guilty verdict in the Michael Jackson trial should mercifully close the book on much of its sad and sordid business, a few subplots linger. One is that Jackson's cash-flow problems could force him to consider selling some or all of his 50 percent share in the Sony/ATV song publishing catalog. That might sound like bean-counter news - except that this catalog is home to not only a few familiar items such as "Star Dust" and "Blowin' in the Wind," but also to 251 Beatles songs.
NEWS
February 8, 2004
Books: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn and George Martin (Hamlyn, 2000) The Beatles by Hunter Davis (original 1968; reprint Norton, 1996) Lennon by Ray Coleman (original 1985; reprint HarperCollins, 1992) Beatles Anthology by Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr (Harmony, 1988) Web Sites: Beatles-discography.com. A complete list of all the Beatles recordings, with session notes on who played what. www.beatles-discography.com/ "Notes on . . . " by Alan W. Pollack.
NEWS
November 20, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
The latest allegations of child molestation swirling around Michael Jackson accelerate one of the most spectacular declines in music history. These days, Jackson is more recognized for shocking headlines than for the effervescent songs that made him a star more than three decades ago. His success as a brilliant singer and entertainer - the child singer who energized the Jackson 5, the charismatic entertainer who moonwalked his way to 46...
NEWS
July 30, 2001 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
With all the lawyers in this country, you'd think that somebody would have gotten an injunction by now preventing David Pack from singing in public. Or at least compelling full disclosure of his involvement in "A Walk Down Abbey Road: A Tribute to the Beatles Featuring Alan Parsons, Ann Wilson, John Entwistle and Todd Rundgren. " Although absent from the list, the former Ambrosia frontman took center stage Friday night at Washington Township's Center for the Performing Arts (a.k.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | By Charles Huckabee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The song's the thing this weekend, in new compositions that will be premiered tonight by Network for New Music at Temple University, and as the inspiration for pianist Stewart Goodyear, who will include his Variations on "Eleanor Rigby" in recital Sunday at the Curtis Institute. Network for New Music, as its name implies, regularly commissions new works, and it has collaborated with other art forms before. Brand-new, though, is its Poetry Project, which involved Philadelphia poet Stephen Berg and four local composers: Andrea Clearfield, Kile Smith, Adam Wernick and Margaret Garwood.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, USA Today and People magazine contributed to this report
Yoko Ono has emerged just in time to add some persepctive to the much- hyped, almost-Beatles reunion. "I remember how John always said there could be no reunion of the Beatles because, if they got together again, the world would be so disappointed to see four rusty old men, as he put it," John Lennon's widow told London's Daily Mail. But his three surviving bandmates - Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr - have recorded their voices atop two songs Lennon taped before his 1980 murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1995 | By Rip Rense, FOR THE INQUIRER
Call it The Return of the Beatles. When the group broke up in 1970, it left behind much unfinished business: hundreds of hours of unreleased music and film. Now comes the real conclusion of the Fab Four's saga, beginning in late November with three major events: the release of two new "reunion" Beatles songs, ABC's airing of a Beatles- produced The Beatles Anthology documentary, and The Beatles Anthology, Vol. I, a double CD of unreleased music. Meanwhile, music industry sources confirmed that the three remaining Beatles will reunite to complete at least one more John Lennon home tape given to them by Yoko Ono. The song is reportedly one of the last that Lennon recorded, "Grow Old With Me," released as a home-recorded version on the Lennon-Ono album Milk and Honey in 1983.
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