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Beauty Shop

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NEWS
March 30, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sisterhood, not hair care, is at the heart of Beauty Shop - a distaff spin-off of the two Barbershop hits that deploys similarly saucy discourse about sex, race, politics and women's backsides. Queen Latifah, who strutted through Barbershop 2, stars as Gina, a single mom and stellar stylist freshly transplanted to Atlanta (from the Chicago of Barbershop) for the sake of her piano prodigy daughter, the recipient of a prestigious scholarship. Working for the flamboyant, Austrian-accented Jorge (played by - who else?
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Alice A. Sheppard, former owner and operator of Sheppard's Beauty Salon and an active church member, died Wednesday. She was 76 and lived in South Philadelphia. For more than 20 years Sheppard operated her beauty salon in her home on Dickinson Street neat 21st. After a heart attack in 1970, she retired and closed her business. The former Alice Jones, she waited until most of her children were grown before going into business. She attended the Donaldson Beauty School in Philadelphia and, through word of mouth, quickly had a thriving business that drew customers from all over the city.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Picture this: A woman walks into a beauty salon on the second floor of the Liberty Place shopping complex and asks the receptionist the price of a haircut. "Oh, we can't cut your hair," comes the reply. The woman, sensing snobbery, retorts, "What do you mean, isn't this a beauty shop?" "Yes," answers the receptionist. "But, this is a beauty shop for men only. " This exchange happened a few weeks ago at Style of Man, which bills itself as the area's only beauty shop for men. Founded by longtime beauticians Kathy Thomas and Laura Gioffre, the all- female staffed shop is out to give men the kind of pampering that women are used to. Offered are scalp massages, therapeutic shampoos, manicures, beard and mustache trims, haircuts and shoe shines.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Beauty Shop, the touring production at the Shubert Theater, is a situation comedy aimed at blacks that goes for laughs in the most obvious, not to say cheapest, ways. The play is written, directed and produced by one Shelly Garrett, an actor who never - but never - overestimates the taste and/or sophistication of his audience whether writing, directing or producing. The setting is a beauty shop in Los Angeles, a place of swirling hostilities where fat is funny and gay is hysterical.
NEWS
January 11, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The young lady strutted into Renee's Hair Design in Wilmington recently for her usual hair appointment. Suddenly, she stopped in midstride and gasped to shop owner Renee Richards: "Oh, my God. Get me out of here. " "What's wrong?" a startled Richards asked. The young lady pointed at a customer who was getting her hair coiffed by one of the beauticians. "I'm going with her husband," she whispered. "Oh, yeah!" Richards said yesterday, bursting into laughter at the thought of the near-disastrous encounter between the mistress and the wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Caramel is Beauty Shop- in-Beirut, a fem-centric tale of bonding and blow-drying about five Lebanese women and their respective struggles with family, friends, romance and coifs. Written and directed by Nadine Labaki, who cast herself as the owner of the busy salon, Caramel takes its title from the sugary concoction used to remove unwanted body hair from patrons - but aptly applies to the sweet, sensual tone of the film itself. Set in a culture caught between East and West, between male chauvinism and female empowerment, Labaki's movie isn't about to revolutionize a genre - its charms are modest, but many.
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | By Maria Panaritis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carol Stewart hopped like Mary Poppins on her way to the corner beauty shop to vote last night. Fierce winds almost swept her off her feet, golf-sized umbrella and all. But Stewart, 49, was all smiles as she made the half-block trip down Brill Street to vote for mayor. It was her first city election in 18 years, and she couldn't have wished for a better horse race than the contest between Democrat John F. Street and Republican Sam Katz. She wanted a piece of the action. "I'm so excited," she said, virtually singing.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her elbows resting on the appointment book at Flanary's beauty shop, hairdresser Martene Harper watched with despair yesterday as the mayor of Nashville smugly defended himself on national television. Mayor Bill Boner, 45, was talking about his sex life - which television host Phil Donahue pointed out had already earned the mayor a new nickname. Seven-hour Boner. This was the mayor whose fiancee boasted to a local reporter that their passion endures seven hours - the mayor of a Bible Belt city who became engaged to nightclub singer Traci Peel, 34, while he was still married to wife No. 3. "No kidding," Donahue told viewers in an estimated 6.2 million households across the country, "this is the mayor of Nashville, has been since 1987, (and)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2005 | Daily News
1. "Sahara" $18.5 million 2. "Sin City" $14.1 million 3. "Fever Pitch" $13 million 4 . A tie between "Beauty Shop" and "Guess Who": $7.1 million 6. "Robots" $4.65 million 7. "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous" $4.1 million 8. "The Pacifier" $3 million 9. "The Ring 2" $2.9 million 10. "The Upside of Anger" $2.6 million ---- Estimated ticket sales for Friday through yesterday at North American...
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
An elegantly dressed black crowd streamed out of the Shubert Theater on a recent evening, talking excitedly and laughing uproariously. Among them were Valeri Henderson, 31, and her daughter Tanisha, 11, who have become regular theatergoers this year. In January, Henderson, of Mount Airy, took her daughter to see Beauty Shop, Shelly Garrett's comedy with an all-black cast about the outrageous doings in a black hair salon. In March they saw Momma Don't, a black gospel musical about a churchwoman who falls into a life of crack and prostitution.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | Howard Gensler, Staff Writer
The latest version of The Jungle Book had a lot more than the bare necessities at the box office. The movie opened with $103.6 million in North America, making it one of the biggest April debuts ever at the box office and continuing Disney's streak of unearthing live-action riches buried in its animated classics ( Cinderella , Alice in Wonderland , Maleficent ). Jon Favreau 's update of the 1967 animated version of Rudyard Kipling 's 1894 book tells the tale of Mowgli with computer-generated imagery and big-screen bombast.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2015 | Howard Gensler, Daily News
Tattle has never understood why so many movies and TV shows have to be remade. No artist looks at the Mona Lisa and says, "I'd like to re-paint that. " It's art. And even if it's crappy, commercial art, it exists. Why do it again? We get that some older movies or characters can be improved by technology (comic book movies, for instance) and some stories can get a new interpretation or twist, but when we saw yesterday that ABC was filming a three-hour musical adaptation of the 1987 film "Dirty Dancing," originally starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze , and now to star Abigail Breslin and a hunk to be named later, the first thought that popped into our addled mind was "Why?"
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ERNESTINE McCASKILL fancied herself something of a card shark. Pinochle was her game, and she was good at ignoring distractions to pursue her mastery of the cards, including the apparent efforts of her son-in-law, Ronald Nixon, to throw her off her game. Ronald talked incessantly to disrupt her concentration, her family said, but she would say to the other players, "Aw, just let what he's saying roll off your back. " "She could make you laugh while playing any type of game," her family said.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy Katherine Jones, 92, formerly of Philadelphia, a pioneering golfer and business owner, died Monday, Jan. 6, of kidney failure in Knoxville, Tenn., at the home of her niece Toni Duval. Ms. Jones, known as Katherine, was born in the Jim Crow South, and used education and a robust network of friends and family to catapult herself into a fruitful life in the North. Like many of her contemporaries, she built a business and helped out the community in which she settled. "To me, this is a snapshot that people really don't think about," her niece said.
FOOD
October 26, 2012 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
The maturation of Philadelphia's high-end coffee scene has resulted in the proliferation of fresh-brewed java from independent shops throughout the region. But several neighborhoods west of Broad Street are experiencing particularly rapid growth, and even some competition among a new class of caffeinated entrepreneurs looking to perk up the enclaves that stretch toward the Schuylkill. Start in Center City. Among the most successful of the newcomers encroaching on the turf long ruled by Rittenhouse's La Colombe is Elixr Coffee, which Evan Inatome debuted quietly in 2011.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
MARIE'S BEAUTY Salon in Port Richmond was the place to go to hear a good story by an expert raconteur, have some laughs and, oh, yes, get your hair done.   For more than 50 years, Port Richmond ladies did just that, drawn to the shop at Cedar Avenue and Ann Street not only by the skill of the hairdressers but by the captivating personality of the owner, Marie T. "Nan" Baker. Nan could tell a joke or a funny story — complete with sometimes politically incorrect dialects — to compete with most comics.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
SOMETIMES a preacher is faced with the challenge of helping people cope with unspeakable tragedy.   Rev. Gregory E. Boykin faced such a challenge when he gave the eulogy at the funeral of a beloved 6-year-old girl who was among four people, including two other children, killed by a car being chased by police in Feltonville in June 2009. The car rammed into a group of people on the sidewalk on 3rd Street near Annsbury. Boykin, who had just returned from North Carolina, where he had buried his mother, tried in his sermon at Deliverance Evangelistic Church in North Philadelphia to encourage the mourners to believe that little Aaliyah Griffin was in heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2012 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Never dismiss the power of an excellent cast to supply some brio to a wan play. Good thing, too, because I can't imagine a so-so cast trying to bring off   the dated Steel Magnolias , whose characters often toss barbs that seem more scripted than natural. But at Bristol Riverside Theatre, where Steel Magnolias opened Thursday night, at least I found joy in watching superior acting. And not just that - superior ensemble acting. The story of six women living close-knit, hick-town lives takes place in a beauty shop, where the characters are almost always together during the four scenes spanning two acts.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
THE BRUTAL economy - paired with the rising cost of human-hair weaves and extensions - has led to some unbeweaveably brazen thefts at salons and beauty shops in the city and around the country. Elena, a manager of the House of Beauty on Chestnut Street near 12th, said those in search of longer locks for less have snatched packs of hair from the racks, or vaulted behind the counter and stolen them from glass cases. Some have even resorted to stashing the weaves in baby strollers, she said, or using children as mules to smuggle the contraband out of the store.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
In many parts of the city, parents of public school students are looking for new ways to raise money for their children's education, knowing that Harrisburg is likely to continue cutting aid. At Bache-Martin Elementary, serving Francisville and Fairmount, parents hope beauty will send a few dollars their way. The Home and School Association there has teamed with neighborhood beauty salons, which have agreed to donate a portion of their March...
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