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NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For much of his 20-year career as a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, Anthony J. Sciscione has been criticizing something obstetricians routinely prescribe to try to prevent premature birth: bed rest. Counterintuitive as it may seem, studies consistently show that pregnant women who lay around for hours at a time, day after day, are just as likely to deliver too early as women who carry on with their normal activities. Now, Sciscione and like-minded iconoclasts are hammering the mounting evidence that activity restriction during pregnancy is not just unhelpful, but harmful.
NEWS
May 29, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Yardley woman alleging a Kmart employee ran into her with a shopping cart full of holiday toys has filed suit against the chain. Mary Catherine Stabenaue, 48, said the incident had left her in severe pain. Kmart headquarters did not return phone calls seeking comment. Stabenaue said she was doing her Christmas shopping at the Langhorne Kmart on Lincoln Highway with her husband, Walter, when she was struck in the back by a shopping cart. "I was standing at the end of an aisle looking at pillows," Stabenaue said yesterday.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | By Mary Walton, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Hospital is looking for healthy adults from 25 to 40 years of age, for a study of the effects of bed rest on muscle metabolism. The study is funded by NASA and includes a six-day bed rest in the hospital. Volunteers will be compensated. Stephen Phillips read the ad last fall and reached for the phone. What he heard sounded too good to be true. No dangerous drugs and $100 a day. "Where can you go and relax for six days and get paid for it?" Plus, in his own little way, Phillips could contribute to the conquest of space and perhaps ease human suffering.
NEWS
April 29, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
All they wanted was some pizza. The two teenagers had just left the shop in the 2200 block of Cecil B. Moore Avenue Sunday night when an armed robber confronted them, Philadelphia police said. The gunman demanded money, then struck one of the boys in the face with the handgun. The other teen turned and tried to ride away on his bicycle. But Qa'id Staten, 17, couldn't outpedal a bullet. Police said the gunman opened fire at Staten, who fell off his bike. And as the teenager lay on the ground, the gunman stood over him and pulled the trigger again.
NEWS
September 29, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Even after half a century in the music business, Willie Nelson still plays like he's the evening's entertainment. His show at the Tower Theater Friday night was a model of efficiency: 30 songs in 90 minutes, with little in the way of flourishes or between-song patter. At 10 minutes past the scheduled start time of 8 p.m., Nelson, clad all in black save his signature bandanna, strode unassumingly onstage and commenced to let his music do the talking. Moment of Forever, Nelson's latest CD, was playing on the P.A. as the audience filed in, but that was about all the airing his new material got. Apart from the plangent "Over You Again" and the wry "You Don't Think I'm Funny Anymore," both from the new record, most of the rest of the set list could have been drawn from any of Nelson's more generous greatest-hits collections.
SPORTS
May 4, 1995 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Should Eric Lindros ignore his injured eye and play hockey? A parent wouldn't have any problem with that question - "You stay home, and that's that!" But eye doctors were less firm. Asked yesterday how they would handle an injury like Lindros', a handful of local eye experts said that they might advise more resting time for the eye to heal, but resumption of normal activity - including hockey - probably would not be too risky. They stressed, though, that Lindros should wear protective eye gear, not only because it's a good idea for all hockey players but because re-injury of the eye could be far worse than the first injury.
SPORTS
October 25, 2011 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was billed as the first-ever matchup of the Schenn brothers - the Flyers' Brayden and the Toronto Maple Leafs' Luke. About 12 minutes into Monday's matchup, however, it became known as The Game That Could Change the Flyers' Season. Chris Pronger, the team's captain and undisputed leader, was struck in the face by an inadvertent stick - Mikhail Grabovski was following through on his shot when he struck the defenseman - and the future Hall of Famer dashed off the ice in excruciating pain, holding his right eye. But the injury doesn't seem as bad as initially feared.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2003 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Colleen Snyder wept at her son Alexander's christening. "It was because I was so happy," she said. "I never thought I'd see him do this. There for a while we didn't think he was going to make it. " Snyder had already given birth to two children after uneventful, full-term pregnancies. Then, in April 2000, Snyder's water broke in her 27th week of pregnancy with Alex. (Full term is 40 weeks.) She was admitted to Bryn Mawr Hospital and, to delay the onset of labor, was not allowed out of bed for five days.
SPORTS
May 14, 2005 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It wasn't too long ago when all Shardae Anderson had to do was show up. Just the sight of the Paulsboro senior standing in the next lane overwhelmed most opponents. Competitors and fans knew Anderson would win the 100 meters. But Anderson's invincible status took a hit after the Camden/Gloucester County Relays in early April. That's around the time when the defending Group 1 100 and 200 champion and the Meet of Champions 100 runner-up was diagnosed with mononucleosis.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
The dancing leaves, all gold and red and yellow, are beautiful . . . and horrible in a back-breaking kind of way. What's going around this time of year, said Dr. Andrew Star, is leaf- raker's back. The orthopedic surgeon from Abington Memorial Hospital said that rakers are great candidates for back pain if they rake while bending forward or hoist huge bags of leaves while bending and lifting the wrong way. Problem is, it's easy to strain your back. There's a lot that can go wrong.
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NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For much of his 20-year career as a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, Anthony J. Sciscione has been criticizing something obstetricians routinely prescribe to try to prevent premature birth: bed rest. Counterintuitive as it may seem, studies consistently show that pregnant women who lay around for hours at a time, day after day, are just as likely to deliver too early as women who carry on with their normal activities. Now, Sciscione and like-minded iconoclasts are hammering the mounting evidence that activity restriction during pregnancy is not just unhelpful, but harmful.
SPORTS
October 25, 2011
THE THING that is hard to forget is the panic. Chris Pronger is as confident a player, on the ice and with the media, as any of us has seen - any sport, any time, not an exaggeration. Then the stick hit him in the eye, a follow-through of a shot by Toronto's Mikhail Grabovski, and the reaction was so hard to process. Pronger covered his face immediately. Then he got to his feet and was so frantically assisted from the ice. That was the thing. There was Pronger, whose game is about size and strength and snarl, about body positioning and economy of movement and the restoring of order.
SPORTS
October 25, 2011 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was billed as the first-ever matchup of the Schenn brothers - the Flyers' Brayden and the Toronto Maple Leafs' Luke. About 12 minutes into Monday's matchup, however, it became known as The Game That Could Change the Flyers' Season. Chris Pronger, the team's captain and undisputed leader, was struck in the face by an inadvertent stick - Mikhail Grabovski was following through on his shot when he struck the defenseman - and the future Hall of Famer dashed off the ice in excruciating pain, holding his right eye. But the injury doesn't seem as bad as initially feared.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011 | By KENNETH TURAN, Los Angeles Times "P
OINT BLANK" will leave you breathless. Unfolding at a blistering clip from its slam-bang opening through its bravura close, it grips you at frame one and doesn't let go. A tiptop French thriller that's reminiscent of films from Alfred Hitchcock to 2006's "Tell No One," "Point Blank" is genre all the way. Its story of an ordinary man facing extraordinary peril doesn't go anywhere we haven't gone before, but seeing familiar material presented with such...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2011 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
Derrick Beckles was not particularly happy working in the television industry. "I would just come home and want to brush my teeth with a shotgun," Beckles said. To abate thoughts of dental hygiene-by-firearm, Beckles would transform himself into Pinky Carnage, the mad, splicing scientist behind "TV Carnage," a series of DVD mix-tapes culling the most wacked-out clips from all corners of the television landscape. " 'TV Carnage' is like a head enema," Beckles said. Tonight he's bringing the live iteration of "TV Carnage" to International House.
NEWS
September 29, 2008 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
Even after half a century in the music business, Willie Nelson still plays like he's the evening's entertainment. His show at the Tower Theater Friday night was a model of efficiency: 30 songs in 90 minutes, with little in the way of flourishes or between-song patter. At 10 minutes past the scheduled start time of 8 p.m., Nelson, clad all in black save his signature bandanna, strode unassumingly onstage and commenced to let his music do the talking. Moment of Forever, Nelson's latest CD, was playing on the P.A. as the audience filed in, but that was about all the airing his new material got. Apart from the plangent "Over You Again" and the wry "You Don't Think I'm Funny Anymore," both from the new record, most of the rest of the set list could have been drawn from any of Nelson's more generous greatest-hits collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services and Brad Guigar contributed to this report
JUST WHEN you thought reality television couldn't crawl any lower, "Long Island Lolita" Amy Fisher and Joey and Mary Jo Buttafuoco have agreed to appear together in a TV reunion. All three have signed on for the appearance, which has yet to be sold to a network, shameless producer David Krieff told the New York Post. "It's time to just put it behind us," Fisher, now 31(and with all her facial muscles), told the Post. "We played this all out in a public eye. It'd be interesting to let the public see the healing process at the end. They saw everything else - why not let them see the final product?"
NEWS
July 15, 2005 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Last month LeAnn Beloyan of North Hanover, Burlington County, gave birth to two sets of identical twins, an event that happens once in every 25 million births, according to her doctors. The quadruplets, identical boys and identical girls conceived through in vitro fertilization, weighed between 2 and 3 pounds when they were born one minute apart on June 7, eight weeks premature. This weekend the biggest one, Benjamin, now at 5 pounds, 2 ounces, and 17.8 inches long, is expected to be discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Capital Health System-Mercer Campus Hospital in Trenton.
SPORTS
May 14, 2005 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It wasn't too long ago when all Shardae Anderson had to do was show up. Just the sight of the Paulsboro senior standing in the next lane overwhelmed most opponents. Competitors and fans knew Anderson would win the 100 meters. But Anderson's invincible status took a hit after the Camden/Gloucester County Relays in early April. That's around the time when the defending Group 1 100 and 200 champion and the Meet of Champions 100 runner-up was diagnosed with mononucleosis.
NEWS
September 21, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reality TV guru Mark Burnett, who helped ruin the tube forever with shows such as Survivor and The Apprentice, has confirmed he wants to help Martha Stewart retool her show once she serves her five-month federal prison sentence for obstruction of justice and conspiracy related to a stock deal. Burnett tells the New York Daily News that he is "very interested in reinventing" Martha Stewart Living, which hasn't been seen since Stewart's legal woes began. He offered no specifics, other than to say that it would be essential to keep Stewart's image as the arbiter of good taste and good living.
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