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Bedouin

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NEWS
March 21, 1994 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bulldozers first appeared last summer on the crest above the tin shanties and ramshackle barns. Their arrival marked the end of an uneasy truce that had existed for years between 85 families of Bedouins, the traditional nomads whose scrap-metal homes clustered on the rocky West Bank slopes, and the Jewish settlers across the road who filled the hilltops with white-stone apartment towers and rows of red-tiled roofs. The appearance of the bulldozers meant the time had finally arrived for the settlement of Ma'ale Adumim to spread across the street.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ancient way of life is threatened by a modern way of death here in the scorching Kuwaiti desert. For generations, the Bedouin of the eastern Arabian peninsula have grazed their flocks on the thin blades of grass poking through the endless sands. But the desert is now heavy with a new harvest: a crop of land mines planted by the Iraqi army and unexploded cluster bombs dropped by American aircraft. That has many of the Bedouin counting sheep - dead and mutilated sheep - and coming to grips with the fact that their centuries-old way of life may be all but over here.
NEWS
June 11, 2006 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Among the close-knit Bedouin tribes of the northern Sinai, anger toward the Egyptian government runs as bitter as the salt water that flows from the faucets in their homes and the wells on their farms. They aren't allowed into the top ranks of the military or security forces; they are routinely denied admission to prestigious universities; and most do not own the land their families have worked for generations. Even before at least eight of their own were identified as suicide bombers - men who killed more than 100 people in a two-year series of attacks on Egyptian resorts - elders worried that a growing number of youths were turning to radical Islam as a salve for their humiliation.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
PETRA, Jordan - We knew the night would be a little different than expected when at check-in Mahmoud cheerfully informed us, "I've upgraded you to a cave. " That was our introduction to staying at a Bedouin camp in Jordan. We had visions of dusty tents with Persian rugs underfoot and the odd camel lumbering by. This was true enough, but we were directed to our cave, a hole in the wall (literally) that barely had room for a floor mat, with enough striped pillows to fill a Martha Stewart home furnishings catalog.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The opening performance of Naomi by actress Ruby Porat-Shoval was delayed for an hour Wednesday night so the actress could have a little extra time to recover from her long overseas flight. When the show began, it was easy to see why she needed every minute of rest she could wangle. Porat-Shoval invests every ounce of energy she has in her performance. She is a passionate, intense, active actress who draws an audience into - and holds it firmly within - the force field of her stage personality.
NEWS
March 6, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
That Moammar Gadhafi! Ignore the endangered Libyan strongman's fashion sense - it's unlike anyone else's. On the planet. In human history. Focus, instead, on how he speaks. It turns out relatively few in the Arabic-speaking world can understand him when he talks. Not his ideas so much - the actual Arabic he uses. When Gadhafi speechifies, cable channels such as Al-Jazeera and Al-Arabiya, which use Modern Standard Arabic, often use an interpreter. Even many Libyans have trouble.
NEWS
March 21, 1989 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, USA Today and the New York Daily News
Margo Adams, who has made a career out of a defunct affair with baseball star Wade Boggs, has been arrested and charged with trying to shoplift a $258 coat from a department store in Costa Mesa, Calif. She was charged on Sunday, then released on her own recognizance after signing an agreement to appear in court later. In January, Adams, 33, pleaded guilty to running up $4,871 in bills at several stores with a charge card that wasn't hers. She was ordered to pay restitution and was put on three years informal probation.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2012 | By Heidi Hayes, For The Inquirer
"Egypt! Isn't that dangerous? Are you sure you want to go there?" What were we going to encounter in Egypt? The troubles that followed the Arab Spring of 2011 had convinced most Americans that Egypt was unsafe and dangerous. Were we concerned? Perhaps a bit, so we checked with the most reliable sources we could find and decided to go. Any concerns we had disappeared when we stepped off the plane in Cairo and saw the warm smile of Yasser, our Deluxe Travel tour coordinator. For 12 days, we explored the sights of Egypt, astonished to be standing next to the Pyramids, amazed at the structures, statues, and even the paint that had survived centuries beyond our comprehension.
NEWS
August 29, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Body parts in Tupperware cost biology prof his job A University of Florida neurology professor was arrested after police found preserved heads, brains and other body parts at his house, some stored in Tupperware containers. Joseph James Warner, 49, was charged Tuesday with illegal storage and preservation of human remains and with domestic battery, both misdemeanors. He was released on $5,000 bail yesterday. Warner told officers he "conducted research at his home, including dissections of human and animal body parts," a police report said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The phrase senseless killing has, tragically, become a journalistic cliche, but if ever there's a death that shouldn't have happened it's the drive-by shooting of a teenage boy in the opening minutes of the potent and incendiaryIsraeli film Ajami . It's a sunny day, and the kid is bent over a car in front of his family's house when a vehicle rolls by and gunmen shoot him in the back. The bullets were intended for the boy's teenage cousin, Omar (Shahir Kabaha), an Israeli Arab who stood up to some Bedouin mobsters and is now on their hit list.
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TRAVEL
September 30, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
PETRA, Jordan - We knew the night would be a little different than expected when at check-in Mahmoud cheerfully informed us, "I've upgraded you to a cave. " That was our introduction to staying at a Bedouin camp in Jordan. We had visions of dusty tents with Persian rugs underfoot and the odd camel lumbering by. This was true enough, but we were directed to our cave, a hole in the wall (literally) that barely had room for a floor mat, with enough striped pillows to fill a Martha Stewart home furnishings catalog.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2012 | By Heidi Hayes, For The Inquirer
"Egypt! Isn't that dangerous? Are you sure you want to go there?" What were we going to encounter in Egypt? The troubles that followed the Arab Spring of 2011 had convinced most Americans that Egypt was unsafe and dangerous. Were we concerned? Perhaps a bit, so we checked with the most reliable sources we could find and decided to go. Any concerns we had disappeared when we stepped off the plane in Cairo and saw the warm smile of Yasser, our Deluxe Travel tour coordinator. For 12 days, we explored the sights of Egypt, astonished to be standing next to the Pyramids, amazed at the structures, statues, and even the paint that had survived centuries beyond our comprehension.
NEWS
February 5, 2012 | By Aya Batrawy, Associated Press
CAIRO - Their kidnappers gave them tea and dried fruit and talked about religion and tribal rights. The California women were allowed to bring their Egyptian tour guide with them. One kidnapper even put out his cigarette in the car when a hostage said the smoke was bothering her. The two women abducted for several hours Friday by armed Bedouin tribesmen in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula hesitated to call the men captors, saying the kidnappers were kind, polite, and hospitable. "All of this is an unforgettable memory," said Norma Supe, a nurse from Union City.
NEWS
March 6, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
That Moammar Gadhafi! Ignore the endangered Libyan strongman's fashion sense - it's unlike anyone else's. On the planet. In human history. Focus, instead, on how he speaks. It turns out relatively few in the Arabic-speaking world can understand him when he talks. Not his ideas so much - the actual Arabic he uses. When Gadhafi speechifies, cable channels such as Al-Jazeera and Al-Arabiya, which use Modern Standard Arabic, often use an interpreter. Even many Libyans have trouble.
NEWS
May 9, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The heat was on. Having landed a spectacularly high-profile concert in the first week of Shanghai's Expo 2010 on Friday, the Philadelphia Orchestra and various partner organizations sweated bullets to get maximum mileage out of the situation, under the kind of inexplicably restrictive circumstances that prompt an oh-well-that's-China shrug. To prepare for Friday's rehearsals, news conference, lavish reception, and concert - tailored for the expansive, architecturally spectacular Expo Culture Center - the orchestra's staff pulled all-night work sessions and improvised last-minute remedies for potentially fatal problems.
NEWS
May 9, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SHANGHAI, China - The heat was on. Having landed a spectacularly high-profile concert in the first week of Shanghai's Expo 2010 on Friday, the Philadelphia Orchestra and various partner organizations sweated bullets to get maximum mileage out of the situation, under the kind of inexplicably restrictive circumstances that prompt an oh-well-that's-China shrug. To prepare for Friday's rehearsals, news conference, lavish reception, and concert - tailored for the expansive, architecturally spectacular Expo Culture Center - the orchestra's staff pulled all-night work sessions and improvised last-minute remedies for potentially fatal problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The phrase senseless killing has, tragically, become a journalistic cliche, but if ever there's a death that shouldn't have happened it's the drive-by shooting of a teenage boy in the opening minutes of the potent and incendiaryIsraeli film Ajami . It's a sunny day, and the kid is bent over a car in front of his family's house when a vehicle rolls by and gunmen shoot him in the back. The bullets were intended for the boy's teenage cousin, Omar (Shahir Kabaha), an Israeli Arab who stood up to some Bedouin mobsters and is now on their hit list.
NEWS
June 11, 2006 | By Hannah Allam INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Among the close-knit Bedouin tribes of the northern Sinai, anger toward the Egyptian government runs as bitter as the salt water that flows from the faucets in their homes and the wells on their farms. They aren't allowed into the top ranks of the military or security forces; they are routinely denied admission to prestigious universities; and most do not own the land their families have worked for generations. Even before at least eight of their own were identified as suicide bombers - men who killed more than 100 people in a two-year series of attacks on Egyptian resorts - elders worried that a growing number of youths were turning to radical Islam as a salve for their humiliation.
NEWS
August 29, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Body parts in Tupperware cost biology prof his job A University of Florida neurology professor was arrested after police found preserved heads, brains and other body parts at his house, some stored in Tupperware containers. Joseph James Warner, 49, was charged Tuesday with illegal storage and preservation of human remains and with domestic battery, both misdemeanors. He was released on $5,000 bail yesterday. Warner told officers he "conducted research at his home, including dissections of human and animal body parts," a police report said.
FOOD
June 20, 2001 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Joan Nathan took 30 years of food experiences and turned them into a national family album. The nation is Israel. The album is Nathan's latest cookbook, The Foods of Israel Today (Alfred A. Knopf, $40). And it proves that Jews, Muslims and Christians can coexist, at least in the kitchen. Nathan, the author of five other Jewish cookbooks and host of the PBS series Jewish Cooking in America (which has aired locally on WHYY), committed to writing the book in 1995 after the assassination of Israeli Prime Minister Itzhak Rabin.
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