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NEWS
July 23, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin Williams, the 17-year-old captain of his high school basketball team, is sitting in the doctor's office complaining of a constant headache. In reality, the "patient" is Matt Saunders, 25, an actor and set designer. The doctor, though, is real: Shahram Sani works at Abington Memorial Hospital. This little exercise is designed to test his bedside manner. Technically, the "clinical skills assessment" measures the ability to gather information, perform physical examinations, and effectively communicate with patients.
NEWS
July 24, 1993 | By Mary Otto, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Joycelyn Elders, President Clinton's nominee for surgeon general, survived hot lights and querying senators at a hearing yesterday and appears on track for a successful confirmation. A small, solid figure under the glare of scrutiny, she answered questions from members of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee in her characteristically plain-spoken, tart-tongued way. Elders, a pediatrician, researcher and former Arkansas health director, used stories from her childhood on an Arkansas farm to explain her commitment to public health, especially to the poor and young.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
For most of his life, Oscar W. DeShields was a doctor. Now, DeShields, 84, is using his bedside manner to help older workers find jobs. "I interview, talk to them and find out their skills," said DeShields, who after retiring from medicine went to work for the Mayor's Commission on Services to the Aging. Commission officials point to him as an example of how dependable an older worker can be. Today, DeShields will be recognized for his commitment at the Second Careers Fair at Community College of Philadelphia, 17th and Spring Garden streets.
NEWS
July 30, 2002
Jane Eisner's column on the passing of Chaim Potok ("Potok dipped into his well of creativity to the end," July 24), got it exactly right: Potok was a role model for the felicitous creativity that ensues when one culture encounters other cultures in a spirit of curiosity and respect for "wherever the truth leads. " Jews have been interacting with others for 3,500 years, but nowhere has that cultural interaction been as safe, open and productive as in America (despite all the distractions of modern life's commercial nonsense)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Crawlspace. " A thriller starring Klaus Kinski. Written and directed by David Schmoeller. Photographed by Sergio Salvato. Edited by Bert Glastein. Music by Pino Donaggio. Running time: 77 minutes. An Empire release. In area theaters. 'You have to learn how to laugh, Martha," mad Dr. Karl Gunther tells his cowering caged prisoner, whose tongue he has extracted. "It makes getting through life a lot easier. " If only Dr. Gunther's methods of treatment were as comforting as his bedside manner.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
YES, BOSS Today is National Boss Day, and if you really want to do something nice for yours, forget the cards and flowers. That advice comes from Robert Half, founder of Robert Half International, a personnel-recruiting company, who says employees who want to ingratiate themselves with the boss should skip the gifts and consider volunteering for more work and showing up on time. RADIATION AND ACNE If you were one of those in the 1930s and 1940s who got then-common radiation therapy for acne, you should be checked for malignant tumors in the largest saliva gland.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1990 | Esquire magazine, the New York Post and the New York Daily News contributed to this report
SPEAKING OF BEATTY We knew Warren Beatty would return to our field of vision as the premiere of "Dick Tracy" neared. (Mark your calendar; it's now set for June 15.) This week, he's in Esquire. Not being interviewed, mind you, but being reviewed - for his, how should we say, bedside manner. "If he ever retires," the mag said, "a whole way of life goes with him. " Here's a sampling of the quotes about Beatty from interviews and books. Joan Collins: "He was insatiable.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At No. 1, for all the good it'll do her Entertainment Tonight's annual Hot List is out, baby. And when that happens, people take notice. The list, which officially will be announced Monday on ET, features celebs from all walks of celebrityhood who have been ranked according to how many times they have been mentioned this year on the syndicated ent & celeb show. The winningest celeb is the late Anna Nicole Smith, who died Feb. 8. Her daughter, Dannielynn Birkhead, is No. 2. America's favorite Mouseketeer-turned-custody-battle-casualty, Britney Spears, is at No. 3, while her counterpart, squeaky-clean Mrs. Responsibility, Marie Osmond, is No. 4. Celeb in shining armor Brad Pitt rounds out the top five.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Imagine Ally McBeal featuring two buff Boston attorneys, GWMs seeking soul mates with brains, bods and bank accounts equal to theirs, and you have All the Rage, a comic cautionary tale about how the heart and eyes have different appetites. It is a movie for anyone whose romantic hopes ever have been dashed by that ugliest phrase in the English language, those three little words: "I'll call you. " This diverting, delicious and finally damning story marks the feature debut of filmmaker Roland Tec, who adapted it from his play A Better Boy. With crisp dialogue, crisper editing and a dynamic use of film and video, Tec creates characters who evoke both desire and disgust.
NEWS
January 2, 2008 | PHIL GOLDSMITH
"WE ARE IN the midst of a tax cutting craze," City Controller Alan Butkovitz said at a press conference as 2007 was coming to a close. Butkovitz made his comment as he released an audit on the Fire Department's Emergency Medical Services unit; the audit exposed a sluggish system being starved for resources despite the surging demands on its usage. Butkovitz's warning was music to my ears. It has been a refrain I have been singing for several years. There has not been enough balance between the clamor for tax reduction and residents' desire for quality services, both of which are essential for a city that aspires to world class status.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the sort of encounter between a doctor and patient that, unfortunately, happens all the time. This time, though, the patient was a psychologist's daughter and her experience led to research that is changing medical education. The girl, then 13 years old, and her mother went to a pediatric cardiologist because of heart palpitations. A long wait in the exam room amplified their worry. The doctor finally arrived and, without exchanging a greeting, said the girl needed to wear a heart monitor every day for a month.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
I finally forced myself to go by the chamber of horrors that was the Women's Medical Society - better known as Kermit Gosnell's abortion clinic. I've been trying to get there since the grand-jury report came out two weeks ago. But I couldn't work up the nerve. The gruesome details made me sick to my stomach. Two women dead. Scores illegally butchered for profit. Seven babies allegedly murdered at the hands of a doctor, a "man of the neighborhood. " The bigger the baby, the bigger the bill.
NEWS
January 2, 2008 | PHIL GOLDSMITH
"WE ARE IN the midst of a tax cutting craze," City Controller Alan Butkovitz said at a press conference as 2007 was coming to a close. Butkovitz made his comment as he released an audit on the Fire Department's Emergency Medical Services unit; the audit exposed a sluggish system being starved for resources despite the surging demands on its usage. Butkovitz's warning was music to my ears. It has been a refrain I have been singing for several years. There has not been enough balance between the clamor for tax reduction and residents' desire for quality services, both of which are essential for a city that aspires to world class status.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At No. 1, for all the good it'll do her Entertainment Tonight's annual Hot List is out, baby. And when that happens, people take notice. The list, which officially will be announced Monday on ET, features celebs from all walks of celebrityhood who have been ranked according to how many times they have been mentioned this year on the syndicated ent & celeb show. The winningest celeb is the late Anna Nicole Smith, who died Feb. 8. Her daughter, Dannielynn Birkhead, is No. 2. America's favorite Mouseketeer-turned-custody-battle-casualty, Britney Spears, is at No. 3, while her counterpart, squeaky-clean Mrs. Responsibility, Marie Osmond, is No. 4. Celeb in shining armor Brad Pitt rounds out the top five.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Still befuddled and aggrieved at the devastating news that Charlie Sheen and Denise Richards' marriage has done a Hindenberg, the world is hit with more woe: Chris Klein and Katie Holmes have decided not to tempt fate by trying their hand at matrimony, Us Weekly reports. Chris, the 25-year-old American Pie star and the adoralicious Katie, 26, whose Dawson's Creek turn generated so much love from so many Americans, had dated for five years before becoming engaged in December '03. But Katie's rep does assure us that despite the bust-up, the couple "are remaining good friends.
NEWS
April 28, 2003 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marge Reed had been in remission for breast cancer for 4 1/2 years when she felt a lump in her breast and went to see her doctor. He examined the lump and noticed another one in a lymph node on her neck. A biopsy was taken, and after five hours of waiting, Reed's doctor gave her the news. "Well, of course you knew it was cancer," he said, referring to the breast lump. When she asked him about the lump in her lymph node, he said, "I have to assume it is cancer. I can't go around checking all lumps.
NEWS
July 30, 2002
Jane Eisner's column on the passing of Chaim Potok ("Potok dipped into his well of creativity to the end," July 24), got it exactly right: Potok was a role model for the felicitous creativity that ensues when one culture encounters other cultures in a spirit of curiosity and respect for "wherever the truth leads. " Jews have been interacting with others for 3,500 years, but nowhere has that cultural interaction been as safe, open and productive as in America (despite all the distractions of modern life's commercial nonsense)
NEWS
July 23, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin Williams, the 17-year-old captain of his high school basketball team, is sitting in the doctor's office complaining of a constant headache. In reality, the "patient" is Matt Saunders, 25, an actor and set designer. The doctor, though, is real: Shahram Sani works at Abington Memorial Hospital. This little exercise is designed to test his bedside manner. Technically, the "clinical skills assessment" measures the ability to gather information, perform physical examinations, and effectively communicate with patients.
NEWS
December 15, 1998 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Eric Raps was a hard-working, compassionate neurologist who carved out a national niche for himself through his work on strokes. He nearly single-handedly built the University of Pennsylvania's stroke and neurointensive care unit while also starting a family and creating lasting bonds with his patients. On Wednesday, the brilliant 38-year-old took his own life through an overdose of medication. He left behind his wife, Maureen, 3-year-old son, Daniel, and parents, Nathan and Cecile Pollock Raps.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Imagine Ally McBeal featuring two buff Boston attorneys, GWMs seeking soul mates with brains, bods and bank accounts equal to theirs, and you have All the Rage, a comic cautionary tale about how the heart and eyes have different appetites. It is a movie for anyone whose romantic hopes ever have been dashed by that ugliest phrase in the English language, those three little words: "I'll call you. " This diverting, delicious and finally damning story marks the feature debut of filmmaker Roland Tec, who adapted it from his play A Better Boy. With crisp dialogue, crisper editing and a dynamic use of film and video, Tec creates characters who evoke both desire and disgust.
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