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NEWS
August 5, 1989 | By Jim Gladstone, Special to The Inquirer
As eerie blue light spread over the crowd and spidery lasers swept the stage of the Mann Music Center last night, the Bee Gees appeared in silhouette, like visitors from another planet. Then the distant superstars launched into a lightly rocking new tune - "Ordinary Lives. " After the glittery pomp of the trilling trio's arrival, this forgettable profession of being "ordinary people leading ordinary lives" was wildly inappropriate, a backhanded insult unfortunately missed by the real ordinary people who turned out to support the threesome.
NEWS
January 8, 2016
Robert Stigwood, 81, the impresario who managed the Bee Gees and produced 1970s blockbusters Grease and Saturday Night Fever , died Monday. Born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1934, Mr. Stigwood moved to Britain in the 1950s and soon became an astute player in Britain's embryonic rock music industry. In the 1960s, he managed rock group Cream and its guitarist Eric Clapton before signing brothers Barry, Maurice and Robin Gibb, collectively known as the Bee Gees, whose melodic folk-rock achieved late-'60s success before a career slump.
NEWS
January 13, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Maurice Gibb, one-third of the singing group the Bee Gees, whose songs provide a soundtrack of the disco era, died of cardiac arrest yesterday just before he was to undergo emergency surgery for a blocked intestine at a Miami Beach, Fla., hospital. He was 53. Mr. Gibb was part of one of the most resilient and prolific outfits in the history of popular music - a trio known for its pealing harmonies that sold millions of records, had nine No. 1 songs, netted seven Grammy Awards, and numbered among a handful of acts to make important contributions in several musical styles over three decades.
NEWS
May 22, 2012 | By Gregory Katz, ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — With his carefully tended hair, tight trousers, and perfect harmonies, Robin Gibb, along with his brothers Maurice and Barry, defined the disco era. As part of the Bee Gees — short for the Brothers Gibb — they created dance-floor classics like "Stayin Alive," "Jive Talkin'," and "Night Fever" that can still get crowds onto a dance floor. The catchy songs, with their falsetto vocals and relentless beat, are familiar pop-culture mainstays. There are more than 6,000 cover versions of the Bee Gees' hits, and they are still heard on dance floors and at wedding receptions, birthday parties, and other festive occasions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
To rock boys coming of age in the late '70s and early '80s, the brothers Gibb were known primarily as the fey, toothy, Members Only-jacketed target of the Disco Sucks backlash that greeted the blockbuster sales and grating ubiquity of their Saturday Night Fever soundtrack. But unbeknownst to many, the Bee Gees also had an amazing career in the '60s, creating deathless psychedelic-pop singles and ambitious album-length statements that explored complex themes and experimented with all manner of instrumentation and orchestral arrangements.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | Associated Press Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Andy Gibb, 30, who followed his brothers, the pop group the Bee Gees, to stardom but saw his career falter after he became heavily involved with drugs, died yesterday. Mr. Gibb died at John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, 50 miles northwest of London, at 8:45 a.m., a hospital statement said. The cause of death was not immediately announced. Press Association, the domestic British news agency, said Mr. Gibb was admitted to the hospital Monday, discharged, and then readmitted Wednesday night after complaining of stomach pains.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For all his accomplishments, there are things Barry Gibb has never done. As one-third of the Bee Gees, Gibb wrote, alone or with brothers Maurice and Robin, British psychedelia, pop, theatrical ballads, blue-eyed soul, disco smashes, and Euro-house. He wrote hits for brother Andy Gibb, Dionne Warwick, Barbra Streisand, and "Islands in the Stream" for Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton. Despite mega-success and tenure in the music biz, Gibb, 67, has had shockingly little opportunity to express himself apart from the Bee Gees: one solo album, Now Voyager , and two albums that he wrote for Streisand, Guilty and Guilty Pleasures . He recorded a baroque-pop effort, 1970's The Kid's No Good , that was shelved, with another unreleased solo, Moonlight Madness , and morphed into a soundtrack for the film Hawks . He has performed solo only infrequently.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014 | By Wesley Stace, For The Inquirer
'The City of Brotherly Love!" Barry Gibb announced Monday night at the Wells Fargo Center: "I know all about that!" The "Mythology Tour" is his first since the 2012 death of brother Robin. Barry, the oldest, is now the sole surviving Bee Gee. It's apparently easy to make fun of the Notorious BG - many people do. But jokes at the expense of his once-elegant coiffure, satin tour jacket, and flaring temper obscure a point so obvious it is rarely made: Gibb is the greatest songwriter of the modern pop era, adept in almost any genre, among its ablest chroniclers of the extremes of romance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1994 | By Martin Booe, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's early in the morning when Prisoner C89262 is ushered quietly into a sparsely furnished meeting room in the administrative wing of the California Men's Colony here. He wears a light blue nylon jumpsuit, prison-issue, and his whitening hair spikes up a little from a soon-to-be-renewed burr cut. Although a bit haggard, he is pleasant-looking, even handsome. His first visitor in . . . two years? Three? Five? He's not certain, but he does know that in his 11 years of incarceration here and elsewhere, he hasn't seen more than a half-dozen people from the outside.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The past has caught up with the future, or maybe it's the other way around, on the sweaty factory floor of Independent Record Pressing just off I-295 in Bordentown. Most of the workers there weren't born when what they're making today was big. General manager Sean Rutkowski, 46, was, though he came of age in the era of cassettes and CDs. But in a surprising return from near-death, vinyl records are back on the turntable, in demand by recording artists and music consumers alike after years of relegation to flea markets and used-record stores.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
Here's how simple it can be to bring someone back from the brink of death: It took just a few minutes Tuesday to train dozens of people in hands-only CPR. Eager volunteers, from teens to seniors, leaned over specially designed dummies outside the WHYY studios, pushing firm and fast to music selected to inspire the right speed: 100 beats a minute. As for pressure? The more the better, said Benjamin Abella, the physician who is leading the new Mobile CPR Project Philadelphia. No need to worry about further injuring a person in cardiac arrest, said Abella, who directs Penn's Center for Resuscitation Science.
NEWS
January 8, 2016
Robert Stigwood, 81, the impresario who managed the Bee Gees and produced 1970s blockbusters Grease and Saturday Night Fever , died Monday. Born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1934, Mr. Stigwood moved to Britain in the 1950s and soon became an astute player in Britain's embryonic rock music industry. In the 1960s, he managed rock group Cream and its guitarist Eric Clapton before signing brothers Barry, Maurice and Robin Gibb, collectively known as the Bee Gees, whose melodic folk-rock achieved late-'60s success before a career slump.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
When captain "Wild Bill" Razzano leads the Greater Overbrook String Band down Broad Street in the New Year's Day Mummers Parade, he'll be wearing an eye-popping costume designed by Art Institute of Philadelphia graduate Briana Bailey, 26, of Germantown. Bailey, who said, "I was trying hard not to float away," when she won the school's Mummers design contest, was inspired by her 18-month-old niece, Ellie, as the two sat watching old New Year's Day parades on PHL17's all-Mummers sub-channel 17.4.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2015 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why has Chris Tucker, big-screen comic foil, been crisscrossing the country doing stand-up shows? This is a guy who at the height of his popularity, when the Rush Hour movies made him for a time the highest-paid actor in Hollywood, never worked a day more than he had to. As he explained at the Tower Theater on Friday night, he owes a towering sum in back taxes. He joked that IRS agents were backstage as he performed, tallying the box office and eating chicken. His tax troubles are both the impetus and the foundation of his act. He complained about TMZ reporting his debt as more than $14 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Beyond an always ferocious, soul-stirring approach to guitar mastery, there's one thing longtime devotees of Gov't Mule and Warren Haynes have come to expect: the unexpected. Whatever twists are possible, Haynes will make them. The Southern-fried bluesman and his tactile, roaring quartet Gov't Mule give fans shows whose second sets ripple with cover versions. Most recently, whole sets of AC/DC and Neil Young songs have speckled their set list. Friday at Upper Darby's Tower Theater, the Mule stuffed songs by Tom Waits, Little Feat, the Bee Gees, Steppenwolf into that night's catalog.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
BOCA RATON, Fla. - A woman took Joseph Merlino's hand and towed him across the marble floor to her friends, who fussed over him, cooing. "The veal parmiagana! Fabulous!" somebody else told the maitre d' of the hot new Italian restaurant in South Florida that bears the family name. He had stopped to ask how they liked everything. "Loved the cheesecake," a woman said. "Is that your mother's recipe?" And so it went on a drizzly Friday night in the land of perpetual valet parking as the reputed former boss of the Philadelphia mob darted around the room, greeting diners.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE INTERVIEWED filmmaker Rian Johnson a couple years back at the Toronto International Film Festival and he was giddy with excitement over the release of his film "Looper. " The man behind "Brick" and "The Brothers Bloom," two artfully crafted indies, had finally gotten big studio money (by his standards) to make the sci-fi time-traveling "Looper," starring Bruce Willis , Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Emily Blunt . Well, Johnson must be bouncing off the walls now. He not only has the money and muscle of Disney and Lucasfilm behind his next venture, he has the Force.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2014 | By Wesley Stace, For The Inquirer
'The City of Brotherly Love!" Barry Gibb announced Monday night at the Wells Fargo Center: "I know all about that!" The "Mythology Tour" is his first since the 2012 death of brother Robin. Barry, the oldest, is now the sole surviving Bee Gee. It's apparently easy to make fun of the Notorious BG - many people do. But jokes at the expense of his once-elegant coiffure, satin tour jacket, and flaring temper obscure a point so obvious it is rarely made: Gibb is the greatest songwriter of the modern pop era, adept in almost any genre, among its ablest chroniclers of the extremes of romance.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For all his accomplishments, there are things Barry Gibb has never done. As one-third of the Bee Gees, Gibb wrote, alone or with brothers Maurice and Robin, British psychedelia, pop, theatrical ballads, blue-eyed soul, disco smashes, and Euro-house. He wrote hits for brother Andy Gibb, Dionne Warwick, Barbra Streisand, and "Islands in the Stream" for Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton. Despite mega-success and tenure in the music biz, Gibb, 67, has had shockingly little opportunity to express himself apart from the Bee Gees: one solo album, Now Voyager , and two albums that he wrote for Streisand, Guilty and Guilty Pleasures . He recorded a baroque-pop effort, 1970's The Kid's No Good , that was shelved, with another unreleased solo, Moonlight Madness , and morphed into a soundtrack for the film Hawks . He has performed solo only infrequently.
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