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NEWS
December 26, 2003
WHAT COLOR is mad-cow disease on the Homeland Security alert system? The newly discovered case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Washington state is not the reason Tom Ridge issued last week's "orange" warning. But the threat of BSE is worth taking seriously, maybe even more so than threats from outside terrorists. When it comes to preventing food-related illness, the enemy may be us. The mad-cow outbreak that led to the deaths of 153 humans, and the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of cattle in Europe has its roots, most speculate, in the diseased sheep that were being fed to livestock cattle.
NEWS
October 15, 1995
Beef? It's what's not for dinner, at least in its traditional "and- potatoes" form. Pork, the other white meat? Get that chop outtahere. Iceberg lettuce? Its appeal is melting away. But arugula? A-OK. Kiwi's catching on, shiitakes are shooting off the shelves, and crowds are milling in front of the gourmet shelves at Copps grocery in Appleton, Wis., a town more middle-American than which you cannot get. So saith the Wall Street Journal in an article that contends Americans who've never had a whiff of Walnut Street are now cooking more like Georges Perrier than Betty Crocker.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2007 | By BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
WHAT DO YOU get the carnivore on your list who has everything? Why, meat, of course. Even beyond kitchen gimcracks and gadgets, the ideal gift for the friend or loved one who loves great food is an experience - something he or she can touch, taste, feel, smell. Typically, this person dines out often, making a restaurant gift-certificate one step away from ho-hum. But he appreciates a good cut of meat and may be an expert grillmaster at home, quick to sear up inch-thick Delmonicos on his 154,000 B.T.U.
FOOD
April 9, 1986 | By CHRISTINE ARPE GANG, Special to the Daily News
When people shop for beef, they usually do it at a favorite supermarket or meat store, and tend to think the meat came from that particular store. But not too far in the future, beef will be sold as a brand item much as chicken and pork products are today. Rod Bowling, vice president of Monfort of Colorado Inc., said brand beef will change the way packers buy beef from producers and the way grocery stores market the product. Jim Gryzmala of Monfort said his company is conducting research for some supermarkets on brandname beef and also precooked beef.
FOOD
August 14, 1996 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I would like to know how Harmony Vegetarian Restaurant in Chinatown makes its orange beef. Helen T. Diehl Philadelphia Dear Helen, Peter Fong, the former chef at Harmony, is now the manager of Singapore Kosher Vegetarian Restaurant, also in Chinatown. He gave us this version of orange "beef," which is a popular dish at both places. Fong makes all his "meat," "poultry" and "seafood" dishes from tempeh, or soy gluten, a protein substitute that is available at most Asian markets and health-food stores.
FOOD
April 8, 2016
Makes 6 servings 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium onions, peeled and cut into 1/8-inch thick slices 2 pounds boneless beef (I used London broil), cut into 3/4-inch cubes 3 carrots, peeled and sliced diagonally into 1/4-inch thick rounds 3 potatoes, washed and sliced into 3/4-inch cubes 4 cups chicken stock (I used unsalted, then added salt to taste) Salt and pepper to taste (about 1 teaspoon salt if using unsalted stock)   1. Prep all your ingredients: Peel and slice onions.
NEWS
March 13, 2007
RE "KOBE: NO love in the 2-1-5": As much as Kobe Bryant would love to be embraced by MY hometown of Philly, he needs to realize that it just ain't gonna happen. Philadelphia loves the rest of our hometown professional athletes who represent that blue-collar Philly spirit, like Rasheed Wallace, Aaron McKie, Cuttino Mobley, and Rip Hamilton (even though he's officially from Coatesville). So what is it about Phonie Bryant that makes him draw boos here unlike any boos ever uttered for Santa Claus or Destiny's Child?
FOOD
April 13, 1988 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
My daddy told me once, "Son, never throw a necktie away!" That was Daddy's way of sayin' "what goes around, comes around," or "everything old will one day be new again. " Daddy was right! Seems he always was, especially when it came to meat. After all the bad rap, meat, particularly beef, has gotten in recent years, it seems "according to recent surveys" to be making a comeback. A survey conducted in January and June of 1987 by Walker Research Inc. showed "an increase in consumers' positive perception of beef during that period.
FOOD
January 20, 1988 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
I'm not as sure today as I was yesterday about what I knew for sure was true the day before. It's a bit unsettling. For years, I have believed that more people are disappointed with the beef they buy today because it hasn't been properly aged than for any other single reason. Well, last week we had a taste test. It's a bit unsettling. Albert Levie, president of Gulliver's Restaurants and one of this nation's foremost meat authorities, organized a taste test at his southern California restaurant in Marina del Rey to try to determine the effect of "dry" vs. "wet" aging on the palatability of beef steaks.
FOOD
November 5, 1986 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
Beef used to come to market in carcass form, with the bones still in. Yeah, it did. I know it's hard to believe. You seldom see a bone these days but that's the way beef used to come. All of the cutting was done on the premises by the butcher or butchers on duty and the cuts of beef were pretty basic, most often identified by the shape of the bone that was in them. You had, for example, your basic T-bone steak, then there was the sirloin steak which was either "round bone sirloin," or "flat bone sirloin" or "wedge bone sirloin," depending on the shape of the bone.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 29, 2016 | By Mike Kern, STAFF WRITER
SPRINGFIELD, N.J. - Where's the "Beef?" This week, he's at Baltusrol for the PGA Championship, his fourth major, coming off an eighth-place finish at the British Open. And it's doubtful anyone in the field is having a better time. Welcome to Andrew Johnston's hungry new world. The 27-year-old London native, who packs a listed 212 pounds on his 5-9 frame and sports a lumberjack's beard to go with an engaging personality that's endeared him to the masses, turned into a cult figure two weeks ago at Royal Troon where, at every tee, galleries were chanting the nickname he's worn proudly since childhood.
FOOD
July 1, 2016 | By Barry Zukerman, Staff Writer
When we think of beef short ribs, what generally comes to mind is the large boneless variety served braised in restaurants, or the crosscut ribs with three or four small pieces of bone in them that are found on supermarket shelves and in butcher display cases. But a mouthwatering photo of beef ribs on the cover of a barbecue cookbook recently brought back memories of the monstrous rack of Montreal-style smoked short ribs my party ordered at Abe Fisher, and the dinosaur bone I polished off at Fette Sau. As the Fourth of July approached, with a long weekend for a cooking project, I began my short ribs research for that very cut: I discovered that the most desirable cut for smoking (and the cut served at Abe Fisher and Fette Sau)
FOOD
June 30, 2016
Makes 3-5 servings One three-bone uncut rack of beef short ribs from the plate section of the rib cage, weighing 31/2 to 4 pounds (see note) Light olive oil (not virgin) 2 tablespoons kosher salt 2 tablespoons freshly cracked black pepper 1 can beef broth 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce Barbecue sauce (optional) 1. The night before you intend to smoke the ribs, place your wood chunks in water to soak until you need them. 2. Also the night before, rub the rack of ribs all over with a light coating of olive oil. Generously sprinkle the salt and pepper over the ribs, being sure to hit all sides.
FOOD
June 24, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
Most of the customers at Stargazy, chef Sam Jacobson's British pie-and-mash shop, come in very hungry and leave very happy. Most. "I've had a woman throw a tantrum here," says the relocated Londoner, who opened last fall on East Passyunk Avenue. The trigger for her freak-out: spotting the word tripe on Stargazy's menu board. Jacobson had made a pie filled with bits of the beef stomach, slow-cooked in the French style with cider, cream, brandy, mustard, and herbs, as a daily special.
FOOD
June 3, 2016
Makes 8 servings 5½ pounds beef cheeks 3 12-ounce bottles Flemish red ale 1 bouquet garni (sprigs of herbs such as thyme, bay leaf, basil, and rosemary tied together in a bundle) 1 pound onions, peeled and chopped Oil or butter for sauteing 1 quart veal stock ½ cup vinegar 8 tablespoons mustard 31/2 ounce slice gingerbread 1. The day before serving, cut the beef cheeks into pieces about 1½ inch square and place in a bowl along with three-quarters of the beer and the bouquet garni.
FOOD
April 15, 2016
Serves 6 to 8 1 tablespoon rendered animal fat or vegetable oil 3 pounds bone-in beef short ribs Fine sea salt and freshly ground pepper 2 carrots, chopped 2 celery ribs, chopped 1 onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, chopped 4 ounces dried or fresh shiitake mushroom stems 3 cups rich beef stock 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 8 cups whey (see recipe) 1/3 cup chopped oil-cured olives 2 tablespoons candied Valencia oranges (see recipe)
FOOD
April 8, 2016
Cristo Rey Cooking, especially with friends, can be a joyful and heartwarming experience. "I have created a lot of fun memories with my friends," said Axelle Anadja. "I love being with them as I chop, mince, and sauté the foods. " Sierra Mernick, who is training for the Broad Street Run, said: "The food has been consistently good and I have learned a lot about cooking and the proper methods of preparing. Cooking from scratch is a much healthier way to eat. " - Michelle Taplinger, Lauren Molish La Salle Academy Ding ding ding!
FOOD
April 8, 2016
Makes 6 servings 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium onions, peeled and cut into 1/8-inch thick slices 2 pounds boneless beef (I used London broil), cut into 3/4-inch cubes 3 carrots, peeled and sliced diagonally into 1/4-inch thick rounds 3 potatoes, washed and sliced into 3/4-inch cubes 4 cups chicken stock (I used unsalted, then added salt to taste) Salt and pepper to taste (about 1 teaspoon salt if using unsalted stock)   1. Prep all your ingredients: Peel and slice onions.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Philadelphia police and federal law enforcement authorities stepped up patrols at Philadelphia International Airport after the terrorist attacks Tuesday morning in Brussels. "Passengers should notice an increased visible presence of law enforcement both in, and around, the airport," airport spokeswoman Mary Flannery said. Philadelphia police and federal law enforcement officials patrolled the airport arrivals roadway, the departures road, and inside and outside security screening areas, Flannery said.
FOOD
March 11, 2016
Makes 6 servings 1/4 cup flour Fine sea salt Freshly ground black pepper 21/2 pounds chuck or other stew beef, cut into 2-inch cubes, patted dry 3 tablespoons flavorless oil, such as canola, or more as needed 6 slices thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 4 medium yellow onions, thinly sliced 4 cloves garlic (green germ removed), finely chopped One 12-ounce bottle Belgian, abbey, or brown ale or beer, such as Chimay 11/2 cups no-salt-added beef broth 21/2 tablespoons brown sugar (light or dark)
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