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Beef Products

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NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
More than 190 Pennsylvania school districts, including at least 19 in the Philadelphia area, received beef products from a California plant that issued a nationwide recall this week. State Agriculture Secretary Dennis Wolff said that while the health risk was low, the agency had told districts to dispose of any remaining beef. Because the recall affects products dating to 2006, most of the 126,000 pounds of beef shipped to Pennsylvania schools has likely been eaten. But thousands of pounds remain in school freezers, state officials said.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County meat-packing company and a corporate officer were fined a total of $875,000 yesterday for marketing "all-beef" products that actually contained chicken and pork. The C.D. Moyer Co. of Silverdale, a subsidiary of the Freda Corp. of Philadelphia, was fined $675,000. A $200,000 fine was levied against corporate secretary Matthew A. Giuffrida, 56, of Blue Bell, a one-time South Jersey migrant laborer whose family built Freda into a regional meat-packing business. The fines were part of a plea bargain agreed to Sept.
NEWS
March 9, 2013
By Erica Meier Headlines around the world have blared the scandal: Unwitting Britons who dined on hamburgers, meatballs, or other beef products were actually eating horse meat - and they're outraged. In fact, recent polls show that 20 percent of U.K. consumers are now eating less meat and 7 percent are saying "neigh" to meat altogether. In Philadelphia, the news seems to have had the opposite effect: At least one restaurant says it plans to add horse meat to its menu. The scandal raises many uncomfortable questions.
NEWS
February 21, 2008 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia parents' group sharply criticized the city school district and the USDA yesterday for not acting earlier to recall possibly tainted beef served to children in school cafeterias. An alert went out Tuesday to 196 school districts from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, advising them to remove most beef products from the schools. The beef may have originated at a California meat packing plant that slaughtered "downer" cattle and distributed the meat through the the USDA's School Lunch Program, state officials said.
NEWS
May 25, 2003
How many sick cows does it take to bring an industry to its knees? Just one, if the malady is bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease. In a matter of days, the discovery of a mad cow in Canada last week brought instant devastation to that country's $2.9 billion beef export industry. The United States - Canada's biggest beef customer - joined Australia, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea in temporarily banning all Canadian beef products, even dog food.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
Wash. candidate on 'the rape thing' OLYMPIA, Wash. - A Republican congressional candidate says abortion should not be legal, even when it involves "the rape thing," according to audio provided Wednesday to the Associated Press. An activist working on behalf of the liberal group FUSE Washington asked questions of Republican hopeful John Koster during a Sunday fund-raiser. Koster said he did not oppose abortion when the life of the mother was in danger, then explained he would oppose it when it involved rape or incest.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
Lax testing of food quality in school cafeterias is giving troubling new meaning to the term "mystery meat. " Congress is making a welcome push for higher food-testing standards following reports from government investigators and newspapers that shone a light on glaring gaps in safety standards. That comes in the face of numerous challenges to improving the food-safety system in general, as millions of people are sickened and 5,000 die annually from food-borne illnesses. Tracking the source of food contamination remains a major concern, as well as the efficiency of enacting recalls.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chester County may be known for its dairy farms, but cattle ranches? While this may not be the wide open ranges of Texas, the beef industry is on the upswing in the county. "A lot of the farms in Chester County that were dairy farms have converted to the beef industry, whether people are doing it as a hobby or a full-time job," said Gary Smith, steering committee chairman for the recently formed Southeast Regional Cattleman's Association, an affiliate of the Pennsylvania Cattleman's Association Inc. The group will hold its first meeting at 6:30 tonight at Hoss's Steak House in Lionville.
LIVING
January 29, 1996 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The youngsters in London's Holland Park School cafeteria can get practically anything they want for lunch: pork sausage rolls, lamb shepherd's pie, tuna sandwiches, vegetarian chili, hot pudding with custard - even that ghastly old British favorite, french fries smothered with baked beans. But not beef. As Britain confronts its worst food scare in years, Holland Park, like thousands of other schools throughout the United Kingdom, has stopped serving all beef products, from hamburgers to steak-and-kidney pie. The problem is a deadly bovine illness called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
FOOD
March 13, 2008
Prime beef is the highest-quality, tenderest, most richly marbled meat from a small percentage of cattle. Ultimately, about 2 percent of American beef makes the cut and is stamped USDA Prime. Most prime meat goes to high-end restaurants. Only a few retail sources, mostly in major cities - Philadelphia included - and online/mail-order sources sell prime beef to the public. Many butchers will custom-order it. Prime beef and branded products of near-prime quality are available at Wegmans and Whole Foods markets.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 9, 2013
By Erica Meier Headlines around the world have blared the scandal: Unwitting Britons who dined on hamburgers, meatballs, or other beef products were actually eating horse meat - and they're outraged. In fact, recent polls show that 20 percent of U.K. consumers are now eating less meat and 7 percent are saying "neigh" to meat altogether. In Philadelphia, the news seems to have had the opposite effect: At least one restaurant says it plans to add horse meat to its menu. The scandal raises many uncomfortable questions.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
Wash. candidate on 'the rape thing' OLYMPIA, Wash. - A Republican congressional candidate says abortion should not be legal, even when it involves "the rape thing," according to audio provided Wednesday to the Associated Press. An activist working on behalf of the liberal group FUSE Washington asked questions of Republican hopeful John Koster during a Sunday fund-raiser. Koster said he did not oppose abortion when the life of the mother was in danger, then explained he would oppose it when it involved rape or incest.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
Lax testing of food quality in school cafeterias is giving troubling new meaning to the term "mystery meat. " Congress is making a welcome push for higher food-testing standards following reports from government investigators and newspapers that shone a light on glaring gaps in safety standards. That comes in the face of numerous challenges to improving the food-safety system in general, as millions of people are sickened and 5,000 die annually from food-borne illnesses. Tracking the source of food contamination remains a major concern, as well as the efficiency of enacting recalls.
FOOD
March 13, 2008
Prime beef is the highest-quality, tenderest, most richly marbled meat from a small percentage of cattle. Ultimately, about 2 percent of American beef makes the cut and is stamped USDA Prime. Most prime meat goes to high-end restaurants. Only a few retail sources, mostly in major cities - Philadelphia included - and online/mail-order sources sell prime beef to the public. Many butchers will custom-order it. Prime beef and branded products of near-prime quality are available at Wegmans and Whole Foods markets.
NEWS
February 21, 2008 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia parents' group sharply criticized the city school district and the USDA yesterday for not acting earlier to recall possibly tainted beef served to children in school cafeterias. An alert went out Tuesday to 196 school districts from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, advising them to remove most beef products from the schools. The beef may have originated at a California meat packing plant that slaughtered "downer" cattle and distributed the meat through the the USDA's School Lunch Program, state officials said.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
More than 190 Pennsylvania school districts, including at least 19 in the Philadelphia area, received beef products from a California plant that issued a nationwide recall this week. State Agriculture Secretary Dennis Wolff said that while the health risk was low, the agency had told districts to dispose of any remaining beef. Because the recall affects products dating to 2006, most of the 126,000 pounds of beef shipped to Pennsylvania schools has likely been eaten. But thousands of pounds remain in school freezers, state officials said.
NEWS
January 6, 2004 | Steven Milloy
Steven Milloy is is an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute The "mad cow" disease diagnosed in a U.S. cow has set off a new round of predictable, but groundless, panic. Foreign governments promptly banned imports of U.S. beef. Investors dumped the stocks of beef-related companies. And, of course, what health scare would be complete without hyperventilating calls for even more government oversight of an already highly regulated industry? Bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE - commonly called mad cow disease - is a neurological disease in cattle.
NEWS
May 25, 2003
How many sick cows does it take to bring an industry to its knees? Just one, if the malady is bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad cow disease. In a matter of days, the discovery of a mad cow in Canada last week brought instant devastation to that country's $2.9 billion beef export industry. The United States - Canada's biggest beef customer - joined Australia, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea in temporarily banning all Canadian beef products, even dog food.
LIVING
January 29, 1996 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The youngsters in London's Holland Park School cafeteria can get practically anything they want for lunch: pork sausage rolls, lamb shepherd's pie, tuna sandwiches, vegetarian chili, hot pudding with custard - even that ghastly old British favorite, french fries smothered with baked beans. But not beef. As Britain confronts its worst food scare in years, Holland Park, like thousands of other schools throughout the United Kingdom, has stopped serving all beef products, from hamburgers to steak-and-kidney pie. The problem is a deadly bovine illness called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chester County may be known for its dairy farms, but cattle ranches? While this may not be the wide open ranges of Texas, the beef industry is on the upswing in the county. "A lot of the farms in Chester County that were dairy farms have converted to the beef industry, whether people are doing it as a hobby or a full-time job," said Gary Smith, steering committee chairman for the recently formed Southeast Regional Cattleman's Association, an affiliate of the Pennsylvania Cattleman's Association Inc. The group will hold its first meeting at 6:30 tonight at Hoss's Steak House in Lionville.
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