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NEWS
January 2, 2004 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Giant slabs of prime rib, cheese-drizzled steak sandwiches, juicy burgers - Philadelphians can't get enough of them. The signature dish at the Prime Rib restaurant in Center City, a 30-ounce slab of meat that sells for $36.95, remains its most popular item. Sales of the seven-ounce burger at the Standard Tap are sizzling. Even the veal cheeks at Monk's Cafe retain their devoted following. Mad cow, schmad cow. Despite widespread concerns over U.S. beef after the Dec. 23 announcement that a Washington state dairy cow had the disease, local beef-eaters aren't going cold turkey.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Barbara Shelly
To the legion of Americans running away from a hamburger additive as fast as a startled Angus, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is here to tell you: "It's beef, dude. " Technically, he's right. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's official definition of beef for marketing purposes is "flesh of cattle. " And the product officially known as "lean, finely textured beef," and now infamously known as "pink slime," does originate with a cow. But, dude, we're talking about salvaged scraps, simmered at low heat and spun at high speed to remove the fat, then spritzed with ammonia to kill bacteria.
FOOD
April 4, 2001 | by Jenice M. Armstrong Daily News Staff Writer
It's easy to find a bad veggie burger. They're often mushy, bland and downright disgusting. But before you give up on them altogether, check out the ones at Basic 4 Vegetarian Snack Bar. Each morning, the tiny stand inside the Reading Terminal Market makes its burgers from scratch, mixing large metal pots of crumbled tofu and bits of vegetables, then grilling them on a skillet. Then workers slather on a creamy dressing made from tofu-style mayonnaise, and pile onions, tomatoes, lettuce and cheese onto a whole-wheat roll or a wheat pita.
FOOD
December 24, 1986 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Two of Philadelphia's oldest and best-known restaurants - Arthur's, a classic steakhouse since 1932, and Frankie Bradley's, a Jewish-style restaurant that had featured steaks since 1937 - closed this year. With those closings came speculation that the end of the steakhouse as an institution was near, that changing American tastes had fatally eroded the demand for the big beef dinner. Balderdash, say people in the business. "I would find it hard to pin either closing on changing eating habits," says Alphonse Pignataro, director of the Center City Proprietors' Association and a former restaurant owner.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | by Sono Motoyama, Daily News Staff Writer
Maybe it's because I'm a girl, but I just don't get the steakhouse thing. Why would anyone need to eat a bleeding piece of flesh as big as a soccer ball - and in an uninspired chain-restaurant setting? It's not romantic, it's not challenging to the tastebuds and it's certainly not healthy. So in fairness to Smith & Wollensky, the New York enterprise that recently set up shop in the Rittenhouse Hotel, I am not their ideal customer. I found out who their customer was last week, when I strolled in, mid-Republican National Convention, with my friend Howard: men with expense accounts.
SPORTS
April 18, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
The Kansas City Chiefs' defense, already one of the better ones in the NFL, added a new centerpiece yesterday when Oakland declined to match the offer sheet to nose tackle Chester McGlockton. A day before signing the sometimes underachieving 320-pounder, the Chiefs signed former Pro Bowl defensive end Leslie O'Neal, one of the NFL's finest pass rushers during an 11-year career with San Diego and St. Louis. McGlockton, who has 39 1/2 career sacks, signed his offer sheet Thursday night just minutes before the 10:59 p.m. deadline, bolstering a unit which already featured nine-time All Pro linebacker Derrick Thomas and allowed the fewest points in the NFL last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2004 | By JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
WITH THE RECENT mad cow disease scare alarming not only America but inducing a panic of global proportions regarding the consumption of beef, many burger lovers and red-meat aficionados seem to be in a quandary. Indeed, these people have found themselves stuck with three unappealing options - continue eating beef and risk mad cow disease, eat the much less satisfying substitutes like turkey burgers and tofu hot dogs, or stop eating meat products. Until now. The buffalo are here!
FOOD
May 24, 1995 | by Phyllis Stein-Novack, Special to the Daily News
I used to think America had become a white-wine-and-fish country. Now I know better. Within the past year, Americans ate more beef than pork, chicken, fish, lamb, veal or pasta. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, Americans downed more steaks, burgers and pot roast than Fettucine Alfredo or sauteed salmon. And what did they drink with a grilled filet mignon? Red wine. Although the media have touted beef as a cholesterol-raising bad guy in recent years, we remain a nation of meat and potato eaters.
FOOD
October 9, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
What is the life-expectancy of steakhouses in a decade that appears to be saying thumbs-down on red meat? Doctors and health organizations are saying beef is bad for you, especially prime beef, which is loaded with fat. And the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is already forecasting that we're going to eat less red meat in 1989 and that we'll be buying more chicken instead. The bad news for the health groups trying to change eating habits is that the government forecast and the fact that people are eating less red meat appear to have little, if anything, to do with health concerns.
FOOD
February 23, 1994 | By Sharon MacKenzie, FOR THE INQUIRER
If there is anything good about winter - this particular, terrible winter - it is that hot, hearty food, cooked slowly and smelling wonderful, provides a feeling of warm comfort. Simple roast beef, in its own spicy sauce, is the centerpiece of our current seasonal menu, and it is complemented by basic, nutritious dishes that round out this four-person repast. All shopping can be done in local supermarkets, at a bargain price of less than $13, and preparation is as painless as the cost.
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