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NEWS
August 17, 2004
IFIND IT REALLY sad that there are some people who are basing there decision of who to vote for on who they would rather have a beer with. If W. is re-elected, chances are he'll be drinking alone. Those of us in the lower and middle class probably won't be able to afford to buy a beer. People need to wake up and vote on the issues. Gore was a bore, but he wouldn't have made most of the country poor. Now is the time to atone for that mess of an election in 2000. Don't leave it to the conservative Supreme Court to "reappoint" W. Let's elect John Kerry and take our country back.
FOOD
October 21, 1987 | Special to the Daily News
Beer is no longer the cloth coat of beverages, once associated with fast food and cheap dates, acceptable only at the beach, on the foul line, or in front of the television, according to Hal Rubenstein in Elle magazine. Beer has become as fashionable as high-topped sneakers. Currently, the most popular new beer in California is a light, spicy Mexican beer called Corona. What is unique about Corona, however, is how it often is served - with a wedge of lime pushed down the neck of the bottle.
FOOD
March 12, 2009
Beer bonbons Beer and chocolate have long been classic companions. But they can now be savored in the same sweet gulp with this exquisite six-pack of brew-infused truffles from Christopher Curtin of West Chester's Éclat Chocolate. Crafted as a limited edition fundraiser for Philly Beer Week, Curtin tapped six outstanding local beers to flavor these confections. I especially liked the bright smack of Victory's Hop Wallop, the dark richness of Stoudt's Fat Dog imperial stout, and the fruity pucker of Iron Hill's Belgian-style cassis sour ale.   A pretty pilsner Sip your beer in style with this hand-blown Pilsner-style glassware from Simon Pearce.
NEWS
July 19, 2006 | By HUNG NGO
THE Daily News editorial "Wrong Cure for Stop-n-Gos" (July 6) correctly indicates that the beer-to-go permit process violated the due process rights of storeowners because City Council commingled legislative and prosecutorial functions. But the editorial rationalizes Council's actions by using these businesses as scapegoats for many of the problems in the city. So it's necessary to provide the other side of the story. Your editorial states that granting a state liquor license to a store depends on Council's acceptance of a beer-to-go permit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sidled up against the polished cherry-wood bar, watching the bartender tip a tall, slender glass at a perfect 45-degree angle beneath the shiny brass spigot, creating just the right frothy head on the amber ale I had ordered, an image flashed through my head: Boy, had my beer-drinking come a long way since the days I sat with my college friends on a park bench in the median on Broadway, passing around a bottle of Colt 45 hidden in a paper bag. ...
NEWS
November 27, 2006
GRATITUDE TO Harrisburg lawmakers reaching their long arms into the way the city does business is not something we welcome every day. In fact, the messages we send are usually the opposite: Whether it's the takeover of the city Parking Authority or Harrisburg's attempts to Big Foot our zoning authority over casinos, our usual message is "Go away. " But we're grateful for the new state law that puts some sense back into the process of issuing stop-n-go beer takeout licenses.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | By Tom Halligan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It definitely wasn't Miller Time in Yeadon Thursday night. Upset with a growing problem of teenage drinking, about 30 residents packed Borough Hall, wanting reassurance from council members that they and police would monitor the sale of beer at a deli on Church Lane. The residents are concerned about the proposed expansion of Span's Deli, at 706 Church Lane, into a convenience store with added seating for patrons. Although the deli has sold beer for about 15 years, residents said the expansion would add to an underage drinking problem in the neighborhood.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Phillies fans - well-known for their ability to boo losers - get a chance to bellow loud and clear about the food and drink lineup at Veterans Stadium. A City Council committee holds a public hearing today to hear fans' opinion of the ballpark grub. The lead witness is Joe Sixpack, the People Paper's voice of the beer-drinking public. Councilman Jim Kenney organized the hearing after the Daily News exposed the half-million-dollar suds-skimming scam perpetrated by the Vet's concessionaire.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Martha Warburton of Middletown said she was disappointed. Not angry or vindictive, just disappointed. She and her husband, William, had appealed to Judge Melvin G. Levy in Delaware County Court Monday to hand down a jail sentence for James Bewley, 25, for buying beer for four teenagers, including their 17-year-old daughter Heather, on the night of Aug. 9, 1988. Heather was killed later that night in an auto accident related to the teen drinking. Levy listened attentively to the Warburtons' impassioned plea and, after noting that Bewley, of the 300 block of South Providence Road, Nether Providence, had no record, sentenced him to three years' probation and a $750 fine.
FOOD
November 16, 1994 | by Teresa Banik, Special to the Daily News
"Sometimes the best wine for Thanksgiving is a beer," says Lynn Hoffman, professor of food and wine at Drexel University and a fan of good beer. "There are a lot of big, loud flavors at Thanksgiving, and not everybody likes wine enough to have a big, loud wine to go along with it. There are a lot of people who are just uncomfortable with the idea of wine. It not their family beverage. They don't drink wine . . . and Thanksgiving is not the time to educate them. " Hoffman proposes either a light-flavored beer to cut through the intense flavors of the meal and refresh your mouth, or a more intense beer that will stand its ground next to the richest stuffing you can put on the table.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 15, 2015
In the last two years, the number of breweries in New Jersey has more than tripled. Good luck finding their beer down the Shore. That's because quantity, not quality, is still the key to beach-town beer consumption. The raucous, rocking bars of Wildwood, Sea Isle City, and elsewhere along Ocean Drive are all about Stoli Razberi drinks and buckets of fizzy yellow liquid. Yes, you'll spot an occasional local beer mixed in among the taps. But a true craft-beer bar down the Shore is as rare as a seagull without an attitude.
NEWS
May 8, 2015
YOU AND I walk through the woods and we see trees and bushes and thorny things. Tess Hooper, a young environmental educator at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, in Upper Roxborough, sees the makings of a fine beer. "This is a staghorn sumac," she said, nodding toward the kind of tree I've seen sprout dozens of times on vacant lots. "It bears these red cones that are like fruit. You could make beer with them. " Hmm . . . I must've missed that merit badge in Boy Scouts.
FOOD
April 24, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
The Franzone family of Bridgeport and Conshohocken has made it to the third generation in the pizza business, as Charles Franzone III opened a branch of Franzone's Pizzeria at 114 Levering St. in Manayunk (215-508-1050). It's the same deal - thin-crust pies, sweet sauce applied in a spiral - as the original founded by his grandfather in 1955. Unlike most other quickie spots in Manayunk, Franzone's closes at midnight - the building's historical certification does not allow later hours.
NEWS
April 24, 2015
LAST WEEK'S column focused on beer travel overseas. Of course, you don't have to go that far this summer. Right here in the good ol' U S of A, there are plenty of beer-centric travel destinations. Indeed, regional tourism agencies have set up easy-to-follow travel guides from New England to Southern California. These ale trails are more than just your usual beer-soaked pub crawl. They're an opportunity to see America and meet the people behind the nation's still growing small brewery scene.
NEWS
April 17, 2015
THIS IS my year for beer travel, with group tours planned to Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Austria, as well as several Eastern U.S. destinations. I got things started earlier this month by leading about 150 beer lovers on a very cool river cruise to the Netherlands and Belgium. Eight breweries, two lectures, a beer dinner and many onboard bottle-shares later, and I'm left with exactly what I look for in travel: a sense of surprise. Here are a few discoveries that caught me off guard.
SPORTS
April 15, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
DUMB AND DUMBER were at the Mets' home opener against the Phillies yesterday. Bottom of the fourth. One out. Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy hits a double deep to rightfield. The Phillies' Grady Sizemore chases it down when two idiots, sitting field level in the first row behind a chain-link fence, try to douse the outfielder with beer. Idiot No. 1 was clearly visible on the television feed. Wearing a Mets jersey, he propelled the liquid from his cup with a feeble underhanded motion.
NEWS
April 10, 2015
WOULD YOU enjoy drinking beer as much if it didn't give you a buzz? Those bitter hops, that toasty malt - do we really need the alcohol to enjoy the flavor of a glass of ale? It turns out, yes, we do. In his new, utterly fascinating book, Tasty: The Art and Science of What We Eat (Scribner), Pulitzer Prize-winning author John McQuaid writes that ethanol - itself essentially flavorless - changes and improves the very chemistry of flavor. First, the process of fermentation produces a host of byproducts that, although not themselves alcoholic, have flavors that are both "complex and provocative.
NEWS
March 27, 2015
UNDER a leaky roof in a tired corner of Camden, there's a single barrel of whiskey quietly aging and mellowing toward what might be the next frontier for American craft beer. It's marked "IPA-skey. " James Yoakum, the owner at Cooper River Distilling, pulled a sample for me the other day and handed it over. It was smooth and a bit smoky, with the delicate yet unmistakable bitterness of hops. The spirits began life as a batch of India pale ale from North Philly's Saint Benjamin Brewing.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY MARNIE OLD & DON RUSSELL & GAR JOSEPH, For the Daily News Daily News Staff Writer
Editor's note: Beer or wine? We posed that question to Don Russell, whose "Joe Sixpack" beer column appears weekly here, and Marnie Old, a local sommelier and wine author who writes the "Cheap Buzz" column in the Daily News with Assistant Managing Editor Gar "Buzz" Joseph. With Buzz as referee, let the games begin. B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, I read that you're going to debate Pennsylvania beer vs. Pennsylvania wine on Tuesday at World Cafe Live. Marnie: Yes, it's a "people's choice" dinner during Philly Wine Week to determine which drink is the best food partner, loosely based on my first book, He Said Beer, She Said Wine . Buzz: How's it work?
NEWS
March 13, 2015
YIPPEE! Pennsylvania beer drinkers can finally buy 12-packs at distributors, thanks to a ruling last week from our pals at the Liquor Control Board. Well, yes . . . but before you start celebrating, there are good reasons to be worried. *  Unelected bureaucrats are rewriting the rules. The LCB calls its 12-pack opinion an "interpretation" of the existing law. But that's just lawyerspeak for "we finally found a way to make this happen. " For the past 80 years, Pennsylvania has been living under a fairly iron set of bizarre rules.
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