FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 17, 2004
IFIND IT REALLY sad that there are some people who are basing there decision of who to vote for on who they would rather have a beer with. If W. is re-elected, chances are he'll be drinking alone. Those of us in the lower and middle class probably won't be able to afford to buy a beer. People need to wake up and vote on the issues. Gore was a bore, but he wouldn't have made most of the country poor. Now is the time to atone for that mess of an election in 2000. Don't leave it to the conservative Supreme Court to "reappoint" W. Let's elect John Kerry and take our country back.
FOOD
May 29, 2015 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
The reasons to cook with beer are as varied as the types of beer. The best reason is that beer can have so many nuanced flavors - unique to each particular brew. There will be sweetness from malted grain, bitterness from hops, and rich fruity tones from the yeasts and other ingredients that combine during the brewing process into a liquid with many possible culinary uses. Belgians have beef-and-beer stew - carbonnade flammade, which rivals the French beef and red wine classic, beef bourguignonne, full of savory meat and vegetables brought together with a sauce featuring Belgian ale to great effect.
FOOD
October 21, 1987 | Special to the Daily News
Beer is no longer the cloth coat of beverages, once associated with fast food and cheap dates, acceptable only at the beach, on the foul line, or in front of the television, according to Hal Rubenstein in Elle magazine. Beer has become as fashionable as high-topped sneakers. Currently, the most popular new beer in California is a light, spicy Mexican beer called Corona. What is unique about Corona, however, is how it often is served - with a wedge of lime pushed down the neck of the bottle.
FOOD
March 12, 2009
Beer bonbons Beer and chocolate have long been classic companions. But they can now be savored in the same sweet gulp with this exquisite six-pack of brew-infused truffles from Christopher Curtin of West Chester's Éclat Chocolate. Crafted as a limited edition fundraiser for Philly Beer Week, Curtin tapped six outstanding local beers to flavor these confections. I especially liked the bright smack of Victory's Hop Wallop, the dark richness of Stoudt's Fat Dog imperial stout, and the fruity pucker of Iron Hill's Belgian-style cassis sour ale.   A pretty pilsner Sip your beer in style with this hand-blown Pilsner-style glassware from Simon Pearce.
NEWS
July 19, 2006 | By HUNG NGO
THE Daily News editorial "Wrong Cure for Stop-n-Gos" (July 6) correctly indicates that the beer-to-go permit process violated the due process rights of storeowners because City Council commingled legislative and prosecutorial functions. But the editorial rationalizes Council's actions by using these businesses as scapegoats for many of the problems in the city. So it's necessary to provide the other side of the story. Your editorial states that granting a state liquor license to a store depends on Council's acceptance of a beer-to-go permit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sidled up against the polished cherry-wood bar, watching the bartender tip a tall, slender glass at a perfect 45-degree angle beneath the shiny brass spigot, creating just the right frothy head on the amber ale I had ordered, an image flashed through my head: Boy, had my beer-drinking come a long way since the days I sat with my college friends on a park bench in the median on Broadway, passing around a bottle of Colt 45 hidden in a paper bag. ...
NEWS
November 27, 2006
GRATITUDE TO Harrisburg lawmakers reaching their long arms into the way the city does business is not something we welcome every day. In fact, the messages we send are usually the opposite: Whether it's the takeover of the city Parking Authority or Harrisburg's attempts to Big Foot our zoning authority over casinos, our usual message is "Go away. " But we're grateful for the new state law that puts some sense back into the process of issuing stop-n-go beer takeout licenses.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | By Tom Halligan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It definitely wasn't Miller Time in Yeadon Thursday night. Upset with a growing problem of teenage drinking, about 30 residents packed Borough Hall, wanting reassurance from council members that they and police would monitor the sale of beer at a deli on Church Lane. The residents are concerned about the proposed expansion of Span's Deli, at 706 Church Lane, into a convenience store with added seating for patrons. Although the deli has sold beer for about 15 years, residents said the expansion would add to an underage drinking problem in the neighborhood.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Phillies fans - well-known for their ability to boo losers - get a chance to bellow loud and clear about the food and drink lineup at Veterans Stadium. A City Council committee holds a public hearing today to hear fans' opinion of the ballpark grub. The lead witness is Joe Sixpack, the People Paper's voice of the beer-drinking public. Councilman Jim Kenney organized the hearing after the Daily News exposed the half-million-dollar suds-skimming scam perpetrated by the Vet's concessionaire.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Martha Warburton of Middletown said she was disappointed. Not angry or vindictive, just disappointed. She and her husband, William, had appealed to Judge Melvin G. Levy in Delaware County Court Monday to hand down a jail sentence for James Bewley, 25, for buying beer for four teenagers, including their 17-year-old daughter Heather, on the night of Aug. 9, 1988. Heather was killed later that night in an auto accident related to the teen drinking. Levy listened attentively to the Warburtons' impassioned plea and, after noting that Bewley, of the 300 block of South Providence Road, Nether Providence, had no record, sentenced him to three years' probation and a $750 fine.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2015
ANYONE who thinks that Philadelphia's beer scene ends at the Schuylkill River needs to take Regional Rail to Norristown, hop onto the Rt. 99 bus for an hour or so, get off in Phoenixville, curse SEPTA and start walking. This once-stinky Chester County town has transformed its dinky downtown alongside an abandoned steel mill into a lively restaurant and nightlife destination. In just three blocks along its main shopping corridor, Bridge Street, there are two brewpubs, a pair of winery outlets and a distillery.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
GRAB A PENCIL, crack open a cold one and test your beer knowledge. 1. Which one of these TV shows does not have its own official beer? a. Game of Thrones. b. The Walking Dead c. The Simpsons d. The GOP presidential debates e. It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia 2. Which of the following is not an Anheuser-Busch brand? a. Loser Pale Ale b. Swill Beer c. Toxic Sludge d. Beck's e. None of the above 3. What is the beer that a Latin-owned Chicago brewery named as a tribute to Donald Trump after his anti-Mexican speech?
FOOD
August 7, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Beer geek and reformed lawyer Kristen Cevoli and business partner Jon Shinners unlocked the door on BeerLOVE , their bottle shop/tasting room at 714 S. Fourth St. in Queen Village. The storefront, across from Essene market and down the block from Famous 4th Street Deli, is stocked with about 500 beers, plus a sizable list of large-format beers. They also have eight taps dispensing many one-offs. Customers can sample flights, get a full pour, or fill a growler. Food is basically packaged bar snacks, including popcorn, plaintain chips, jerky, pickles, s'mores.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beer lovers and Wawa fanatics are one step closer to being able to carry out six-packs of beer with their hoagies and groceries from one Delaware County store. At a meeting Tuesday, the Concord Township Board of Supervisors announced its approval of Wawa Inc.'s request to sell beer at its store on Naamans Creek Road in Chadds Ford. The decision does not mean shoppers can start flocking to the store for brews. Wawa still needs approval from the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Weeks of suspense have attended convenience-store giant Wawa's request to sell beer at a Delaware County location. On Tuesday, the Concord Township Board of Supervisors decided that the suspense would last at least two more weeks. Just hours before a verdict was due Tuesday, the township announced that no decision would be on tap before the supervisors convene Aug. 4. Their decision will determine whether Wawa, one of the region's most popular convenience chains, can elbow its way into a beer market long dominated by distributors selling larger quantities.
NEWS
July 21, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kim Ladig is as loyal as Wawa customers come: The Garnet Valley resident visits her local Chadds Ford store two to three times a day. "For coffee, a sandwich, gas, I'm really here all the time," Ladig said Friday, hands full of groceries, her two children at her side. "They've got it all. " Almost. This week, Wawa, one of the region's most revered convenience stores, could take the first step toward adding yet another item to the short-list for its dedicated, harried shoppers: Beer.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
MY BAR TALK podcast partner, Glen Macnow, and I got to yapping about my suggestion of a couple of weeks ago for a Philly beer museum. The WIP sports talker came up with even better idea: A Beer Hall of Fame. To get things started, here are my nominees for the first class. You can vote for your favorites or add your own nominees at www.joesixpack.net . The Inventors *  Louis Pasteur. In 1858, the French chemist discovered that heat kills the bacteria that turns beer sour.
NEWS
July 12, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of a pop-up beer garden in Point Breeze won a court order against the city Friday when a judge ruled that he could reopen while fighting a zoning dispute that shut down the venue the day before. John Longacre said he would reopen his nascent beer garden on Saturday. "I couldn't believe it," Longacre said minutes after emerging from a 31/2-hour hearing before Municipal Court Judge Nina Wright Padilla that began at 3 p.m. "It's a big, big deal. " Longacre said Padilla heard testimony before lifting a cease-and-desist order issued by the Department of Licenses and Inspections against the beer garden, which debuted in May on a long-vacant lot on Point Breeze Avenue near 22d and Tasker Streets.
NEWS
July 11, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pop-up beer garden in Philadelphia's Point Breeze neighborhood was shut down Thursday after city inspectors said it violated the zoning code. The cease-and-desist order from the Department of Licenses and Inspections enraged property owner John Longacre and left Councilman Kenyatta Johnson wondering what could be done to reopen what one aide said was a well-received newcomer on a long-vacant lot at 22d and Tasker Streets. The lot is zoned residential. L&I said a seasonal outpost for serving beer, an increasingly popular concept across the city, was prohibited under such zoning.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News
LAST WEEK, The New York Times tackled the quandary of outdoor wine drinking. Specifically: How does one enjoy a fine vintage on a picnic without the proper glassware? Indeed. For starters, everyone knows it's impossible to balance a crystal Champagne flute on a cashmere blanket. Never mind those pesky bugs swarming that 2005 magnum of Saint Emilion Grand Cru. But the big question on the south lawn at the summer estate is: Cabernet goblets or claret chalices? Oh, pooh! The servants simply cannot be trusted with the Waterford decanter - not after that disastrous outing in the Hamptons when Jeeves nearly knocked it over with a croquet mallet.
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