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Beer Belly

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FOOD
April 29, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
"America's Funniest Home Videos" - the TV show that screens embarrassing amateur videotapes - has come up with its own "scientific theory" to explain its most common contribution: Dad losing his pants while "doin' the hokey pokey" at his daughter's wedding. It's the "belt buckle" theory: If Dad's belt buckle points down to the floor, the pants are precarious. There's a reason that a pendulous paunch is known as a "beer belly. " The latest research on the topic, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that excess alcohol consumption (over the body's need for calories)
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, Jay Lamont was looking for rock bands to book in his Somers Point, N.J., restaurant this summer. He stopped in Uncle Mike's Country Pine Inn in nearby May's Landing. It was about 11 p.m. The place was wall-to-wall people. It's a beer and shots place with a pool table. About seven motorcycles are parked outside. Lamont's friends wended their way through the crowd heading for the band, Van Gogh's Ear. Lamont, a real-estate columnist for the Daily News, followed.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
GUT ISSUE You're more likely to get an "ice cream belly" than a "beer belly. " In fact, Richard Cook, director of the University of Maine's School of Human Development, says he has noticed a good number of "potato bellies. " Extra calories don't have to come from beer and don't have to end up at the waistline, he says in Men's Health magazine. Genes determine where the flab winds up - "it could just as easily be on the legs or the hips," Cook says. Every body has its own favorite places.
NEWS
June 23, 2006 | By Jane Stojak
Recently, I was one of 10 judges at the Philadelphia Eagles' national anthem open-call auditions. Four hundred hopefuls showed up on a cold, damp Sunday to compete for three slots to sing at an Eagles game next season. It was just what I expected - a normal distribution of singing talent. There was a handful of American Idol winner material. There were lovely voices that would be great at a family holiday celebration. Some were completely tone-deaf. Many lowered the key when they got to "And the rockets red glare.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1987 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
"Confessions of an Irish Rebel," a one-man drama based on the works of Brendan Behan. Written, adapted by and starring Shay Duffin. Presented by Barnard Sackett at his On Stage! Theatre, 2020 Sansom St., through April 19. "Confessions of an Irish Rebel" - Shay Duffin's one-man show based on the life and writings of the alcoholic Irish wild man, Brendan Behan - is billed as a farewell tour. Following a five-week run at the intimate On Stage! Theatre, 2020 Sansom St., Duffin says he will retire the character he's portrayed for the past 10 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Good news for sweater-lovers: Retailers, in their rush to keep men shopping, are stocking up on the knit staples. "It's the one thing men always feel comfortable in," said Tom Longo, owner of the Metro Men's Clothing boutique in South Philadelphia. "Not to mention, sweaters are one of the few items they can wear out and to work. " Trends this cold-weather season are all about the classics meeting the eclectic. Pullover sweaters with deep V-necks and leather patches on the elbows are really in. Shawl-neck cardigans - yes, like Mr. Rogers - are also hot for guys, as is the cozy fisherman look.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Golden, amber or dark. Ale, stout or porter. Pour 'em and Micheal Jackson will down 'em. And this ain't no Pabst Blue Ribbon drinker, here. We're talkin' author of "The New World Guide to Beer. " We're talkin' host of "The Beer Hunter. " We're talkin' Exalted Brewmeister Supremo. Instead of waiting for Jackson to lecture to crowds at last Saturday's "Homage to Beer" at the University of Pennsylvania, we decided to study the man in his element. We dragged the Briton from all those snooty Book and the Cook happenings onto a Philadelphia pub crawl, which included a couple of brewery pubs, a neighborhood bar and a hep local eatery.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Here's the last of my latest series of readers' gripes. I hope your spleens feel thoroughly vented. "My gripe is my husband. Married 40 years and he's been a creep. Never a pleasant day. One of these days he better watch out. Please print this. Maybe he will change, although I have no hope for him. " "David Letterman. I don't laugh at any of his jokes. But he laughs at them hard enough for both of us. " "What about the guy carrying a 200-pound beer belly, wears a short T-shirt and scratches the bottom of his fat belly after stuffing himself at an all- you-can-eat restaurant.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | BY ELMER SMITH
I think Anne and Mavis, the nurses in our dispensary, really want to believe. But they have trouble keeping the faith. "How'd you do?" Mavis asks hopefully when I step from the scale. "Gee, I don't understand that," she'll say when she hears the bad news. "My weight hasn't changed in 30 years. " Anne, who is as tall and slim today as she was a schoolgirl, says she watches her weight. "I weigh myself weekly," she once confided. "If I gain a pound, I lose it right away," Of course, they are effusive in their encouragement and generous with their compassion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
If it weren't for those pesky plots, the job of writing musicals would be a whole lot easier. There's a good reason, after all, that musicals tend to be considerably livelier in their first acts: It's much simpler, and much more fun, to set things in motion than to laboriously gather the strands thus unspooled and wrap them all up. Even some of the best musicals have second-act problems; for confirmation, check out Fiddler on the Roof. Or, on a less rarefied level, check out The Full Monty, a musicalization of the hit British movie, which opened Thursday at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Good news for sweater-lovers: Retailers, in their rush to keep men shopping, are stocking up on the knit staples. "It's the one thing men always feel comfortable in," said Tom Longo, owner of the Metro Men's Clothing boutique in South Philadelphia. "Not to mention, sweaters are one of the few items they can wear out and to work. " Trends this cold-weather season are all about the classics meeting the eclectic. Pullover sweaters with deep V-necks and leather patches on the elbows are really in. Shawl-neck cardigans - yes, like Mr. Rogers - are also hot for guys, as is the cozy fisherman look.
NEWS
June 23, 2006 | By Jane Stojak
Recently, I was one of 10 judges at the Philadelphia Eagles' national anthem open-call auditions. Four hundred hopefuls showed up on a cold, damp Sunday to compete for three slots to sing at an Eagles game next season. It was just what I expected - a normal distribution of singing talent. There was a handful of American Idol winner material. There were lovely voices that would be great at a family holiday celebration. Some were completely tone-deaf. Many lowered the key when they got to "And the rockets red glare.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2000 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
If it weren't for those pesky plots, the job of writing musicals would be a whole lot easier. There's a good reason, after all, that musicals tend to be considerably livelier in their first acts: It's much simpler, and much more fun, to set things in motion than to laboriously gather the strands thus unspooled and wrap them all up. Even some of the best musicals have second-act problems; for confirmation, check out Fiddler on the Roof. Or, on a less rarefied level, check out The Full Monty, a musicalization of the hit British movie, which opened Thursday at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Two weeks ago, Jay Lamont was looking for rock bands to book in his Somers Point, N.J., restaurant this summer. He stopped in Uncle Mike's Country Pine Inn in nearby May's Landing. It was about 11 p.m. The place was wall-to-wall people. It's a beer and shots place with a pool table. About seven motorcycles are parked outside. Lamont's friends wended their way through the crowd heading for the band, Van Gogh's Ear. Lamont, a real-estate columnist for the Daily News, followed.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
George H. Feulner Jr., who showed others courage of how to live in this world and the grace of leaving for the next, died Sunday of cancer. He was 25 and lived in Fishtown. George Feulner had to fight a bit harder than most kids coming up in Fishtown. He had a learning disability but he pushed his way through technical and trade schools to get a diploma from Kensington High School. At the Swenson Skill Center he met Stacy Ann Kilbride and they clicked right away. George was full of fun and loved to tease and Stacy was his match.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Here's the last of my latest series of readers' gripes. I hope your spleens feel thoroughly vented. "My gripe is my husband. Married 40 years and he's been a creep. Never a pleasant day. One of these days he better watch out. Please print this. Maybe he will change, although I have no hope for him. " "David Letterman. I don't laugh at any of his jokes. But he laughs at them hard enough for both of us. " "What about the guy carrying a 200-pound beer belly, wears a short T-shirt and scratches the bottom of his fat belly after stuffing himself at an all- you-can-eat restaurant.
FOOD
April 29, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
"America's Funniest Home Videos" - the TV show that screens embarrassing amateur videotapes - has come up with its own "scientific theory" to explain its most common contribution: Dad losing his pants while "doin' the hokey pokey" at his daughter's wedding. It's the "belt buckle" theory: If Dad's belt buckle points down to the floor, the pants are precarious. There's a reason that a pendulous paunch is known as a "beer belly. " The latest research on the topic, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that excess alcohol consumption (over the body's need for calories)
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | BY ELMER SMITH
I think Anne and Mavis, the nurses in our dispensary, really want to believe. But they have trouble keeping the faith. "How'd you do?" Mavis asks hopefully when I step from the scale. "Gee, I don't understand that," she'll say when she hears the bad news. "My weight hasn't changed in 30 years. " Anne, who is as tall and slim today as she was a schoolgirl, says she watches her weight. "I weigh myself weekly," she once confided. "If I gain a pound, I lose it right away," Of course, they are effusive in their encouragement and generous with their compassion.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Golden, amber or dark. Ale, stout or porter. Pour 'em and Micheal Jackson will down 'em. And this ain't no Pabst Blue Ribbon drinker, here. We're talkin' author of "The New World Guide to Beer. " We're talkin' host of "The Beer Hunter. " We're talkin' Exalted Brewmeister Supremo. Instead of waiting for Jackson to lecture to crowds at last Saturday's "Homage to Beer" at the University of Pennsylvania, we decided to study the man in his element. We dragged the Briton from all those snooty Book and the Cook happenings onto a Philadelphia pub crawl, which included a couple of brewery pubs, a neighborhood bar and a hep local eatery.
NEWS
November 5, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
GUT ISSUE You're more likely to get an "ice cream belly" than a "beer belly. " In fact, Richard Cook, director of the University of Maine's School of Human Development, says he has noticed a good number of "potato bellies. " Extra calories don't have to come from beer and don't have to end up at the waistline, he says in Men's Health magazine. Genes determine where the flab winds up - "it could just as easily be on the legs or the hips," Cook says. Every body has its own favorite places.
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