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Beer Store

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NEWS
February 9, 2003 | By Gene D'Alessandro FOR THE INQUIRER
When St. John of the Cross parish was founded in 1953, parishioners waited nearly two years for a permanent place to worship. To bide its time, the fledgling Catholic parish held services in a very secular locale - a local beer distributor. The Easton Road storefront became a makeshift chapel - with pews, folding chairs and an altar - for the 100 or so congregants. "In those days, you had to build a school first because the church was in the auditorium," said first-generation parishioner Anne Smith, 80, who remembers attending Mass at the "beer store" while awaiting construction of the school building.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5907
KEVIN SMITH served two tours with the Marines in Iraq. After he came back home, he didn't expect to see another gun pointed at him. Especially not in a trendy coffee shop in South Philly. Smith, a barista at Ultimo Coffee, on 15th Street near Mifflin, came face to face with an armed robber late Jan. 18. "I heard a noise behind me and turned to look at [the robber] pointing a gun at me, and it took me a second to register what was going on," Smith, 30, told the Daily News yesterday.
NEWS
September 21, 2005 | By ELMER SMITH
THE PROTESTERS stopped updating a wooden board in front of a closed takeout beer store at 55th and Larchwood when the protest reached 995 days. Dozens of neighbors who took turns walking the picket line and keeping the store closed for three years have reduced their vigil to an on-call protest that gets activated only when there is movement in the store. But if the owners of the nearly vacant store thought the vigil would eventually stop-n-go away, they couldn't be more wrong.
NEWS
February 22, 2002
WHEN THE economy was booming, we couldn't cut the wage and business taxes faster because, according to the politicians, "we needed the money. " Now that the economy is slowing, we can't cut them because - you guessed it -we need the money. If we can't cut taxes when we're growing, and we can't cut them in a recession, when should we expect tax cuts? Jonathan Goldstein, Philadelphia City Council, here are a few suggestions from a taxpayer that just might bring you some respect from your contituents: Start buying your own cars, you make too much not to. Stop acting like royalty.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Here are tasting notes on some of my favorite Italian beers tasted recently in the Philadelphia area. Prices are retail, unless otherwise noted. Bruton Bianca , 750 ml, $19 at Pizzeria Stella (Second and Lombard) — similar to a Belgian wit, but creamier in texture due to the use of Tuscan spelt, with finely woven coriander, orange peel, and white pepper. Bruton 10 , 750 ml, $28 at a.Kitchen (135 S. 18th St.) — a big barley wine with 10 percent alcohol, but stunning lack of burn, rich with licorice, tobacco, and caramel.
NEWS
December 7, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents are finding it easier to buy flowers. They know what movie is playing at the Yeadon theater. And it's just a short trip to the 7-Eleven. Since the repaired Church Lane Bridge opened two weeks ago, traffic has been flowing through the borough's commercial district. And to the relief of business owners on Church Lane, many drivers are falling back into their shopping patterns of a year ago. Drivers had been detoured around the 10 businesses in the 500 block of Church Lane since the 65-year-old bridge that connected Yeadon and Upper Darby was closed for major improvements in October 1992.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Outside the Kensington Beer Distributorship were two carloads of gang members - backup for the extortionist inside demanding "protection" payments. "I've got the power," the young extortionist told the beer store owners. "You got to pay me month to month. " The demand: $400 a month. Unlike nearby Vietnamese businesses, partners Manny Tran, 45, and Ngu Nhan, 46, have refused to pay. Both men spent seven years in the South Vietnamese military. Tran was a military police sergeant and Nhan, a soldier.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Businessman Manuel Guss and some Nicetown residents envision his proposed Playarama as a sorely needed family fun spot in a struggling section of the city. But Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco fears it will turn into a hangout and neighborhood headache. According to Guss, Playarama would be a combination restaurant-arcade on Germantown Avenue just south of Erie Avenue, and resemble popular children's party places like Chuck E. Cheese, where youngsters munch pizza and amuse themselves with skeeball and pinball machines.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By Linda A. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
Middletown and Lower Southampton police are investigating a rash of counterfeit bill-passing that may be related to February incidents in which more than $4 million in counterfeit money was found in Lower Bucks. Lower Southampton police said several hundred dollars' worth of bogus $20 bills were used June 17 and 18 to make purchases at seven stores in the T.J. Maxx Mall at Street Road and Bustleton Pike. According to Det. Charles J. Borchick, the stores involved were Thrift Drug, The Beer Store, USA Video, Trevose Shoe Store, McCrory's 5 & 10, Foot Fads shoe store and the Hit or Miss clothing store.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Josh Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Vitale envisions a place in Lower Merion where local beer connoisseurs and novices alike can choose among craft, import, and other specialty brews when they want to take a break from the pricey beer cases or the easy Bud Light purchase. "You can get a huge selection of wines from California to France, and vodkas now come in various flavors, such as cherry or even a cake flavor," Vitale said. "The palate today seems to be leaning toward variety, so why not have a place that does that for beers?"
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5907
KEVIN SMITH served two tours with the Marines in Iraq. After he came back home, he didn't expect to see another gun pointed at him. Especially not in a trendy coffee shop in South Philly. Smith, a barista at Ultimo Coffee, on 15th Street near Mifflin, came face to face with an armed robber late Jan. 18. "I heard a noise behind me and turned to look at [the robber] pointing a gun at me, and it took me a second to register what was going on," Smith, 30, told the Daily News yesterday.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
JUST BEFORE the end of 2012, the Brewers Association, the Colorado-based organization that represents small breweries across America, issued a fatwa against poseurs in the beer world. The campaign, called "Craft vs. Crafty," sought to expose breweries that did not meet its definition of "craft" brewers: "small, independent and traditional. " Its hit list included the likes of Blue Moon and Shock Top, because they're fronts for big, bad Coors and Anheuser-Busch, respectively. Yuengling, Lion and Straub were outted because, although they're more than a century old, their use of adjunct ingredients, including corn and rice means that they're not traditional enough for the organization.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
THIS IS a great week to be a beer geek in Philadelphia. Yeah, I know, we're still licking our wounds after Philly Beer Week earlier this month. But starting today, the city hosts the geekiest of beer lovers: People who not only know that the IPA you're sipping was dry-hopped with Simcoe hops, they likely know the farm where those hops were grown, their cohumulone content and whether they were tossed into the conditioning tank by a left- or right-handed brewer. OK, I'm kidding about that last part.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
To Chris Kunda, the incredulity is as predictable as it is understandable. "We get 10 people a day who say, 'What do you mean, I have to buy a case!?' " said Kunda, owner of a King of Prussia beer business on Henderson Road, a bustling commuter strip and highway feeder in Montgomery County. For fourscore years, Pennsylvania has been an island among the states, requiring its beer "distributors" to sell beer by the case or keg or not at all. Now, that system may be confronting its most serious challenge to date.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Here are tasting notes on some of my favorite Italian beers tasted recently in the Philadelphia area. Prices are retail, unless otherwise noted. Bruton Bianca , 750 ml, $19 at Pizzeria Stella (Second and Lombard) — similar to a Belgian wit, but creamier in texture due to the use of Tuscan spelt, with finely woven coriander, orange peel, and white pepper. Bruton 10 , 750 ml, $28 at a.Kitchen (135 S. 18th St.) — a big barley wine with 10 percent alcohol, but stunning lack of burn, rich with licorice, tobacco, and caramel.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Josh Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter Vitale envisions a place in Lower Merion where local beer connoisseurs and novices alike can choose among craft, import, and other specialty brews when they want to take a break from the pricey beer cases or the easy Bud Light purchase. "You can get a huge selection of wines from California to France, and vodkas now come in various flavors, such as cherry or even a cake flavor," Vitale said. "The palate today seems to be leaning toward variety, so why not have a place that does that for beers?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2008
BEER LOVERS are the easiest recipients on your holiday gift list. Get 'em buzzed and they're happy, at least till they wake up. But, if you're looking for something they'll remember the morning after, here's a page of suggestions. Beer for a year Give the gift that keeps on giving - membership in a beer-by-mail club. Perhaps the best is the Rare Beer Club, which packages a trio of large, unusual bottles from around the world. Info: rarebeerclub.beverage bistro.com.
NEWS
May 19, 2008 | By David Shipula
As a guy who's spent his entire working life running a beer distributorship, I often ask my customers, "What's good about selling beer in convenience stores?" The answer runs something like this: "It's convenient. You can stop for gas, and get beer and cigarettes at the same time. " Now, I can't be the only person who sees a problem with making it easy to buy beer and gasoline in one convenient location. And even though I live in Luzerne County, I know that people in Philadelphia's neighborhoods already are troubled by "convenience stores" that are more than a little careless about checking IDs for underage drinking and that all too often become nuisances in otherwise peaceful residential neighborhoods.
NEWS
September 21, 2005 | By ELMER SMITH
THE PROTESTERS stopped updating a wooden board in front of a closed takeout beer store at 55th and Larchwood when the protest reached 995 days. Dozens of neighbors who took turns walking the picket line and keeping the store closed for three years have reduced their vigil to an on-call protest that gets activated only when there is movement in the store. But if the owners of the nearly vacant store thought the vigil would eventually stop-n-go away, they couldn't be more wrong.
NEWS
December 12, 2003 | By Anthony S. Twyman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Store owners who want to offer takeout beer and malt liquor would be prohibited from such sales without special permission from the city, under a bill adopted yesterday. City Council also was expected to vote on a controversial bill that would allow a Wal-Mart in Port Richmond, but held that measure for action until next Thursday. Council gave unanimous approval to Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell's bill that would restrict new beer takeout stores known as "stop-and-gos" in Center City, West, North and South Philadelphia.
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