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Beer

BUSINESS
May 12, 1987 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe's beer is back. Joseph W. Ortlieb, a member of one of Philadelphia's best-known brewing families, has returned to the business with a new beer that is now being distributed at beverage stores and taverns in Philadelphia and its Pennsylvania suburbs. It's called Trupert American Pilsner, and - hang on, Philadelphia - it's a micro beer, or one of those new, boutique brews that feature high-quality ingredients and prices to match. Ortlieb said Trupert should sell for about $16-$17 a case.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
DO YOU know the first words spoken by Native-Americans to the Pilgrims after they landed at Plymouth Rock? "Welcome Englishmen . . . I'll have a beer. " Or something to that effect, according to an account (see sidebar) of the first visit to the Pilgrims' village by an Algonquin named Samoset. The greeting comes to mind this season because it was those words that eventually led to the first Thanksgiving in America. That's right - though our nation's annual feast is traditionally washed down with wine, it actually began with beer.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | By Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
On a Southwest Philadelphia street corner that has seen its share of trouble, entrepreneurs saw opportunity. They bought a large corner property at 60th Street and Springfield Avenue and made plans for a mini-plaza featuring a self-service laundry, grocery, restaurant - and beer takeout. When neighborhood residents heard "beer," they sensed disaster, worried about an ugly past returning: They saw the threat of drug dealers again hanging out at the intersection. They saw the threat of guns.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | Joe Sixpack
HOW DOES a beer drinker navigate 10 days of nonstop suds? I asked a few pros for some tips. And by pros, I mean guys (and a gal) who are among the most die-hard beer fans I know.   All agreed a bit of planning is essential. "I actually sat down and looked through the events at phillybeerweek.org , and also made a list I heard through the hop vine," said Natalie DeChico, of Langhorne, who last year won the annual Philly Beer Geek contest. Stephen Lyford, of Bellmawr, N.J., who serves as Philly Beer Week's unofficial photographer, also checks his Facebook invites and Twitter feeds, then creates his own Google calendar.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
I remember the Ballantine scoreboard in right-center at Connie Mack Stadium. I remember Ballantine Blasts by Wes Covington and Johnny Callison. And I remember vendors with heavy cases of bottles, climbing through the steep left field bleachers yelling, "Hey getcha cold beer!" Yo, beer man! Over here! Ballantine and Wes and Johnny are gone from Philly. So too, sadly, is the noble beer vendor. They stopped selling beers in the stands at Veterans Stadium a few years ago. In an attempt to crack down on rowdyism and underage drinking, beer vendors were required to check IDs of everyone who purchased a cup. The plan failed when spectators griped about the hassle and vendors found it took twice as long to sell a rack of beers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | Joe Sixpack
You wouldn't think it would be all that hard to be a vegetarian beer drinker. I mean, I've had about a zillion different beers over the years, and I usually examine my glass pretty closely before taking a mouthful. Not once have I noticed a pork chop in there. Beer is made with water, malt, hops and yeast. And yet, here I am at Old City's Khyber Pass Pub with my colleague Vance Legume, and he's holding things up wondering if the bartender's about to pour him a beer made with, I dunno, minced kitten parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2009
HOW MANY calories are in your favorite beer? There's almost no way to know for sure. Unlike most all other food products in America, beer, wine and spirits are exempt from the federal Food & Drug Administration's nutritional labeling requirements. Those labels we squint at while grazing in the supermarket for low-fat Cheez Doodles are absent from beer packaging. "Even mom-and-pop oatmeal cookie companies have to divulge their nutritional data," author Bob Skilnik said. "Why not brewers and vintners?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dave Mela put the finishing touches on a batch of India pale ale that he had cooked on his kitchen stove the other night and recalled his introduction to home brewing. "I went to Britain about five years ago to visit my wife's family, and I went to a store, where I bought a kit for home-brew. I had never seen home- brew before. " He brought the can of malt extract back to the United States and forgot about it - just another odd souvenir. About six months later, on a whim, he brewed the batch.
NEWS
May 13, 1998 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Me and my big mouth. Joe Sixpack writes a few stories about the great beer rip-off at Veterans Stadium, and the next thing I know my e-mail service nearly crashes from the outrage of the nation's ballpark boozers. The folks at Philly Online, the Daily News Web site, have been soliciting questions for Joe Sixpack, which I've dutifully answered (despite cutting into the time I must devote to professional beer-drinking). Some excerpts: Q. What's the beef? It doesn't help that I don't like beer, but what's the problem?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
As the song goes, "In heaven there is no beer," but East Falls has plenty at Fork and Barrel, the 6-week-old European beer haven. Fork and Barrel is the latest creation of Matt Scheller and Matt and Colleen Swartz, the Lehigh Valley trio who own and operate the Tap and Table and the Bookstore Speakeasy. They've ventured into Philadelphia with the concept of pairing a wide array of lesser-known European beers with dishes that are classically inspired farmhouse fare. Scheller heads up the beverage program that is so beer-centric, there's no wine or spirits.
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