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NEWS
April 15, 2016
Appearance: Should be clear, although unfiltered dry-hopped versions may be a bit hazy. - From the Beer Judge Certification Program style guidelines for American IPA A bit hazy? That might be the traditional standard. But these days, some of America's top-rated India pale ales are as overcast as the airspace above South Philly's oil refinery on an August afternoon. Murky, cloudy, and even milk-like are some of the descriptors for the likes of Lawson's Finest Liquids Sip of Sunshine , Trillium Dialed-In, and the Alchemist Heady Topper , all popular IPAs made in New England, where the trend began.
NEWS
December 31, 2007
Have you noticed that the price of beer is going up? The simple explanation is that supplies of hops and barley, two key ingredients in brew-making, are shrinking while demand for beer is increasing. Bad harvests and low prices for these commodities bear some of the blame, but another major factor is the nation's poorly fashioned energy policy. Thanks to government subsidies to promote ethanol production, more and more farmers are abandoning a variety of crops - including barley and hops - and switching to corn.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1987 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe's beer is back. Joseph W. Ortlieb, a member of one of Philadelphia's best-known brewing families, has returned to the business with a new beer that is now being distributed at beverage stores and taverns in Philadelphia and its Pennsylvania suburbs. It's called Trupert American Pilsner, and - hang on, Philadelphia - it's a micro beer, or one of those new, boutique brews that feature high-quality ingredients and prices to match. Ortlieb said Trupert should sell for about $16-$17 a case.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | By Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer
On a Southwest Philadelphia street corner that has seen its share of trouble, entrepreneurs saw opportunity. They bought a large corner property at 60th Street and Springfield Avenue and made plans for a mini-plaza featuring a self-service laundry, grocery, restaurant - and beer takeout. When neighborhood residents heard "beer," they sensed disaster, worried about an ugly past returning: They saw the threat of drug dealers again hanging out at the intersection. They saw the threat of guns.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | Joe Sixpack
HOW DOES a beer drinker navigate 10 days of nonstop suds? I asked a few pros for some tips. And by pros, I mean guys (and a gal) who are among the most die-hard beer fans I know.   All agreed a bit of planning is essential. "I actually sat down and looked through the events at phillybeerweek.org , and also made a list I heard through the hop vine," said Natalie DeChico, of Langhorne, who last year won the annual Philly Beer Geek contest. Stephen Lyford, of Bellmawr, N.J., who serves as Philly Beer Week's unofficial photographer, also checks his Facebook invites and Twitter feeds, then creates his own Google calendar.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
TOM SHERIDAN'S parents separated when he was a child, so he grew up with a dual citizenship in the river wards - splitting every week between his mom in Kensington and his dad in Port Richmond. So last year, when Sheridan had his Do Good Brewing epiphany while eating tomato pie and drinking his homemade beer at Tacconelli's Pizzeria, in Port Richmond, he wasn't shocked to realize that his life's dream was rooted in his childhood streets. "My whole business plan was to be a neighborhood kid with a neighborhood brewery, selling only to neighborhood bars, and donating a percentage of the sales to neighborhood charities," said Sheridan, 26. The Do Good Brewing Co., on Amber Street near Westmoreland, in Port Richmond, produces small batches of cream ale that is on tap from Cheers Cafe around the corner to the Kensington Pub, the Bridesburg Pub and neighborhood bars throughout the river wards.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2012 | Joe Sixpack
You wouldn't think it would be all that hard to be a vegetarian beer drinker. I mean, I've had about a zillion different beers over the years, and I usually examine my glass pretty closely before taking a mouthful. Not once have I noticed a pork chop in there. Beer is made with water, malt, hops and yeast. And yet, here I am at Old City's Khyber Pass Pub with my colleague Vance Legume, and he's holding things up wondering if the bartender's about to pour him a beer made with, I dunno, minced kitten parts.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
I remember the Ballantine scoreboard in right-center at Connie Mack Stadium. I remember Ballantine Blasts by Wes Covington and Johnny Callison. And I remember vendors with heavy cases of bottles, climbing through the steep left field bleachers yelling, "Hey getcha cold beer!" Yo, beer man! Over here! Ballantine and Wes and Johnny are gone from Philly. So too, sadly, is the noble beer vendor. They stopped selling beers in the stands at Veterans Stadium a few years ago. In an attempt to crack down on rowdyism and underage drinking, beer vendors were required to check IDs of everyone who purchased a cup. The plan failed when spectators griped about the hassle and vendors found it took twice as long to sell a rack of beers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dave Mela put the finishing touches on a batch of India pale ale that he had cooked on his kitchen stove the other night and recalled his introduction to home brewing. "I went to Britain about five years ago to visit my wife's family, and I went to a store, where I bought a kit for home-brew. I had never seen home- brew before. " He brought the can of malt extract back to the United States and forgot about it - just another odd souvenir. About six months later, on a whim, he brewed the batch.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, For The Inquirer
Head to Long Beach Island today, and you'll encounter the sizzling fun of the Hop Sauce Festival. As its name suggests, the fest fuses craft brews and spicy condiments. Toss in some local eats, live music, and a craft market for extra zest, and you have a recipe for a Shore day well spent. Now in its third year, Hop Sauce's organizers anticipate a crowd of about 7,000 people - double the size of the first festival. A collaboration between the Beach Haven specialty shop Spice It Up and the Jersey-born surf lifestyle brand Jetty (the flagship store is in Manahawkin)
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