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NEWS
April 4, 2014
EVERYONE in the beer industry is talking about the damn bubble. They're either worried that it's going to burst, or vowing that it will continue to grow. Like the earlier dot-com and housing bubbles, the craft-beer bubble is the product of what pessimists say is unsustainable growth, with about eight new breweries opening nationwide every week. The bubble can't help but explode, they say. Here are three reasons we're all gonna get soaked: 1. There are too many breweries There are about 2,800 breweries nationwide, with as many as 1,000 more on the horizon.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
A FEDERAL grand jury has charged former city official Dominic Verdi with seven counts of extortion, fraud and conspiracy for using his office to direct business to Chappy's Beer, Butts & Bets - a South Philadelphia beer distributor he co-owned. As deputy commissioner of the Department of Licenses & Inspections and a member of the Public Nuisance Task Force, Verdi, 58, allegedly orchestrated special treatment for bars and clubs that bought beer from Chappy's, according to an indictment from U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
For bar owners facing heat from the Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections, no problem was too large to handle with Deputy Commissioner Dominic Verdi on your side, federal prosecutors say. Failed an inspection? Not a problem. Running a gambling operation or a strip club? Don't sweat it. Implicated in the beating death of one of your patrons? No reason to shut your doors. As long as you bought your beer in the right place. A federal indictment unsealed Tuesday pulled back the curtain on an alleged long-standing arrangement between the former L&I official and dozens of bar and restaurant owners, all of whom say they received special treatment for buying their alcohol from Chappy's Beer, Butts and Bets, a South Philadelphia beer distributor in which Verdi held an ownership stake.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
TURNABOUT is fair play, but in the case of Philly Wine Week it's also long overdue. The inaugural grape-juice jag, which continues through Sunday, was modeled on the city's original bacchanal, Philly Beer Week. Never mind that the winos have stamina for only 8 days of festivities while the suds set goes 10 - that's close enough. After all, beer has been plagiarizing wine for years. The Everyman's drink, aiming to claw its way to the rarefied height of the vine, has adopted wine's expensive corked bottles, its aged and blended casks, its boorish Robert Parker ratings and lavish "pairing dinners.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Restaurateur Michael Schulson's vision for the city's most historic spot calls for Independence Hall, Independence Day, and lots of local beer. "Where does it become more American than that?" he asks. It doesn't, he answers. With that in mind, he's trying to make a beer garden out of a patio and part of the ground floor of the Rohm & Haas building at 100 S. Independence Mall West by the Fourth of July. "Philadelphians love their beer. I thought I would do a beer garden in Philly if I got the right space," Schulson said in an interview.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry C. Broadley, 89, of Springfield, Delaware County, a longtime engineer for the Christian Schmidt Brewing Co. who turned the key in the lock on the brewery's final day, ending an era, died Wednesday, March 12, of heart disease at Riddle Memorial Hospital. From 1955 to 1989, Mr. Broadley was the director of engineering for Schmidt's brewery, at Second and Hancock Streets in Northern Liberties. In its heyday, the plant was a Philadelphia institution. Started in 1860, Schmidt's grew until by 1970 it was producing more than three million barrels of beer annually.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
IT SHOULD not pass without acclaim that Monday marks the 100th anniversary of one of the great achievements in the history of beer. On St. Patrick's Day 1914, a New York City coroner named Dr. Thomas Hayes Curtin stood before his associates and others at a Bronx social club and unveiled his wondrous invention: Green beer. Never before had anyone laid eyes on such a spectacle. Beer, the color of shamrocks, filling the mugs of hundreds. "Everything possible was green or decorated with that color," an eyewitness reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
It's a love letter to her hometown of Cádiz, Spain. As a highlight of the 2014 Philadelphia Flamenco Festival, Rosario Toledo presented Vengo (Coming Back) Sunday night in the Forum space at WHYY's building on Independence Mall. The intimate setting became a theater in the round, with the artist just a few feet away from the overflow audience. Toledo's half-hour performance piece (assisted by the wonderfully deadpan Salva Calderón) highlighted her physical fearlessness, expert flamenco technique, and brilliant comedic timing.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
THERE'S something new and familiar awaiting Phillies fans heading down to the central Florida Gulf coast for spring training, and I'm not talking about Bobby Abreu. It's beer, and I mean the good stuff like we're used to finding in Philly - not the cases of Coors Light that college kids on spring break haul up to their beachfront hotel rooms. In the past two years, the region has seen an explosion of new brewpubs, breweries and craft-beer-pubs. From the newly expanded Sea Dog brewpub, just up the road from the Phils' home at Bright House Field, to new breweries in nearby St. Petersburg, small-batch beer has finally arrived.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last May, a Brooklyn-based do-it-yourself craft school and "makerspace" called 3rd Ward came to Philadelphia. The 27,000-square-foot temple to DIY in Northern Liberties was hyped as a new creative engine for the city, and the first step in the New York institution's nationwide expansion. Then, five months later, it shut down. But those who long for a place to brew beer, screen-print T-shirts, sew aprons, build terrariums, and make pickles have a second chance - albeit on a much humbler scale.
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