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Beethoven

ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You've never met anyone quite like Peter Serkin before. In his three-piece suit with white pocket square, he was a natty presence on the Perelman Theater stage Wednesday night. It was the playing that was rumpled. Not always. There were many moments of incredible polish, especially when it came to the pianist's approach to sound. He has that ability to conjure an instantly rounded tone without doing any violence to the start of the note. But all over - in Beethoven no less than in a contemporary score - Serkin, 66, occupied the space somewhere between an eccentric and outsider.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
For all of its reputed fabulousness, the Philadelphia Orchestra is also known for its winter contingency concerts. Most famously, Wolfgang Sawallisch once played Wagner on piano while weather-delayed orchestra musicians trickled in. On Thursday, music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin could not muster enough musicians for Vaughan Williams' Symphony No. 4 , so he substituted Ravel's Mother Goose Suite on four-hand piano with himself and none...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 ("Pastoral") is usually about as safe as concert programming can be. Yet when the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia decided to opened its 50th season with Beethoven's celebration of nature and weather Monday at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, it took one of the bigger chances of its recent history. Audiences here aren't used to hearing that music played by 35 or so players. But then, music director (and composer) Sir Dirk Brossé (newly knighted in his native Belgium)
NEWS
December 15, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The more you admire Peter Serkin, the more likely he is to leave you exasperated. One of America's great pianists, he loves steering himself out of the mainstream, sometimes to artistic Valhalla, sometimes into the ozone. Both extremes were apparent in his Tuesday recital, presented by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society. On the merit of his performance of Beethoven's fearsome Piano Sonata in B-flat major ("Hammerklavier"), the recital was among the great classical events of the waning year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In a somewhat unconventional program, Yannick Nézet-Séguin led the Philadelphia Orchestra through the lighter side of Shostakovich - assuming there actually is one. Even when the composer seems to be kidding around, his music hints at something subversive, that the music means much more than it says, and what it says is always dangling out of reach. That's why you want to hear it again. The objects of curiosity Wednesday at the Kimmel Center were Shostakovich's seldom-heard Piano Concerto No. 2 and music for the film The Gadfly - paired with Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 - creating a provocative conclusion to the St. Petersburg Festival that could have been less convincing had performances not been so purposeful.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
Andre Watts had planned a program of Chopin and Liszt for his recital Sunday at Verizon Hall, but changed to Beethoven and Chopin. The first would have been an essay on the rise and dominance of pianists and their idiom in the 19th century, but by prefacing Chopin with Beethoven, Watts may have been reminding listeners of music's ability to surmount and adapt in times of apparent crisis. To contemporaries, Beethoven's death in 1827 seemed to mean the end of music. What else could be said, after all?
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
CAMDEN - In music, as in other areas of life, a young artist's ideal situation is one where successes are noticed and mistakes are understandable - one reason Symphony in C is worth the trip to Camden, both for musicians and audiences. When the flu sidelined the up-and-coming pianist Di Wu, her Saturday replacement, Sara Daneshpour, had a star-is-born opportunity. She at least had welcome exposure that will serve her well in future, not-so-last-minute engagements. Music director Rossen Milanov gave a highly considered performance of Wagner's Siegfried Idyll that might not have worked outside the resonant acoustic of the Gordon Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012
IN CASE YOU haven't heard, yarn bombing is the new graffiti, and not just because it's cleaner and more environmentally-friendly. Yarn bombing is the act of knitting a cozy or warmer to spontaneously and secretly wrap around something in a public space.One famous examples of this guerrilla knitting is last April's bombing of the Rocky statue at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. To prove how mainstream the movement has become, it's moved into...
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven and Falla. Only one conductor would dare to pair such radically dissimilar composers with the Philadelphia Orchestra: the late Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos. Planned by him before his death last year, the program on Thursday fell to the orchestra's conductor in residence, Cristian Macelaru. He is as strong-minded as anyone standing before the orchestra this season and, overall, made the evening work in a manner hugely different from Frühbeck de Burgos'. Beethoven was represented by his least severe orchestral work, the Symphony No. 6 ("Pastoral")
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
BEETHOVEN'S "MISSA SOLEMNIS. " Performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, Wolfgang Sawallisch conducting. With soprano Christine Brewer, mezzo-soprano Marjana Lipovsek, tenor Robert Dean Smith, bass Alfred Reiter and the Westminster Symphonic Choir. 8 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday, Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $18-$60. Info: 215-893-1999. When Beethoven's friend and pupil, the Archduke Rudolf, was elevated to archbishop, the composer was commissioned to write a solemn mass for the occasion.
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