CollectionsBeethoven
IN THE NEWS

Beethoven

ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In a somewhat unconventional program, Yannick Nézet-Séguin led the Philadelphia Orchestra through the lighter side of Shostakovich - assuming there actually is one. Even when the composer seems to be kidding around, his music hints at something subversive, that the music means much more than it says, and what it says is always dangling out of reach. That's why you want to hear it again. The objects of curiosity Wednesday at the Kimmel Center were Shostakovich's seldom-heard Piano Concerto No. 2 and music for the film The Gadfly - paired with Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 - creating a provocative conclusion to the St. Petersburg Festival that could have been less convincing had performances not been so purposeful.
NEWS
February 5, 2002 | By Daniel Webster FOR THE INQUIRER
Andre Watts had planned a program of Chopin and Liszt for his recital Sunday at Verizon Hall, but changed to Beethoven and Chopin. The first would have been an essay on the rise and dominance of pianists and their idiom in the 19th century, but by prefacing Chopin with Beethoven, Watts may have been reminding listeners of music's ability to surmount and adapt in times of apparent crisis. To contemporaries, Beethoven's death in 1827 seemed to mean the end of music. What else could be said, after all?
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
CAMDEN - In music, as in other areas of life, a young artist's ideal situation is one where successes are noticed and mistakes are understandable - one reason Symphony in C is worth the trip to Camden, both for musicians and audiences. When the flu sidelined the up-and-coming pianist Di Wu, her Saturday replacement, Sara Daneshpour, had a star-is-born opportunity. She at least had welcome exposure that will serve her well in future, not-so-last-minute engagements. Music director Rossen Milanov gave a highly considered performance of Wagner's Siegfried Idyll that might not have worked outside the resonant acoustic of the Gordon Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012
IN CASE YOU haven't heard, yarn bombing is the new graffiti, and not just because it's cleaner and more environmentally-friendly. Yarn bombing is the act of knitting a cozy or warmer to spontaneously and secretly wrap around something in a public space.One famous examples of this guerrilla knitting is last April's bombing of the Rocky statue at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. To prove how mainstream the movement has become, it's moved into...
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
BEETHOVEN'S "MISSA SOLEMNIS. " Performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, Wolfgang Sawallisch conducting. With soprano Christine Brewer, mezzo-soprano Marjana Lipovsek, tenor Robert Dean Smith, bass Alfred Reiter and the Westminster Symphonic Choir. 8 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday, Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. Tickets: $18-$60. Info: 215-893-1999. When Beethoven's friend and pupil, the Archduke Rudolf, was elevated to archbishop, the composer was commissioned to write a solemn mass for the occasion.
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Somebody in Verizon Hall tried to make Vladimir Jurowski shut up on Friday - and failed. One of the Philadelphia Orchestra's favorite guest conductors (among musicians and audiences), Jurowski was giving a preperformance explication of Prokofiev's Symphony No. 6 that was going on a bit longer than usual. Then from the hall, somebody began applauding, as if to say, "That's enough. " Coolly, the conductor explained why these matters are important, and assured the heckler, "The symphony is short.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The fashion world has long popularized clothes that appear to be turned inside out. Why shouldn't the Philadelphia Orchestra do its own version of that every so often? How could that work? Dvorák's Symphony No. 8 was so significantly reimagined by guest conductor Jakub Hruša that you'd think the prevailing, mellifluous tradition of Wolfgang Sawallisch never existed. The music was a rougher ride but full of incident. Orchestral sonorities that are normally string-dominated shared the sound picture more equally with brass and winds.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Violinist/conductor Itzhak Perlman enjoys a rare freedom in classical music: His relationship with audiences is such that he needs only to show up, and adoration is assured. What's frustrating is that Perlman doesn't do more with that status, especially since his string of subscription concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra this week features four performances, rather than the usual three. This program stands to reach more listeners than perhaps any other this season. From a repertoire standpoint, Perlman has never been terribly ambitious as a violinist.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The paradox of grand, glitzy piano competitions is that contestants' musical personalities don't fully emerge until after the prizes are won and the stress of achieving them is past. Who - really - is Vadym Kholodenko, the 26-year-old gold medal winner of the recent 14th Van Cliburn International Competition? Philadelphia Orchestra audiences will be the first to find out when he plays his first (noncompetition) U.S. concerto performance at 8 p.m. Thursday at the Mann Center. This is a pianist who walked in with a strong inner identity and very much kept it intact.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The good salesman cloaks his charm in virtuous clothing. The great one lets you see the pitch, and yet through some act of charisma make you feel buoyed in having assented to both the sale and his crafty methods. You had to admire the way the St. Lawrence Quartet was selling it Tuesday night at the Perelman Theater. As the latest visitors in the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society's undeclared string quartet festival, the St. Lawrence's solicitousness extended beyond an extremely extroverted playing style to body language that, for two members, involved bouncing out of chairs or literally kicking up their heels.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|