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NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Violinist/conductor Itzhak Perlman enjoys a rare freedom in classical music: His relationship with audiences is such that he needs only to show up, and adoration is assured. What's frustrating is that Perlman doesn't do more with that status, especially since his string of subscription concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra this week features four performances, rather than the usual three. This program stands to reach more listeners than perhaps any other this season. From a repertoire standpoint, Perlman has never been terribly ambitious as a violinist.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Known among classical piano insiders as a place to learn pain-free, injury-free keyboard technique, the Golandsky Institute is, for most of us, a welcome piano-recital festival during the slow summertime concert period, featuring its own pool of talent not often heard in these parts. Yet the Taubman Approach - the method championed by the institute's Edna Golandsky to promote ease of execution - seems not to encourage any sort of pianistic uniformity among its disciples.
NEWS
November 3, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Past visits by pianist Piotr Anderszewski have inspired nothing but admiration for his risky repertoire choices - namely, the great but neglected Karol Szymanowski - but left you wanting to hear his artistry applied to more mainstream stuff. On his return Monday to the Kimmel Center with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra, he delivered two superbly rendered Mozart piano concertos - one of his longtime specialties - in a great occasion that lived up to high expectations. Anderszewski speaks Mozart's language with his own kind of elegance, which is born out of Mozart's Baroque-period predecessors, rather than looking back from Beethoven.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - The reaction to James Levine's return to conducting Sunday can only be described in Yiddish: Geschrei - an outcry like no other. Amid Levine's two years of surgeries, setbacks, and rehabilitation for back, spine, and other problems, many feared the beloved Metropolitan Opera music director would never again be seen alive, much less conducting a program of Wagner, Beethoven, and Schubert. But there he was, arriving onstage in Carnegie Hall with the Met Orchestra, riding a custom-made scooter with a rostrum that raised him, in the fashion of a hydraulic stage elevator, slightly above the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The good salesman cloaks his charm in virtuous clothing. The great one lets you see the pitch, and yet through some act of charisma make you feel buoyed in having assented to both the sale and his crafty methods. You had to admire the way the St. Lawrence Quartet was selling it Tuesday night at the Perelman Theater. As the latest visitors in the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society's undeclared string quartet festival, the St. Lawrence's solicitousness extended beyond an extremely extroverted playing style to body language that, for two members, involved bouncing out of chairs or literally kicking up their heels.
LIVING
April 11, 2000 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In the chamber music world, new string quartets are often thought to be the one-stop domain of the restlessly modern Kronos Quartet. But Kronos misses much, as suggested by the Takacs Quartet's foray into new music with Bright Sheng's String Quartet No. 3. The piece's local debut on Friday was part of an ongoing Takacs commitment to the piece, which the quartet premiered in 1993. That reflects remarkable devotion, and the reason is obvious: The music grows out of the great string quartet tradition with unforced freshness and communicative imagination.
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Intermission chatter at Wednesday's Christian Zacharias recital took on ominous tones when one sage pianophile observed, "He tends to take things to the extreme. " And what makes Zacharias one of the most fascinating elder-statesman keyboard personalities is that you never know which extreme he'll take. Or if you're going to like it. Possessed of effortless technique, decades of accumulated repertoire, huge intellect, and wide-ranging imagination, he has options. The first half of his Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert at the Kimmel Center brought together C.P.E.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Pianist Mitsuko Uchida has been a singular object of audience adoration over the last 25 years - for more than the reasons that are immediately apparent. Yes, you had to love the way she exuberantly arrived on the Perelman Theater stage Tuesday, in colorful harem pants suggesting she was a recently escaped genie. Artistically, she's unshakably solid, often taking on repertoire step by step from Mozart to Schubert to Beethoven. Her analytic powers yield extraordinarily communicative performances of Schoenberg and Berg.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
If anybody needed convincing that Lang Lang isn't just a pianist with hot fingers, cool clothes, and lots of self-promotion, positive proof came in both concertos he played with the Philadelphia Orchestra this week at Verizon Hall. Played on Thursday, Liszt's Piano Concerto No. 1 will also be heard by the masses at his Saturday concert and cinemacast with the orchestra, as well as at the Monday repeat screening. Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 2 was reserved for the live-only audience on Friday at the Kimmel Center and for Tuesday, when he and the orchestra play Carnegie Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2001 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A first meeting with pianist Charles Rosen can seem momentous. In books, essays and recordings, he's a huge presence, crystallizing stray musical thoughts with realizations that set lightbulbs flashing over your head. He can make you feel as if you've acquired some sixth musical sense. So, upon seeing him in a chaotic backstage situation where somebody says, "Here! Meet Charles Rosen," it's easy to blurt out "Thanks for changing my life!" Embarrassed, Rosen looked to the floor in that particular instance and didn't say much.
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