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Beethoven

NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The cost of war was palpable in the Philadelphia Orchestra's Thursday program of Strauss, Shostakovich, and Beethoven, one of Yannick Nézet-Séguin's most conceptually formidable and musically resourceful concerts. At this point in history, few of the musicians onstage have firsthand experience of the tragedies portrayed in Shostakovich's 1959 Cello Concerto No. 1 - a significant deterrent to tapping the music's fierce subtext about post-Stalin Russia. Nonetheless, the performance was bursting with empathy, the most audible manifestation being the extended cadenza in which cellist Johannes Moser (replacing Truls Mørk)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
You've never met anyone quite like Peter Serkin before. In his three-piece suit with white pocket square, he was a natty presence on the Perelman Theater stage Wednesday night. It was the playing that was rumpled. Not always. There were many moments of incredible polish, especially when it came to the pianist's approach to sound. He has that ability to conjure an instantly rounded tone without doing any violence to the start of the note. But all over - in Beethoven no less than in a contemporary score - Serkin, 66, occupied the space somewhere between an eccentric and outsider.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
What a difference when chamber music is played with absolutely no extraneous sound. Violinist Isabelle Faust and pianist Alexander Melnikov have considerable big-concert-hall careers. For Monday's Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert at the Kimmel Center, however, they left that part of their musical lives behind and met small-scale works from the Beethoven, Weber, and Schubert repertoires - so much on their own terms (even more than in their prestigious recordings for Harmonia Mundi)
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
After more than two centuries of continuous performances by the greatest artists of any era, how could Mozart's classic Marriage of Figaro reveal anything new? Not possible, some connoisseurs say. We can hope only that current performers live up to the gods of the past. Suddenly, Figaro arrives in a fresh guise. Nearly every minute in the new Sony Classical recording, due out in March, is a new discovery. Ornaments, cadenzas, phrase readings I never imagined are everywhere.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Violinist/conductor Itzhak Perlman enjoys a rare freedom in classical music: His relationship with audiences is such that he needs only to show up, and adoration is assured. What's frustrating is that Perlman doesn't do more with that status, especially since his string of subscription concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra this week features four performances, rather than the usual three. This program stands to reach more listeners than perhaps any other this season. From a repertoire standpoint, Perlman has never been terribly ambitious as a violinist.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Pianist Yuja Wang was pretty much canonized by her Kimmel Center audience Thursday, and perhaps not for typical reasons of hot fingers and charismatic glamour. In a promising collaboration with Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphia Orchestra, Wang scaled the pianistic Everest that is Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 3 with a sense of ease that took the music to a particular place that it can rarely go. Having heard Wang grow up before my very ears at the Curtis Institute, I'm convinced she is basically a chamber-music pianist - with a mastery of the keyboard that allows her to bring the same flowing conversational quality to the Rachmaninoff concerto that she had in Beethoven's Violin Sonata No. 10. In Rachmaninoff, the conversation was a high-level one between her and any given phrase, duly transmitted to the audience without the slightest pretense or Scriabinesque neuroses.
NEWS
September 29, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven's practicality-defying Symphony No. 9 rarely sits comfortably on orchestral programs: Not long enough to be heard by itself, the piece is so idiosyncratically monumental that finding suitable pairings is tough. A bookend approach with Beethoven's Symphony No. 1 is the easy way out. On Thursday, Yannick Nézet-Séguin opened the first subscription concert of his second Philadelphia Orchestra season determined not to make the Westminster Choir come all the way from Princeton just for Beethoven's final movement.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The paradox of grand, glitzy piano competitions is that contestants' musical personalities don't fully emerge until after the prizes are won and the stress of achieving them is past. Who - really - is Vadym Kholodenko, the 26-year-old gold medal winner of the recent 14th Van Cliburn International Competition? Philadelphia Orchestra audiences will be the first to find out when he plays his first (noncompetition) U.S. concerto performance at 8 p.m. Thursday at the Mann Center. This is a pianist who walked in with a strong inner identity and very much kept it intact.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Known among classical piano insiders as a place to learn pain-free, injury-free keyboard technique, the Golandsky Institute is, for most of us, a welcome piano-recital festival during the slow summertime concert period, featuring its own pool of talent not often heard in these parts. Yet the Taubman Approach - the method championed by the institute's Edna Golandsky to promote ease of execution - seems not to encourage any sort of pianistic uniformity among its disciples.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The 32 Beethoven piano sonatas - often called the New Testament of keyboard music - track the epic journey from brash youth to Olympian serenity of one of Western Civilization's towering personalities. However tantalizing, the idea of hearing them all on a single day seems impossible. Surely, one wouldn't have expected such an endeavor from Stewart Goodyear, 35, the Curtis Institute graduate best known for Gershwin. Nonetheless, he'll perform all 32 sonatas Saturday in three chronological installments - 10 a.m., 3 p.m., and 8 p.m. - at Princeton's McCarter Theatre Center.
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