CollectionsBeetle
IN THE NEWS

Beetle

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The story goes that Mikhail Baryshnikov, the big-time ballet dancer from Bolshoi country, was in Paris some months ago concurrently (but not necessarily concomitantly) with Roman Polanski, the big-time film director. Neither was doing what he is famous for. Mikhail was sitting in a theater, watching a play. And Roman was up there on the stage - acting, not directing. It was a part that Roman might have been born to play: a man who who goes to bed one night feeling a little peaked, and awakens in the morning to find he has changed into a beetle.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The United States, its borders growing more porous by the day, is under constant assault and, to hear the front-line fighters tell it, the battle against the minuscule attackers is slowly being lost. "The rate of introduction of these organisms is increasing, and the efforts that we use to exclude them are decreasing," is how Vic Mastro, the director of the United States Department of Agriculture's Plant Protection Center, puts it. "These organisms" are, for the most part, bugs.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 30-year-old maple tree, its canopy carrying the full green of midsummer, is tall enough to scrape the third-floor windows of Mike Marinelli's house. Looking into its leafy crown, Marinelli, 66, wonders if he will live long enough to see the tree that replaces it grow to such a size. "My son was born about the time they planted them," Marinelli said of the neighborhood's maples. "He grew right along with the trees. I'm too old to watch one grow up again. " Come fall, city crews will cut down Marinelli's maple and dozens, perhaps hundreds, more in an effort to eradicate the Asian longhorn beetle, a scourge that has infested the tree-besotted Ravenswood neighborhood on Chicago's north side.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Except for the bare spots - the places where the 809 trees were felled - the once-leafier, once-greener Chicago neighborhood of Ravenswood does not look like ground zero of a major ecological war. But look closer, where the mature trees - cut, chipped up, carted away and burned - have been replaced by saplings, and you find a long-settled north-side neighborhood that in the last year has been transformed by the Asian longhorned beetle. The beetle, potentially one of the most damaging insects ever to invade this country, was found in Ravenswood last summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the last 19 years, the Postal Service issued commemoratives promoting October as National Stamp Collecting Month. The focus has been to attract youngsters to the hobby. Last week the Postal Service issued a sheet of 20 stamps that should also catch the glance of older letter writers. The 33-cent stamps depict 16 insects and four spiders, all crawling in the designs. The gum side of each stamp includes text describing the subjects, which are: the black widow, elderberry longhorn, lady beetle, yellow garden spider, dogbane beetle, flower fly, assassin bug, ebony jewelwing, velvet ant, monarch caterpillar, monarch butterfly, eastern Hercules beetle, bombardier beetle, dung beetle, spotted water beetle, true katydid, spinybacked spider, periodical cicada, scorpionfly and jumping spider.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Auto Editor
Cats may have nine lives, but Beetles live forever. In spirit and style - if not substance - the new Volkswagen Bug has arrived here, riding the old Bug's huge nostalgia wave. In its first days in Philadelphia-area VW showrooms, the Beetle is drawing crowds that haven't been seen since the 1970s. Seems like everyone wants to sit in it, look at it, turn the steering wheel . . . and most of all, tell their own personal Beetle stories. Usually the listener has a Beetle story or two, too. "It's a little bit of everyone," said Vince Evans, sales manager at Holbert's Volkswagen in Warrington, Bucks County, one of the area's premier dealerships.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Like any good scientist, entomologist Daniel Otte has keen powers of observation. Unlike most, he is highly skilled at rendering those observations with a paintbrush. Otte, a preeminent expert on grasshoppers and crickets, has long been painting insects and other creatures for use in scientific articles and texts. Starting Saturday, 32 of his images are to be displayed as art in a new exhibit at his workplace: the Academy of Natural Sciences. The illustrator-scientist, not one to hog the limelight despite having identified more than 1,500 species in his career, is a bit taken aback by the focus on his paintings.
NEWS
March 30, 1998 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
The Volkswagen Beetle first officially landed on American shores in 1949. It was hardly a beachhead. On Jan. 8 of that year, two Beetles - the total sales for the year - were shipped from the Netherlands to New York. Max Hoffmann, a Fifth Avenue importer who also marketed another car new to Americans that year - the Jaguar - sold the Beetles for $800 apiece. Although the "Beetle" label had been stuck on the car more than 10 years earlier, these two pioneers weren't even called Beetles.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Grasshoppers whose rainbow-colored wings look like something from Dr. Seuss. Trays full of locusts, thought to be the same species as in the biblical plague in the book of Exodus. A horned beetle bigger than an ice-cream sandwich. If you have made it this far without squirming, then step behind the scenes at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. In the midst of its bicentennial year, the nation's oldest natural history museum is offering the public a chance to ogle some its millions of scientific treasures that normally are stored out of sight.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A landscaper found the first signs of the destructive pest last week. He was checking the health of ash trees at a strip shopping center in Bridgewater, Somerset County, when he spotted the telltale damage. He alerted state officials, who shared specimens with a federal lab, which confirmed everyone's suspicions: The emerald ash borer had come to New Jersey. An invasive beetle that has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the country, the insect had already been detected in nearby Pennsylvania and New York counties.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dreaded Khapra beetle has a voracious and varied appetite. Resistant to insecticides, it's all but indestructible. As such, it is considered one of the world's most fearsome pests of grains, rice, beans and other "stored products. " And it is high on the least-wanted list at U.S. borders. Yet, there it was. Twice in September, officials at Philadelphia International Airport discovered - and hastily dispatched - the beetle and its larvae. The insects had come into the country aboard food that passengers carried with them on Qatar Airlines flights from Qatar's capital, Doha.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A landscaper found the first signs of the destructive pest last week. He was checking the health of ash trees at a strip shopping center in Bridgewater, Somerset County, when he spotted the telltale damage. He alerted state officials, who shared specimens with a federal lab, which confirmed everyone's suspicions: The emerald ash borer had come to New Jersey. An invasive beetle that has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the country, the insect had already been detected in nearby Pennsylvania and New York counties.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
Seventy-five percent of the people who bought the previous-generation Volkswagen Beetle were female. Reasonably enough, the high priests of marketing at VW wanted to increase the number of Boy Beetle Buyers (BBBs). So when the automaker redesigned the Beetle for 2012, it made more masculine styling a priority. Goodbye, dashboard flower vases. Hello, sheet-metal male aggression. The effort paid off. Males quickly became 40 percent of the new car's customers (50 percent in the case of the turbo model)
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The spread of the Southern pine beetle in South Jersey was not as severe as was feared last year, but the pest remains a serious threat in the Pinelands, the state reported Monday. Of the 27,000 acres lost to the insect since 2010, most are in the southern Pinelands, stretching from Burlington County's Mullica River to Cape May and Cumberland Counties, the Department of Environmental Protection said. Last year, the beetles killed 6,200 acres of pines, down from 7,000 acres in 2011, an 11 percent decline, according to the agency.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Grasshoppers whose rainbow-colored wings look like something from Dr. Seuss. Trays full of locusts, thought to be the same species as in the biblical plague in the book of Exodus. A horned beetle bigger than an ice-cream sandwich. If you have made it this far without squirming, then step behind the scenes at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University. In the midst of its bicentennial year, the nation's oldest natural history museum is offering the public a chance to ogle some its millions of scientific treasures that normally are stored out of sight.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2012 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
2012 Volkswagen Beetle 2.5 L vs. 2012 Mazda MX-5 Miata Special Edition: A spring fling showdown. Prices: The Volkswagen starts at $24,975 as tested (it was a preproduction model); the Mazda was $32,020 (no options). Conventional wisdom: Cute … and a little girlie. Marketer's pitch: The Beetle: "Still turns heads. Just faster. " The Mazda: "Thrills through all six senses. " Reality: Two different approaches to a fun step back in time. Retro showdown: The introduction of the Beetle last spring made me long for cars of yore.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Stephen Singer, Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn. - The mild winter has given many northern farmers a break from shoveling and a welcome chance to catch up on maintenance. But it could also lead to a tough spring, as many pests that would normally freeze have not. Winters are usually what one agriculture specialist calls a "reset button" that gives farmers a fresh start come planting season. But with relatively mild temperatures and little snow, insects are surviving, growing, and, in some areas, already munching on budding plants.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Our relationship to nature isn't a done deal or a set formula. As a reminder of that, we only need look at the appealing simplicity and interest of several featured artworks relating to ancient Egypt in an otherwise diverse display, "The Decorated Book: Continuing a Tradition," at the Athenaeum. One of these, a big "scarab" woodcarving (actually a beetle-shaped case for a book), immediately caught my eye. John Magnan recently handcarved this solid and well-conceived sculpture with movable parts.
NEWS
January 8, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nothing seemed to stand in their way last year, as they marched across South Jersey like an invading army, leaving denuded pine trees in their wake. The exploding population of Dendroctonus frontalis - the Southern pine beetle - killed 14,000 acres of pines in 2010 and was expected to destroy at least that many in 2011. But when state officials checked recently, they were surprised. Only half of the anticipated damage had been inflicted. What happened? A voracious predator, the checkered or clerid beetle, had gobbled up many of the pine beetles, helping to reduce their number.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2011 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
Meet the Beetles: Volkswagen this week offered the media a chance to test-drive its 2012 Beetles for a day near its U.S. headquarters in Herndon, Va. Price: $18,995 for a 2.5-liter, five-cylinder base model, and $23,995 for the 2.0-liter turbo. Marketer's pitch: "Everyone deserves a better car. " Tim Mahoney, executive vice president and chief product and marketing officer, said before the event that he was among the many new leaders for a company hoping to change its place, if not in the world, at least in the United States.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|