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NEWS
April 29, 2008
WAS IT only a week ago that we were the center of the universe? Now, all the camera lights, the 50 daily e-mails from Bill Clinton and the embarrassing behavior by the national media surrounding the Democratic primary have shifted to Indiana and North Carolina. We're relieved to have our city back. But the weeks leading up to last Tuesday's primary were good weeks for Philadlephia. We got the Colbert bump. On national TV, we watched our mayor being funny and our former mayor being even funnier.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
A gentle, non-punitive approach to improving dogs' behavior and a lucid text that any novice should be able to understand distinguish Everyday Dog: Training Your Dog to Be the Companion You Want by Nancy E. Johnson (Howell Book House, Macmillan Publishing, $17.95). Of the scores of dog-training, problem-solving books I've read, this is the first that offers different techniques for training puppies and adult canines, even when the same problem, such as housebreaking, is concerned.
SPORTS
December 11, 1989 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
Snowballs rained down, dangerously and persistently. Fights broke out in the stands. Several individuals ran onto the playing field and disrupted play. Dozens of customers invaded the sidelines in search of snow for ammunition. If anarchy did not reign in some sections of Veterans Stadium, it was chillingly close. And Eagles owner Norman Braman - who had as his guest at the game yesterday Paul Tagliabue, the NFL's new commissioner - was furious. "It's a disgrace," Braman said, after the Eagles' 20-10 victory over Dallas.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | By MARK MCDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
A day after the violent outbreak of looting in the East Market Street area during the parade for Julius Erving, some police and gang-control workers started talking to students about what went on. John White Sr., an assistant city managing director and head of the city's community intervention program, said he sent 18 community intervention workers in two-person teams into schools and public housing complexes to hold "rap sessions on these anti-social...
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania professor who studies psychopaths has found hope for improving human behavior in a surprising place: fish oil. A new study led by Adrian Raine, a psychologist in Penn's criminology department, found giving children a fruit drink mixed with omega-3 fatty acids - a key ingredient in fish oil - improved their behavior. Strangely, the behavior of parents also improved, even though they weren't taking the supplements. More on that later. Raine's ultimate goal is ambitious: to reduce crime.
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | By Paul Bukovec
This month - Domestic Violence Awareness Month - the Commentary Page is featuring a series of essays by workers in the field of domestic abuse. In almost 16 years of counseling men who abuse their partners, I've been asked lots of questions about my clients. The thing people most frequently want to know is: Can these guys change? My answer is always an emphatic but qualified yes, because while I've witnessed many dramatic and inspiring conversions, the countervailing truth is that relatively very few abusive men actually come for help or stick with the grueling process.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Moreland High School seniors and their friends must leave their water balloons, beach balls, kazoos and water pistols at home when they don caps and gowns for their commencement ceremony Wednesday. Although they may toss their caps during the "graduation salute" at the end of commencement, no jeering or cat calling will be tolerated. The banned items and behavior are listed in a sternly worded letter to seniors and their parents from high school principal Robert H. Bubeck and assistant principals L. John DeLaurentis and Charles D. Cassady.
NEWS
December 12, 1986
A Dec. 3 article referred to a case of a battered woman who fatally shot her husband as he tried to hit her with a piece of pipe. During the five years of their marriage, she had suffered repeated physical abuse, which resulted in numerous injuries, including the loss of sight in one eye. The defense sought to introduce testimony on the "battered women's syndrome," which the judge did not allow. The story said that "the syndrome . . . can cause irrational behavior in a victim," in a sentence worded such that readers may have erroneously inferred that the woman's lawyer made such a statement.
LIVING
November 20, 1998 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Some people want to explore space, make a million dollars, or become a movie star. Malik, 9, wants stickers on his behavior chart - lots of them. He can earn them by speaking quietly in the house, staying in bed before 6:30 a.m., and dressing for school, eating and brushing his teeth with a pleasant attitude. The size of his allowance depends on the sticker pile-up. He likes to go shopping with his foster father, and will use some of his money to get a toy for his foster brother back home, too. Neglect and abuse are in Malik's background, and he receives therapy to help him deal with it. He takes medication for an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and for behavior management.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
An epidemic of coarse and obnoxious behavior is in full swing in the workplace. Examples are the boss who begins a meeting late, then takes phone calls while his subordinate sits and waits, and the co-worker who drains the last of the coffee and fails to start a fresh pot, according to Training magazine. Some advice for the civil-minded who find themselves confronted by obnoxious office behavior: Watch your language. Avoid vulgarities, sarcasm and dismissive responses like "whatever," which implies "I don't care.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 2016 | By Liz Weston, NERDWALLET
Efforts to make us smarter about money don't seem to be working. A Harvard Business School study found that personal-finance classes taught in high school had no effect on "financial outcomes" such as how much people saved or how likely they were to miss payments on debt. A report for Management Science found that even intensive instruction had "negligible effects" on behavior. Other research, however, has found methods that show promise in teaching financial literacy. If you want to improve your relationship with money or teach your children about personal finance, these findings may help do that.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Philadelphia businesses could soon be fined or shut down for the bad behavior of their patrons or those who hang around nearby. The new regulations are part of a so-called Nuisance Business Bill that Mayor Kenney backed, at a ceremonial signing event, on Monday. "They're responsible for what happens on the sidewalks outside of their business," said Councilwoman Cindy Bass, who introduced the legislation. "They're responsible for the climate they are creating, based on the type of business they are operating.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Respect is needed for civil elections This election, perhaps more than ever, we need to ensure journalists have the freedom to report the facts without fear of harassment ("Campaign abuse demands a journalism Bill of Rights," Philly.com, Aug. 30). Fundamentally, this comes down to the erosion of civility in America. Sixty-nine percent of Americans agree that civility has decreased in the last few years, or that two out of three voters say the 2016 campaign is less civil than other elections.
NEWS
August 28, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: During my wedding reception a month ago, one of the guests (a friend of my mom's) poured a glass of water on the DJ's laptop because he felt the music was too loud and he wanted it shut down. My husband was furious and asked the guest to leave. The incident was blamed on too much alcohol, and it ruined the rest of the evening. Many guests were upset and left. The man ended up paying the DJ to replace the laptop and sent us a note of apology for his behavior. My question is, must we send a thank-you note to him and his wife for the wedding gift they gave us?
BUSINESS
August 13, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Lancaster General Health, a unit of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, picked King of Prussia's Universal Health Services Inc. to operate a planned 126-bed behavioral-health hospital planned in Lancaster, Pa. The $30 million facility is expected to open two years from now, Lancaster General said. The partnership will have a six-member board of governors, with three members from each partner. Lancaster General will lease the land to the partnership. UHS, which already owns eight behavioral-health facilities in Pennsylvania, will operate the hospital.
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: Is there anything I can do to get my wife to suspend a habit for a few months? A family wedding is coming up, and she has the full outfit, will be getting her hair done, all the details. The crowning touch for me would be if she could stop picking at her fingers long enough for them to heal - they are often bloody as the result of this compulsive behavior. This has been a longtime issue for me, and my attempts at expressing concern have never been well received. Basically, I've been told, angrily, to butt out. Is there a way I can approach this?
NEWS
July 6, 2016
The progressive drive to broadly define and thoroughly eradicate political "corruption" has corrupted politics. But discord is not altogether pandemic in Washington, and last week, a unanimous Supreme Court, in this term's most important decision, limited the discretion prosecutors have to criminalize politics. Former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell was sentenced to prison for unseemly behavior. He accepted from a Virginia businessman gifts and loans valued at more than $170,000. The businessman wanted McDonnell to help promote his dietary-supplement business, including by helping him persuade state universities to study its products.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Selma Blair apologizes Actress Selma Blair issued a nifty apology for her erratic, wild behavior during a flight Monday from Cancun, Mexico, to Los Angeles. Blair was removed from the plane on a stretcher. "After a lovely trip with my son and his dad, I mixed alcohol with medication, and that caused me to black out and led me to say and do things that I deeply regret," Blair tells Vanity Fair, referring to her son Arthur and his dad, Blair ex-bf Jason Bleick . "My son was with his dad asleep with his headphones on, so there is that saving grace.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
DEAR ABBY: I have officially found my biggest pet peeve. It's a pervasive issue with my generation of committing to something and not showing up. They'll flake at the last minute, or refuse to commit to something because there's a possibility something better will come along. And constantly showing up late has become normal with young adults. Furthermore, despite the many technological advances that allow us to communicate quickly, their failure to communicate about plans astounds and infuriates me. I've encountered this problem too often with friends, coworkers, bosses and professors at university.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I have been with my boyfriend for four years. We have lived together for one. I am nine years older, and he comes from a very traditional part of the world. We are trying to get pregnant, but the thought of scientific intervention puts him off. I have tried to explain that the longer we wait, the harder it will be, but he thinks that if we keep trying, it will happen. I am afraid that if it doesn't, we will end, because he does want children and I won't be able to. How do I get him to face the age difference and go to the doctor?
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