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NEWS
April 29, 2008
WAS IT only a week ago that we were the center of the universe? Now, all the camera lights, the 50 daily e-mails from Bill Clinton and the embarrassing behavior by the national media surrounding the Democratic primary have shifted to Indiana and North Carolina. We're relieved to have our city back. But the weeks leading up to last Tuesday's primary were good weeks for Philadlephia. We got the Colbert bump. On national TV, we watched our mayor being funny and our former mayor being even funnier.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
A gentle, non-punitive approach to improving dogs' behavior and a lucid text that any novice should be able to understand distinguish Everyday Dog: Training Your Dog to Be the Companion You Want by Nancy E. Johnson (Howell Book House, Macmillan Publishing, $17.95). Of the scores of dog-training, problem-solving books I've read, this is the first that offers different techniques for training puppies and adult canines, even when the same problem, such as housebreaking, is concerned.
SPORTS
December 11, 1989 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
Snowballs rained down, dangerously and persistently. Fights broke out in the stands. Several individuals ran onto the playing field and disrupted play. Dozens of customers invaded the sidelines in search of snow for ammunition. If anarchy did not reign in some sections of Veterans Stadium, it was chillingly close. And Eagles owner Norman Braman - who had as his guest at the game yesterday Paul Tagliabue, the NFL's new commissioner - was furious. "It's a disgrace," Braman said, after the Eagles' 20-10 victory over Dallas.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | By MARK MCDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
A day after the violent outbreak of looting in the East Market Street area during the parade for Julius Erving, some police and gang-control workers started talking to students about what went on. John White Sr., an assistant city managing director and head of the city's community intervention program, said he sent 18 community intervention workers in two-person teams into schools and public housing complexes to hold "rap sessions on these anti-social...
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | By Paul Bukovec
This month - Domestic Violence Awareness Month - the Commentary Page is featuring a series of essays by workers in the field of domestic abuse. In almost 16 years of counseling men who abuse their partners, I've been asked lots of questions about my clients. The thing people most frequently want to know is: Can these guys change? My answer is always an emphatic but qualified yes, because while I've witnessed many dramatic and inspiring conversions, the countervailing truth is that relatively very few abusive men actually come for help or stick with the grueling process.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Moreland High School seniors and their friends must leave their water balloons, beach balls, kazoos and water pistols at home when they don caps and gowns for their commencement ceremony Wednesday. Although they may toss their caps during the "graduation salute" at the end of commencement, no jeering or cat calling will be tolerated. The banned items and behavior are listed in a sternly worded letter to seniors and their parents from high school principal Robert H. Bubeck and assistant principals L. John DeLaurentis and Charles D. Cassady.
NEWS
December 12, 1986
A Dec. 3 article referred to a case of a battered woman who fatally shot her husband as he tried to hit her with a piece of pipe. During the five years of their marriage, she had suffered repeated physical abuse, which resulted in numerous injuries, including the loss of sight in one eye. The defense sought to introduce testimony on the "battered women's syndrome," which the judge did not allow. The story said that "the syndrome . . . can cause irrational behavior in a victim," in a sentence worded such that readers may have erroneously inferred that the woman's lawyer made such a statement.
LIVING
November 20, 1998 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Some people want to explore space, make a million dollars, or become a movie star. Malik, 9, wants stickers on his behavior chart - lots of them. He can earn them by speaking quietly in the house, staying in bed before 6:30 a.m., and dressing for school, eating and brushing his teeth with a pleasant attitude. The size of his allowance depends on the sticker pile-up. He likes to go shopping with his foster father, and will use some of his money to get a toy for his foster brother back home, too. Neglect and abuse are in Malik's background, and he receives therapy to help him deal with it. He takes medication for an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and for behavior management.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
An epidemic of coarse and obnoxious behavior is in full swing in the workplace. Examples are the boss who begins a meeting late, then takes phone calls while his subordinate sits and waits, and the co-worker who drains the last of the coffee and fails to start a fresh pot, according to Training magazine. Some advice for the civil-minded who find themselves confronted by obnoxious office behavior: Watch your language. Avoid vulgarities, sarcasm and dismissive responses like "whatever," which implies "I don't care.
SPORTS
May 18, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Chile's Marcelo Rios, the former world No. 1, has been fined $10,000 by the ATP for unsportsmanlike behavior at the players party during the Italian Open at Rome last week. The fine was the maximum under ATP rules. Rios became rowdy during the party and later went out on the town, allegedly attacking a taxi driver and two Carabinieri policemen, the ATP said. Italian officials said Rios had been drinking at the time. Rios was knocked out of both the Italian and German Opens in early rounds.
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NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care has leased 23,000 square feet at a Cherry Hill office park owned by an affiliate of Bala Cywnyd-based Endurance Real Estate. UBHC will operate an outpatient hospital at Colwyck Property's office park at 57 Haddonfield Rd., Markeim Chalmers vice president Scott Martin, who served as the health-care provider's broker, said Wednesday. UBHC's lease at the office park, in space previously occupied by the Internal Revenue Service, is worth $2.5 million over its initial five-year term, Martin said.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
SO MUCH OF personal finance is personal and emotional. During a recent online discussion, a reader asked a question about a situation that's all too common. And as part of a regular feature on family financial disagreements, I want to address the issues that the person raised. *  The background: This is a story about two brothers. Their parents have provided significant financial support for the children of the elder son. The parents are helping him pay his bills, because he is unemployed.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Stephen Weber saw an ad seeking participants to help determine whether online games could improve brain function, it was, well, a no-brainer. The Drexel senior would get paid for what sounded to him like playing Nintendo. Maybe it could even help him remedy his weakness in math, he thought. So he signed up for a University of Pennsylvania study on "the effects of Lumosity on brain activity and decision-making behavior. " There's much more at stake here than the fortunes of an industry whose revenue is expected to hit $6 billion a year by 2020.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
Every Sunday night after she steps out of her shower, 16-year-old Emma texts a nude selfie to her boyfriend. He has promised to destroy it within five minutes. Michael, 18, knows about the dangers of drinking and driving, but figures a couple of beers won't put him over the edge. After an evening of partying with friends, he tucks himself behind the wheel of the 1989 Honda Civic he borrowed from his brother. The police pick him up 30 minutes later for erratic driving. Alice, 14, who goes to a school for the academically talented, texts until 4 in the morning instead of studying for tomorrow's midterm science exam.
SPORTS
January 28, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE NFL, a moneymaking machine, is passing up a chance to rake in some extra cash. On Saturday, the head of officiating told ESPN's Sal Paolantonio that the Seahawks had been notified that they would be penalized 15 yards for unsportsmanlike conduct if running back Marshawn Lynch made any obscene gesture during the Sunday's Super Bowl. Lynch has been fined twice for grabbing his crotch after scoring a touchdown. In a truth-is-stranger-than-fiction report on ESPN.com, the NFL website store was, until very recently, selling a Seahawks collage of five photos that included a pic of Lynch grabbing something other than a football after scoring in the NFC Championship Game.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
A new year brings fresh resolutions. Lose weight, get more exercise, keep a neater house - wait, aren't those the same as last year's? And the year before that? Ninety percent of New Year's resolutions fail, even for people who are high achievers in other parts of their lives. That's why, on Jan. 1, lots of resolutions are, well, repeats. Sound familiar? "Part of the problem is the way resolutions are phrased," says Caroline Arnold, author of Small Move, Big Change: Using Microresolutions to Transform Your Life Permanently, a self-help book on effecting behavior change.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Einstein Healthcare Network has agreed to sell its Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment to Acadia Healthcare Co. for $35 million, Einstein announced Thursday. The planned sale includes the Belmont Center, a 147-bed facility on Monument Road, plus a treatment facility in Northeast Philadelphia and an outpatient center for the elderly in Germantown. Belmont behavioral-health facilities - treating psychiatric disorders and addictions, for example - employ 450, who are expected to be hired by Acadia, according to Einstein.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A HOMICIDE detective yesterday testified to some "bizarre" behavior by a murder suspect who was being questioned about his stepfather's shooting death in October. Detective Brian Peters testified that during questioning, James Kelly was acting childish, then "offered to fight me" and offered another detective $50 to fight. At one point, Kelly kept standing up and threw his fist into the air, as if punching, Peters demonstrated to Municipal Judge James DeLeon. Kelly, 23, is accused of killing his stepfather, Rafael Santiago, 41, in their home on Holly Road near Woodhaven in Northeast Philadelphia about noon Oct. 5. Peters, testifying at Kelly's preliminary hearing, said that when he went to the house about 4 p.m., he saw Santiago in a second-floor front bedroom, shot in the face.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
DO WE really have to lose "The Cosby Show"? Don't look here for a defense of Bill Cosby. I believed accuser Andrea Constand in 2005 and nothing that's happened in recent days has surprised me, much less changed my mind. I understood why NBC was finally ready to drop the idea of a new Cosby sitcom - it never seemed like a very good one, anyway - and why Netflix decided that Thanksgiving weekend might not be the right time to release a new Cosby special. I'm not sure, though, that TV Land needed to take the Huxtables off the air just because the man who brought them to life isn't the man he pretended to be. Because it's all pretend, you know.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
I T TOOK a few years of running a financial ministry at my church before I realized that the program needed to be revamped. Initially, I would have participants start with creating a budget. But by the time we got midway through the 10-month schedule, far too many people hadn't done theirs. So I spent one session probing why folks couldn't finish - or even start - their budgets. For the most part, it all came down to fear. One 50-year-old woman clarified it for me. "I'm ashamed," she said, shaking and choking back tears.
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