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Behavior

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NEWS
April 29, 2008
WAS IT only a week ago that we were the center of the universe? Now, all the camera lights, the 50 daily e-mails from Bill Clinton and the embarrassing behavior by the national media surrounding the Democratic primary have shifted to Indiana and North Carolina. We're relieved to have our city back. But the weeks leading up to last Tuesday's primary were good weeks for Philadlephia. We got the Colbert bump. On national TV, we watched our mayor being funny and our former mayor being even funnier.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
A gentle, non-punitive approach to improving dogs' behavior and a lucid text that any novice should be able to understand distinguish Everyday Dog: Training Your Dog to Be the Companion You Want by Nancy E. Johnson (Howell Book House, Macmillan Publishing, $17.95). Of the scores of dog-training, problem-solving books I've read, this is the first that offers different techniques for training puppies and adult canines, even when the same problem, such as housebreaking, is concerned.
SPORTS
December 11, 1989 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
Snowballs rained down, dangerously and persistently. Fights broke out in the stands. Several individuals ran onto the playing field and disrupted play. Dozens of customers invaded the sidelines in search of snow for ammunition. If anarchy did not reign in some sections of Veterans Stadium, it was chillingly close. And Eagles owner Norman Braman - who had as his guest at the game yesterday Paul Tagliabue, the NFL's new commissioner - was furious. "It's a disgrace," Braman said, after the Eagles' 20-10 victory over Dallas.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | By MARK MCDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
A day after the violent outbreak of looting in the East Market Street area during the parade for Julius Erving, some police and gang-control workers started talking to students about what went on. John White Sr., an assistant city managing director and head of the city's community intervention program, said he sent 18 community intervention workers in two-person teams into schools and public housing complexes to hold "rap sessions on these anti-social...
NEWS
October 30, 1999 | By Paul Bukovec
This month - Domestic Violence Awareness Month - the Commentary Page is featuring a series of essays by workers in the field of domestic abuse. In almost 16 years of counseling men who abuse their partners, I've been asked lots of questions about my clients. The thing people most frequently want to know is: Can these guys change? My answer is always an emphatic but qualified yes, because while I've witnessed many dramatic and inspiring conversions, the countervailing truth is that relatively very few abusive men actually come for help or stick with the grueling process.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Moreland High School seniors and their friends must leave their water balloons, beach balls, kazoos and water pistols at home when they don caps and gowns for their commencement ceremony Wednesday. Although they may toss their caps during the "graduation salute" at the end of commencement, no jeering or cat calling will be tolerated. The banned items and behavior are listed in a sternly worded letter to seniors and their parents from high school principal Robert H. Bubeck and assistant principals L. John DeLaurentis and Charles D. Cassady.
NEWS
December 12, 1986
A Dec. 3 article referred to a case of a battered woman who fatally shot her husband as he tried to hit her with a piece of pipe. During the five years of their marriage, she had suffered repeated physical abuse, which resulted in numerous injuries, including the loss of sight in one eye. The defense sought to introduce testimony on the "battered women's syndrome," which the judge did not allow. The story said that "the syndrome . . . can cause irrational behavior in a victim," in a sentence worded such that readers may have erroneously inferred that the woman's lawyer made such a statement.
LIVING
November 20, 1998 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
Some people want to explore space, make a million dollars, or become a movie star. Malik, 9, wants stickers on his behavior chart - lots of them. He can earn them by speaking quietly in the house, staying in bed before 6:30 a.m., and dressing for school, eating and brushing his teeth with a pleasant attitude. The size of his allowance depends on the sticker pile-up. He likes to go shopping with his foster father, and will use some of his money to get a toy for his foster brother back home, too. Neglect and abuse are in Malik's background, and he receives therapy to help him deal with it. He takes medication for an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and for behavior management.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
An epidemic of coarse and obnoxious behavior is in full swing in the workplace. Examples are the boss who begins a meeting late, then takes phone calls while his subordinate sits and waits, and the co-worker who drains the last of the coffee and fails to start a fresh pot, according to Training magazine. Some advice for the civil-minded who find themselves confronted by obnoxious office behavior: Watch your language. Avoid vulgarities, sarcasm and dismissive responses like "whatever," which implies "I don't care.
SPORTS
May 18, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Chile's Marcelo Rios, the former world No. 1, has been fined $10,000 by the ATP for unsportsmanlike behavior at the players party during the Italian Open at Rome last week. The fine was the maximum under ATP rules. Rios became rowdy during the party and later went out on the town, allegedly attacking a taxi driver and two Carabinieri policemen, the ATP said. Italian officials said Rios had been drinking at the time. Rios was knocked out of both the Italian and German Opens in early rounds.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I've been married for four years. After we said, "I do," my daughter started dating a guy of another race. It was then that I found out my husband is racist. He hates my daughter's boyfriend. He treats him poorly and talks very badly about him to get others to hate him, too. My daughter is now pregnant with her boyfriend's child, and my husband wants nothing to do with my daughter, her boyfriend, or the baby. I, however, love the boyfriend, and I'm very much looking forward to my first grandchild.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Jessica Parks, STAFF WRITER
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney released another round of appointments Friday morning, keeping three commissioners in their posts and tapping two new department heads. Those staying on in the new administration are Arthur C. Evans Jr., commissioner of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services; Thomas Conway, deputy managing director of the Community Life Improvement Program; and Bridget Collins-Greenwald, commissioner of Public Property. "Arthur, Tom and Bridget have provided strong leadership and oversight to their respective city departments.
NEWS
November 24, 2015
I WAS REALLY surprised to read John Smallwood's article on Donovan McNabb. I've enjoyed reading his columns since his arrival at the Daily News . His "Don the Con" article, however, sorely misses the mark. Reading about Donovan's DUI has saddened me. The first thing that struck me was that his recent behavior was so unlike the amazing athlete, family man and good citizen that we have come to know over the last 15 years. Smallwood's take is that McNabb is a phony. Whereas we see Allen Iverson with all his warts, McNabb hid his darker side so that he could get a job in broadcasting after his playing days were over.
SPORTS
September 17, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
As head football coach at Penn State, James Franklin supervises 125 players who are between the ages of 17 and 22, a group that he says may be "the most unpredictable group of people on the planet. " And what those players may do off the field worries Franklin to where it is something that "you lose the most sleep over," he said Tuesday at his weekly teleconference with the media. The scrutiny of college football players is intense. The coach said they can make mistakes like any other student, but "it doesn't get the same type of reaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm a few months pregnant and married to a man I love with all my heart. We have a young son together. For the past couple of months, I have had severe morning sickness, and my husband seems to resent me for it. He complains that I "don't do anything anymore," but I have been so ill that some days it's all I can do to get to work in the morning. I try to help out as much as I can, but it doesn't seem to be enough. Lately he has shown no interest in me or the pregnancy.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Weird as it seems, heartbeats may help predict who might become a criminal. A new study, which analyzed data from 710,000 men, found that those whose hearts beat unusually slowly when they were around 18 were 49 percent more likely to be convicted of violent crimes and 25 percent more likely to be convicted of nonviolent crimes as adults than those with the most rapid beats. Those whose hearts beat slowly were also at higher risk to become assault victims and to be injured in accidents.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matthew Lee, 29, a Ph.D. student from the University of Pennsylvania's nursing school, received a Fulbright Scholarship. His research focuses on how video games can be applied to therapeutic use. Lee, a Cerritos, Calif., native, previously was awarded an International Game Developers Association scholarship for his work with video games and mental health. He has eight years of experience in developing games and was trained as a game designer. In 2014, he founded game design studio AFK Studios, which was invited to the 2014 G-20 Global Business Challenge in Australia to talk about how video games could address global challenges with water-related issues.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care has leased 23,000 square feet at a Cherry Hill office park owned by an affiliate of Bala Cywnyd-based Endurance Real Estate. UBHC will operate an outpatient hospital at Colwyck Property's office park at 57 Haddonfield Rd., Markeim Chalmers vice president Scott Martin, who served as the health-care provider's broker, said Wednesday. UBHC's lease at the office park, in space previously occupied by the Internal Revenue Service, is worth $2.5 million over its initial five-year term, Martin said.
NEWS
June 12, 2015
SO MUCH OF personal finance is personal and emotional. During a recent online discussion, a reader asked a question about a situation that's all too common. And as part of a regular feature on family financial disagreements, I want to address the issues that the person raised. *  The background: This is a story about two brothers. Their parents have provided significant financial support for the children of the elder son. The parents are helping him pay his bills, because he is unemployed.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Stephen Weber saw an ad seeking participants to help determine whether online games could improve brain function, it was, well, a no-brainer. The Drexel senior would get paid for what sounded to him like playing Nintendo. Maybe it could even help him remedy his weakness in math, he thought. So he signed up for a University of Pennsylvania study on "the effects of Lumosity on brain activity and decision-making behavior. " There's much more at stake here than the fortunes of an industry whose revenue is expected to hit $6 billion a year by 2020.
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