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September 24, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Beijing's delegation reacted with dejection but little rancor yesterday when Sydney, Australia, was announced as the site of the 2000 Olympics in a victory for stability over political risk. "There is no loser," said Xu Fang, a member of Beijing's bid committee. "Sydney is a lucky city. We congratulate them. " Some 200 Chinese supporters who had come to Louis II Stadium in Monte Carlo, Monaco, quickly left, crestfallen, after the voting results were announced by IOC president Juan Antonio Samaranch.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In contemporary art, context is all. Marcel Duchamp proved that definitively by exhibiting an ordinary urinal and demanding that we regard it as sculpture rather than as a utilitarian bathroom fixture. The context of Frozen, which involves a fatalistic performance artist in contemporary China, is rather more elusive. This profoundly troubling and pseudonymously made (for political reasons) film focuses on a Beijing artist who carefully plans his final work: suicide. Not by pills or blade, but by ice. He contrives to bury himself under a block of ice and die of hypothermia.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb and Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writers
Far in the distance, across the vast, empty expanse of Tiananmen Square, workers in straw hats and blue suits got down on their hands and knees last week and scrubbed the Monument to the People's Heroes, as though a good cleaning would wash away the desecration of "counterrevolutionary" students and their movement for democracy. It could have easily been interpreted as a spruce-up campaign to hasten Beijing's return to normal - were it not for hundreds of soldiers standing guard at 20-yard intervals, each holding a submachine gun. At about the same time, members of the "exiled" American business community, as one U.S. diplomat put it, started receiving telegrams in Hong Kong from their Chinese partners, urging them to come back to China and pick up where they had left off. It could easily be interpreted as a make-up campaign to hasten an economic return to normal - were China not excoriating the United States for political interference, flooding the airwaves with draconian propaganda and ruthlessly cracking down on the pro-democracy movement.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | By Stephen Haven, FOR THE INQUIRER
- The best way to see this city is certainly by bicycle. On my second day in the city, my wife, who was born here, and my father- and brother-in-law took me down to the secondhand bicycle shop to pick up what would become my daily mode of transportation. They sighted down my bike, from rear to front wheel, the way a carpenter might eye a slightly warped 10-foot two-by-four. They shook it to test its strength, and rode it around the shop. To take it outside required a deposit equal to the full value of the bike.
NEWS
May 14, 2001 | JEFF JACOBY
NORMAL HUMAN beings would blanch at the thought of inviting athletes to compete at the site of an infamous massacre. But China's Communist rulers, who are bidding hard to host the Summer Olympics in 2008, are not normal human beings. So perhaps it should come as no surprise that they propose to hold the marathon, triathlon and cycling competitions in and around the site where the People's Liberation Army killed as many as 2,000 pro-democracy student demonstrators in June 1989: Tiananmen Square.
TRAVEL
October 9, 2011
BEIJING - It was a late-summer day, and the air was thick with the combination of humidity and smog particular to this capital city. Beijing is nestled in a bowl between the Xishan and Yanshan mountain ranges, creating a trap for the dense smog blowing in from the industrial zones to the southeast. We had just spent the morning trudging through the Forbidden City with virtually every other tourist in town. The palaces and presentation courts were grand and imposing and beautiful. But the throngs of people, coupled with that sticky air, made it difficult to appreciate the wonders before us. Leaving the grounds at the north end of the Forbidden City did not bring much relief.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A city rife with rumors of imminent bloody repression completed a second day under martial law as student-led protesters retained control of the central square and city streets this morning, while the Chinese army warned that its forces were moving into position to prevent sabotage of government buildings. As dawn broke today over the Forbidden City, just north of Tiananmen Square, the time of reckoning for hundreds of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators had yet to arrive.
NEWS
May 27, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
With conservatives in China's communist leadership resurgent and moderates on the defensive, a dwindling number of student demonstrators waited in Tiananmen Square yesterday for the final - and possibly bloody - act of their pro-democracy struggle to be played out. Under a wilting sun that drove the mercury into the 90s, many students began to drift from the square they first occupied on May 13. By day's end, only one bus of the 116 they had...
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
With most of China under a thick propaganda blanket, 19 university students took their seats in a classroom here yesterday morning and heard a lecture about one great man in history. His people were impoverished and discriminated against, and he led them to freedom. He rallied the masses with his words, inspired the masses with his deeds. His was a long struggle, but in the end he was victorious. His name, the students were told, was Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In a city still recovering from a massacre of students by army troops on June 4 in Tiananmen Square, the students' day began with a lesson on a champion of nonviolent resistance.
SPORTS
July 7, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Unlike her performance in yesterday's women's 1,500-meter final, Erin Donohue took her time savoring the race's aftermath. The Haddonfield native, who finished second in the event at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials to earn a trip to next month's Summer Olympics, was wide-eyed as she got her silver medal from Mary Decker Slaney, the American record holder in the 1,500. Donohue paused to sign autographs on the victory lap that she, winner Shannon Rowbury and third-place finisher Christin Wurth took around Hayward Field.
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SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WHEN WE first heard Stephon Marbury was starring in a musical in China titled "I Am Marbury," we briefly morphed into Tom McGinnis and let go with a lusty, "Are you kidding me?" The 37-year-old Marbury, it seems, is a megastar in China. Bigger than Jerry Lewis in France or David Hasselhoff in Germany. Heck, there's even a statue of the two-time NBA All-Star outside the MasterCard Center in Beijing where he led the Ducks to the Chinese Basketball Association title in March. The musical, which opened last night in Beijing and runs 11 days, is sold out for the first three shows.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Once again, as we have seen so frequently and so recently in many countries, massive crowds of young people are demonstrating for democracy against a repressive government. This time the civic protests are ongoing in downtown Hong Kong. As in Cairo's Tahrir Square in 2011, or in the early days of Syria's uprising, or last fall in Kiev, or in Moscow's Pushkin Square in 2012, the crowd is predominantly youthful and nonviolent - and it has no clear leaders. Its participants are so earnest that they clean up the trash and separate plastic and paper for recycling.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
BEIJING - The Philadelphia Orchestra's 2014 China Residency and Tour of Asia hit its stride Friday at the National Centre for the Performing Arts with a packed house that roared in response to a powerhouse performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 1 , clapping long and hard, and seeming doubly charmed when music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin turned to the audience and quietly said, "Xie xie" ("Thank you"). The Philadelphia players had gotten to know the hall's acoustics for a Mahler symphony that taps an orchestra to the max. One man confessed he was so moved that he had begun writing a rhapsodic letter to his fiancée to say how much he loved her. But while explaining this to Nézet-Séguin in the postconcert autograph line, he told the conductor, "I've also fallen in love with you!"
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
BEIJING - The Philadelphia Orchestra is used to veneration in China, but not like this. The orchestra was said to be "rewriting the history of our musical life" by Patrick Ren, executive director of programming at Beijing's National Centre for the Performing Arts. Facing a battery of TV cameras Thursday morning, he said, "Every time they walk on stage, they are in some way . . . creating a new epoch. " His comment indicates that Year Three of the Philadelphia Orchestra's five-year plan with the National Centre is anything but redundant.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
MOVIES MAY STOP production for any of a hundred reasons ("the script isn't ready," "we can't raise the money," "we've run out of money," etc.), but here's one you thankfully don't hear every day: The disaster movie "Deep Water," about a jet that crashes into the ocean on its way to Beijing, has been put on hold because of its similarities to the missing Malaysian plane, which disappeared on its way to . . . Beijing. Arclight Films said yesterday that preproduction has been halted for the time being.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Sochi, the Black Sea resort hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics, there are 24 varieties of palm trees. And if, for his entrance at Friday's opening ceremonies, some of their fronds were scattered at Vladimir Putin's feet, few would be surprised. Whether ultimately triumphal or tragic, the Sochi Games are Putin's miracle. The Russian leader, having overcome logistical, political, and historical hurdles to land his nation's first Winter Olympics, has become its face. "Has any Winter Olympic Games in history been so identified or attached to a national leader as these Games are to Mr. Putin?"
SPORTS
January 31, 2014 | Daily News staff and wire reports
A BRAZILIAN gymnast who was expected to compete in freestyle skiing at the Sochi Olympics is unable to move her arms or legs and can't breathe on her own after she hit a tree while skiing in Utah this week, doctors said yesterday. Lais Souza , 25, is fighting for her life and will miss the Olympics, Brazilian team doctor Antonio Marttos said at a news conference in Salt Lake City. She was injured Monday when she hit a tree while skiing recreationally in Park City, Utah, in an accident that doctors said could have happened to anybody.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When it comes to foreign policy, 2013 was a great year for autocrats and radical Islamists. For democracies and would-be democrats, the last 12 months were pretty grim. Mercifully, there are no global wars on the horizon. But in 2013 we began to see more clearly the shape of a world in which America leads from behind. The view isn't pretty. China, Russia, and Iran rushed to fill the power vacuum, with intentions that challenge U.S. values and long-term interests. Al-Qaeda founded a new emirate in Syria; the hopes of Arab Spring democrats were crushed and the borders of the post-World War I Middle East began to crumble.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I used to be afraid of China, but now I'm not anymore. " That's Paula Marantz Cohen's mother-in-law. She'd just seen Cohen's documentary Two Universities and the Future of China , airing on WHYY's Y Info channel on Saturday and Sunday. Cohen, professor of English at Drexel University, says, "That's the best reaction I could have hoped for. " A 2008 visit to China struck Cohen "with the energy and possibilities of this vast country. " After two years of writing, calling, and visits to the Chinese embassy in Washington, Cohen returned in 2010 for a scouting visit for a film.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Didi Tang, Associated Press
BEIJING - A man in a wheelchair who was airing grievances set off a homemade bomb in a crowded terminal at Beijing's main airport on Saturday evening, injuring himself but no one else, Chinese state media and witnesses said. Order was quickly restored, and no flights were affected by the explosion at the airport's main international terminal, state-run China Central Television said on its microblog. The official Xinhua news agency said the man set off the device outside the arrivals exit of Terminal 3 at Beijing Capital International Airport around 6:24 p.m. It said that he was being treated for injuries, but that no one else was hurt in the explosion.
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