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NEWS
January 19, 1986 | Associated Press
BLACK SMOKE BILLOWS from the seaside neighborhood in Beirut where Elie Hobeika's Lebanese Forces have been based. During bloody fighting Wednesday, Hobeika's forces were ousted from most of their positions in and around Beirut by rival Christian forces loyal to President Amin Gemayel. At least 120 were killed in the day-long battle.
NEWS
July 31, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
On October 30, 1986, Lt. Col. Oliver North helicoptered into Beirut on a doomed mission to free the six Americans then held hostage in Lebanon by Shiite militants. Three days later the administration's sale of arms to Iran in exchange for hostages was revealed. Only later would the full story be told how North and other members of the National Security Council and an assortment of arms dealers and international middlemen tried to use profits from the Iran arms sale to fund Contra rebels battling the Nicaraguan government.
NEWS
March 25, 1987
At his press conference last week, President Reagan declared, "I happen to believe that when an American citizen, any place in the world, is unjustly denied their constitutional rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, it is the responsibility of this government to restore those rights. " He might have added, for the sake of honesty, that the government also has a responsibility to stand firm against terrorists' unacceptable demands and that that higher responsibility makes it impossible to help the eight American hostages in Beirut.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
"Golfing in Beirut," a multi-media revue written by Jimmy Clark, Richard DiDio, Gary Grissom and Peter Muller, and directed by Michael Ladenson. Films directed and edited by Michael Bailey. Presented by The No Respect for the Human Condition Players and DMK Productions, Inc., at the Walnut Theatre 5, 9th and Walnut streets, Wed.-Sun. through Feb. 16. Let us credit The No Respect for the Human Condition Players for sustaining a certain grace under fire. Not only was their original title, "Teachers in Space," wiped out by the dire events of last week at Cape Canaveral, but a good portion of their current topical revue as well.
NEWS
August 8, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Business travel is second nature to lawyer Murray Levin, but his recent trip to an international lawyers' meeting in Lebanon was a first for him. "It was a unique experience from a lot of points of view," said Levin (pronounced le-VIN), who lives in Wynnewood and is a partner with the Philadelphia law firm Pepper Hamilton. Although several Americans were scheduled to attend the meeting of the Union Internationale des Avocats in late June in Beirut, Levin said he was the only one to show up. As such, he served as a lightning rod for many of his colleagues' opinions about the United States.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
The kidnappings of two West Germans in Beirut were planned by the brother of the Lebanese man accused in the 1985 hijacking of a TWA flight, a radio station reported last night. Meanwhile, the government confirmed that officials were willing to talk with the kidnappers, who apparently seized the men to stop West Germany from going through with its plans to extradite Mohammed Ali Hamadi to the United States to face murder and air piracy charges. In his first public comment on the crisis, Chancellor Helmut Kohl said: "We are in the process of building up lines of contact, lines of negotiation.
NEWS
June 11, 1991 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The last time Antoine Nader saw Martyrs Square, the heart of old Beirut, he was looking at it down the barrel of a gun. That was 13 years ago, when Nader was a Christian militiaman. Now he's a middle-aged engineer, taking aim at the square through the viewfinder on his video camera. Wearing plaid Bermuda shorts and a golf-club T-shirt, he was giving his wife and young son a tour of his old battleground. "This used to be a symbol of all Lebanon," Nader said, regarding the devastation around him. "I guess it still is. " Martyrs Square, symbol of all Lebanon, is in smithereens.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Gunmen in a speeding car today killed a Frenchman as he drove his own automobile in a residential neighborhood of Christian east Beirut, radio stations reported. The Voice of Lebanon identified the victim as Jacques Moran. The station, based in east Beirut and run by Christian militiamen who control the streets of that sector, did not give other information about the victim. It said three gunmen in a blue Peugeot fired at Moran with a silencer- equipped weapon. He was hit by three bullets.
NEWS
May 10, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Rival Shiite Moslem militias took advantage of a lull in fighting today to fortify their positions or bring in reinforcements, after fierce battles that killed 65 people and wounded 50 yesterday. The fighting, which had simmered down to sporadic gunfire by this morning, has killed 154 people and wounded 367 since it broke out Friday. Police said no casualties were reported overnight from the confrontations in the slums of south Beirut. Police said 36 Syrian officers moved into the area with six committees in an effort to implement a truce in fighting between the pro-Syrian Amal militia and the Iranian-backed Hezbollah, or Party of God. The battle for control of Beirut's southern slums, where an estimated 250,000 Shiites live, raised fears about the fate of 18 foreign hostages.
NEWS
September 13, 1986 | By JOHN C. WHITE, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Cicippio, 56, youngest of nine children in a Norristown family, was not in strife-torn Beirut trying to be a hero. If anything, you might say he was an just an average Joe who loved a challenge and wanted to do a good job. Cicippio, who became the latest American abducted in strife-torn Beirut, began working for the American University three years ago. Although his family and friends in Norristown said yesterday they were saddened by...
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NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Barbara Surk, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - With the Syrian civil war edging closer to Damascus, the capital's business elite long cultivated by President Bashar al-Assad as a support for his regime is starting to join the exodus from the country. Popular restaurants and high-end stores in Damascus have shut down as their owners move to Beirut and reopen there. They become the latest part of the flight of the Syrian upper class, thousands of whom are believed to have moved abroad over the last year, mainly to Lebanon, Turkey, and the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
BEER FROM LEBANON? Baloney! Sorry, this Pennsylvania boy couldn't let that pun slip by, even if - as it happens - we're talking about beer made not in central Pennsylvania, but in the Middle East. Still, I say, baloney! Beer from the Muslim world is a non sequitur , as alien as two all-beef patties on a sesame-seed bun would be in the kitchen of my vegan colleague Vance Lehmkuhl. It just ain't gonna happen, right? Not when Islamic militants last year began blowing up liquor stores in southern Lebanon.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
MASNAA, Lebanon - Key Syrian ally Russia began evacuating its citizens from the country on Tuesday as the civil war gathered momentum in the capital Damascus with intense fighting around the international airport. The evacuation was the strongest sign yet of Moscow's waning confidence in the ability of its ally President Bashar al-Assad to hold onto power. The U.N. chief said Tuesday that a diplomatic conclusion to the war seems unlikely. U.S. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said the Russian evacuations indicate "the continued deterioration of the security situation and the violence that Assad is leading against his own people.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | THE WASHINGTON POST
BEIRUT - The diplomatic push to end the fighting in Syria gained new momentum Thursday as a top U.N. official endorsed the formation of a transitional government and Russia signaled that it might be prepared to pressure President Bashar Assad's regime to negotiate. The outlines of any possible breakthrough remain vague, but recent statements by diplomats in Beirut, in Moscow and at the United Nations underline a sense that substantive negotiations could still take place. At the same time, there are emerging fears that the prospects for a negotiated settlement may slip away, as high-level defections from the Syrian government and rebel military successes embolden the opposition to fight to victory.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Bassem Mroue, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Jennifer Shedid had just arrived home from school and was hungry. As she asked her older sister what she could eat, a massive explosion shook their block and turned the glass of their fourth-floor apartment into flying knives that slashed 10-year-old Jennifer from head to toe. Their father, Richard, was climbing the stairs to the apartment on his way back from buying bread for the family when the car bomb struck Friday afternoon less...
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Trudy Rubin, reporting from Beirut, blogs about the massacre in Syria. Excerpt, A10. Read her blog at www.philly.com/ TrudyRubin
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since its official start in 2006, the mixed bag of music that is Beirut has been tagged a one-man band. Surely that comes down to the fact that the genre-hopping, oompah-cabaret compositions of Beirut come from a singular font: Zach Condon. His big voice, tenderly quixotic lyrics, and idealistic mash of Mexican, Eastern European, and indie-punk noise have been the often hyped front and center of 2006's Gulag Orkestar, 2007's The Flying Club Cup , and 2011's The Rip Tide. But Paul Collins, Beirut bassist and bouzouki, is living proof that this band is not just one person.
FOOD
August 18, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the sound of the air conditioner chugging away in the window, Imad Chehab lets out a longing "ahhh" as his friend reminisces about a sweetened drink made with dried apricots. It is just past 7 p.m., about one hour until sundown and more than 13 hours since the first rays of sunlight began to appear in the morning sky, which was the last time Chehab and his companion ate. Moments earlier, Chehab, 47, had explained quite forcefully that Ramadan was not about food but about discipline and getting oneself closer to God. But now the thought of childhood treats seemed to get the better of him. "The drink, they sell it on the streets in Beirut," the software engineer explains.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vahaken Tachdjian, 90, of Wynnewood, a retired gastroenterologist and an activist in the Armenian community, died of complications of a stroke Saturday, June 11, at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Tachdjian's grandparents were killed in the massacre of Armenians in Turkey in the early 20th century. In 1922, his parents fled Turkey with their year-old son and walked across the Syrian desert to Lebanon. Raised and educated in Beirut, Dr. Tachdjian immigrated to the United States with his wife in 1958 to escape unrest in the Middle East.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2011 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
If you think all Middle Eastern cuisine is the same, then a trip to the 4-week-old Manakeesh Cafe Bakery will dispel that myth. Actually, there are regional differences and influences. When physician Wissam Chatila set about opening a bakery and cafe at 45th and Walnut, in University City, it evolved into a taste of his native Beirut - a blend of European cuisine and spices from the Middle East. General Manager Abd Ghazzawi grew up around the corner from the rehabbed bank building that houses Manakeesh.
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