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Believers

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NEWS
May 31, 1988 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Editorial Board
The workmen had to rush to finish repainting the gold onion domes of the Danilov Monastery for President Reagan's visit, ensuring that the one-time boys' reform school will be back in business for this June's celebration of the millenium of Christianity in this land. While the 13th-century monastery indeed makes a gorgeous television backdrop, the real meaning of its resurrection is that Mikhail S. Gorbachev is wooing the Christian vote. Or, to be more precise, he recognizes that if he wants to mobilize support for his economic reforms, there is a constituency of tens of millions of silent believers who could be won over by a more tolerant policy toward religion.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer staff writers Rick Lyman in New York and Bridgett M. Davis in Philadelphia contributed to this article.)
So, after 5,125 years, the ancient Aztec calendar ended yesterday, and, as predicted, the sun god Quetzalcoatl appeared. He was wearing a brown cardigan sweater, and he drove in from Missoula Mont., in a Ford Escort station wagon. It was a less dramatic entrance than might have been expected at the end of the old age and the dawn of the new. In fact, most of the 5,000 or so mellow meditators who came to this "power point" for the epochal Harmonic Convergence missed it. They were up before dawn, perched on rocks and wrapped in blankets facing the east, serenaded by drums and the muted lowing of nearby chanters.
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | By Crispin Sartwell
The other day my wife attended a funeral of an acquaintance who had committed suicide. The minister who preached the funeral sermon recounted the story of a period of despair in her own life, when she had thought about killing herself. But God intervened, she said, and saved her. I suppose the man she was burying wasn't good enough to be saved by God, or perhaps it just wasn't God's whim to stop him from blowing his brains out. As the various interpreters of God's will appear and crash airliners into buildings, or on the contrary assert that God frowns on people crashing airlines into buildings, or that God will help our blessed nation in its quest for Osama, or that God will help Osama to escape, one might ask again an epochal question: Huh?
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By John Allen Paulos
Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Countless people over the ages have at least briefly considered this question, and the issue is not without relevance today. Certainly the chasms separating literal believers, moderate believers and nonbelievers are deep. There are many who seem content to believe God exists simply because he says he does in a much extolled tome that he allegedly inspired. Many others subscribe with varying degrees of fervor to more sophisticated arguments for God, while atheists and agnostics find none of the arguments persuasive.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
At the Catholic Church of SS. Cosmas and Damian in Conshohocken, a festival Sunday drew parishioners and a large group from New York. Above, believers pin dollars on statues. At right, Carly Cadet (left) and Tricia Louis win fish.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Wayne Courtney Balen, 24, a 1983 honors graduate of Conestoga High School who as a senior won an award for wrestling, died of cancer Sept. 18 at his parents' home in Devon. He was born in Wayne. He had lived in Raleigh, N.C., for several years and had returned to his parents' home in May. Mr. Balen earned varsity letters in wrestling for three years at Conestoga. In his senior year, he received the Mo Lear Award, given to the school's most skilled wrestler. He had also played varsity soccer at Conestoga.
NEWS
August 21, 1986
It's little wonder belief and science have become thoroughly confused in this Age of Reagan. The president himself seems to live in a happy little land where there is no distinction between the two to disturb even his most crack- brained certainties. It's gotten so bad, in fact, that even six dozen Nobel laureates may not make much difference. That's how many United States winners of the Nobel Prize (along with 24 prominent scientific organizations) have urged the Supreme Court to overturn a Louisiana law that requires public schools to teach what some people call "creation science.
SPORTS
December 21, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Minutes after the Phillies traded the longest-tenured athlete in Philadelphia, the man who inherited that title said farewell in the form of a written statement distributed by the Phillies. And, no, Chase Utley did not request to join Jimmy Rollins in Los Angeles. "The Dodgers are very lucky to acquire a player like Jimmy," Utley said. "I've said it time and time again that Jimmy makes everyone around him better. The team will miss his leadership on the field and his infectious smile, but most of all, I will miss our pregame handshake.
SPORTS
November 9, 1995 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In front of cameras, relatives, teammates and coaches, University City basketball star Shawnetta Stewart made it official yesterday, signing a letter of intent to attend Rutgers next year. As her news conference began in a UC conference room, the 5-foot-10 guard and forward looked so low-key, dressed in jeans, big work boots and a navy windbreaker. Gold glitter in her hair was the only hint of celebration. Then she stripped off her jacket to reveal a scarlet Rutgers basketball jersey with No. 34, the same number Charles Barkley wears.
NEWS
September 14, 2006
DURING THE recent election for the board of directors of the Philadelphia Masjid, the Daily News made several disturbing statements in headlines accompanying stories: "Ali's influence on line" (July 31). "Philadelphia Mosque votes to oust Ali. " "Ali's 30-year reign is over. " "Ali ruled the mosque with an iron fist. " "Ali used his religious position to wheel and deal in the city with pols and drug dealers" (Aug. 7). The Daily News did not understand what the election was about - it was an election to determine the board of directors of the Philadelphia Masjid.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was known variously as Alice, Alice of Dunk's Ferry, Black Alice, or Old Alice. She was a slave who lived at least 108 years - some say 116 - and saw three centuries. She never learned how to read or write, and never gained her freedom, but her head was filled with priceless memories. Alice could tell a story like no one else - whether it was about meeting William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania; witnessing the early days of Philadelphia; or navigating boats between Dunk's Ferry - now Beverly - and what is now Bensalem.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Susan Snyder, and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
One minute they were husbands and wives, students and professionals, lost in cellphone chatter, the glow of iPads, the rhythm of a passenger train charging through Philadelphia on a spring night at more than 100 m.p.h. The next moment they were being hurled into overhead luggage racks, slammed into windows, even stripped of their shoes as Amtrak Train 188 flew off its tracks and came to a screaming, horrific, halt. It was, according to survivors of the deadliest Northeast Corridor rail crash in a generation, a scene of such sudden destruction they could hardly believe they had witnessed it - let alone walked away.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN TATTLE mentioned a couple of days ago that Tim McGraw had announced The Concert for Sandy Hook Promise, with proceeds benefiting an organization with the crazy, un-American goal of protecting kids from guns, we wondered how that might play with a portion of his fans. Uh, not well. The Washington Post reports that McGraw (along with his openers , Billy Currington and Chase Bryant ) have received a backlash from gun-rights advocates. Tim's motives seem reasonable.
SPORTS
March 28, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were more ex-Eagles than current Eagles at Todd Herremans' third annual Hoops 4 Hope fund raiser Thursday night at Vie Restaurant. A month ago, LeSean McCoy, Jeremy Maclin, Trent Cole and Herremans were four of the more notable Eagles and accounted for a combined 32 seasons in Philadelphia. But after a flurry of moves and decisions from Chip Kelly that had McCoy dealt to the Bills, Maclin choosing the Chiefs, Cole and Herremans released and eventually signed by the Colts, and Nick Foles traded to the Rams, the Eagles took on a dramatically different look in a matter of weeks.
SPORTS
February 26, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - There's not a player or coach in Phillies camp, Ben Davis said, who does not think the team can be successful this season despite being widely predicted to finish last in the National League. "Baseball players are just built differently," said Davis, who is entering his first season as one of the team's broadcasters. The former second overall draft pick from Malvern Prep makes his broadcast debut March 3 when the Phillies host the New York Yankees in the Grapefruit League opener.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anchorman's daughter speaks Many a viewer's faith in Brian Williams has been broken in the wake of Helicoptergate. But his daughter, Girls star Allison , stands by the NBC Nightly News anchorman. "One thing the experience has not done is shake my trust and belief in him as a man," she told Seth Meyers at an event Wednesday night in New York. Williams, who starred as Peter Pan in the recent NBC live teleplay, has made one concession to current events: She's delayed her wedding to producer Ricky Van Veen . But it will happen.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
THOUGH SOME believe the Rev. Keith Goodman's bid to become mayor will fail because he doesn't meet the residency requirement, he has at least one prominent Philadelphian speaking up for him. Former Mayor John F. Street, now an adjunct professor at Temple University, this week proclaimed Goodman's candidacy to be good by him. "Under a liberal interpretation of the applicable provisions of Pennsylvania and municipal election law - which I...
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Biddle, the champion offshore powerboat racer from Egg Harbor Township who emerged this week to face criminal charges after vanishing nearly seven months ago, remained a free man Friday after posting $50,000 bail, his lawyer said. Biddle, 45, was declared missing last July after a boating accident. Though some who knew him feared he was dead, local authorities soon came to believe he orchestrated the accident to avoid fraud charges stemming from the boat-sales company where he worked.
NEWS
February 10, 2015
A COLUMN that starts by quoting Voltaire is likely to get serious. So here goes. The 18th-century French philosopher is credited with saying, "Faith consists in believing what reason cannot. " Well, Gov. Wolf is asking for serious amounts of faith. And doing so despite what reason (and experience) tells us about Pennsylvania, Land of Low Expectations. This underpins his actions and agenda. It might be his greatest challenge. Can he make us believe? Last week, he announced a new Governor's Office of Transformation, Innovation, Management and Efficiency to save tax dollars and improve government.
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