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NEWS
May 31, 1988 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Editorial Board
The workmen had to rush to finish repainting the gold onion domes of the Danilov Monastery for President Reagan's visit, ensuring that the one-time boys' reform school will be back in business for this June's celebration of the millenium of Christianity in this land. While the 13th-century monastery indeed makes a gorgeous television backdrop, the real meaning of its resurrection is that Mikhail S. Gorbachev is wooing the Christian vote. Or, to be more precise, he recognizes that if he wants to mobilize support for his economic reforms, there is a constituency of tens of millions of silent believers who could be won over by a more tolerant policy toward religion.
NEWS
August 17, 1987 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer staff writers Rick Lyman in New York and Bridgett M. Davis in Philadelphia contributed to this article.)
So, after 5,125 years, the ancient Aztec calendar ended yesterday, and, as predicted, the sun god Quetzalcoatl appeared. He was wearing a brown cardigan sweater, and he drove in from Missoula Mont., in a Ford Escort station wagon. It was a less dramatic entrance than might have been expected at the end of the old age and the dawn of the new. In fact, most of the 5,000 or so mellow meditators who came to this "power point" for the epochal Harmonic Convergence missed it. They were up before dawn, perched on rocks and wrapped in blankets facing the east, serenaded by drums and the muted lowing of nearby chanters.
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | By Crispin Sartwell
The other day my wife attended a funeral of an acquaintance who had committed suicide. The minister who preached the funeral sermon recounted the story of a period of despair in her own life, when she had thought about killing herself. But God intervened, she said, and saved her. I suppose the man she was burying wasn't good enough to be saved by God, or perhaps it just wasn't God's whim to stop him from blowing his brains out. As the various interpreters of God's will appear and crash airliners into buildings, or on the contrary assert that God frowns on people crashing airlines into buildings, or that God will help our blessed nation in its quest for Osama, or that God will help Osama to escape, one might ask again an epochal question: Huh?
NEWS
March 9, 2008 | By John Allen Paulos
Are there any logical reasons to believe in God? Countless people over the ages have at least briefly considered this question, and the issue is not without relevance today. Certainly the chasms separating literal believers, moderate believers and nonbelievers are deep. There are many who seem content to believe God exists simply because he says he does in a much extolled tome that he allegedly inspired. Many others subscribe with varying degrees of fervor to more sophisticated arguments for God, while atheists and agnostics find none of the arguments persuasive.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | For The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
At the Catholic Church of SS. Cosmas and Damian in Conshohocken, a festival Sunday drew parishioners and a large group from New York. Above, believers pin dollars on statues. At right, Carly Cadet (left) and Tricia Louis win fish.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Wayne Courtney Balen, 24, a 1983 honors graduate of Conestoga High School who as a senior won an award for wrestling, died of cancer Sept. 18 at his parents' home in Devon. He was born in Wayne. He had lived in Raleigh, N.C., for several years and had returned to his parents' home in May. Mr. Balen earned varsity letters in wrestling for three years at Conestoga. In his senior year, he received the Mo Lear Award, given to the school's most skilled wrestler. He had also played varsity soccer at Conestoga.
NEWS
August 21, 1986
It's little wonder belief and science have become thoroughly confused in this Age of Reagan. The president himself seems to live in a happy little land where there is no distinction between the two to disturb even his most crack- brained certainties. It's gotten so bad, in fact, that even six dozen Nobel laureates may not make much difference. That's how many United States winners of the Nobel Prize (along with 24 prominent scientific organizations) have urged the Supreme Court to overturn a Louisiana law that requires public schools to teach what some people call "creation science.
NEWS
December 11, 2015
PEOPLE LIKE to to treat this year's budget fiasco in Harrisburg as the same-old-same-old, a typical partisan squabble where each side tries to score points over the other. There are partisan games going on this year and passing any budget with tax increases is a nightmare. This year is different, and not only because this particular budget fight has lasted into December. It is also different because it reveals the change in the culture in Harrisburg. To oversimplify, there are two groups in the state capital - the politicians who believe in government and those who do not. So far, the "Do Not's" have been in control of the process.
SPORTS
December 21, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Minutes after the Phillies traded the longest-tenured athlete in Philadelphia, the man who inherited that title said farewell in the form of a written statement distributed by the Phillies. And, no, Chase Utley did not request to join Jimmy Rollins in Los Angeles. "The Dodgers are very lucky to acquire a player like Jimmy," Utley said. "I've said it time and time again that Jimmy makes everyone around him better. The team will miss his leadership on the field and his infectious smile, but most of all, I will miss our pregame handshake.
SPORTS
November 9, 1995 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In front of cameras, relatives, teammates and coaches, University City basketball star Shawnetta Stewart made it official yesterday, signing a letter of intent to attend Rutgers next year. As her news conference began in a UC conference room, the 5-foot-10 guard and forward looked so low-key, dressed in jeans, big work boots and a navy windbreaker. Gold glitter in her hair was the only hint of celebration. Then she stripped off her jacket to reveal a scarlet Rutgers basketball jersey with No. 34, the same number Charles Barkley wears.
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SPORTS
September 20, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
The Phillies had intended to use this weekend as the beginning of a farewell for Ryan Howard, whose time with the only franchise he's ever known had dwindled to mere weeks. Instead, Howard had his bothersome left knee drained Sunday. The team believes Howard can play again this season, Phillies manager Pete Mackanin said, and they are hopeful he is healthy enough to return by Tuesday. The Phillies are off Monday; they have five remaining games at Citizens Bank Park that bookend a seven-game road trip.
SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Paul Domowitch, STAFF WRITER
In 2007, the New England Patriots were only the second team in NFL history to run the table in the regular season, going 16-0. Their offense was unstoppable. They averaged a then-NFL-record 36.8 points per game. Their average margin of victory was 19.7 points. And then they ran into the New York Giants in Super Bowl XLII and lost, 17-14. They lost because the Giants' defense spent most of the game making quarterback Tom Brady's life miserable. They were constantly in his face and moving him off his throwing spot.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia accepted the Democratic nomination for vice president Wednesday night, introducing himself to a national audience as a Jesuit-educated former missionary and governor who trusts Hillary Clinton with his Marine son's life. And Kaine also debuted in the traditional running-mate role of attack dog, mocking Republican Donald Trump's signature phrase, "Believe me," as a tipoff to the lies of a detail-free campaign. "He says, 'Believe me.' Well, his creditors, his contractors, his laid-off employees, his ripped-off students did just that," Kaine said.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna and Daniel Block, STAFF WRITERS
SCRANTON - Barely acknowledging the criticism of his latest controversial remarks, Donald Trump used a rally here to intensify his attacks on Hillary Clinton and try to blunt any convention bounce coming her way. Speaking to a few thousand supporters who packed a college gymnasium a few hours north of Philadelphia, the Republican presidential nominee dismissed the tenor of the Democrats' convention and the portrayals of their nominee. Trump said he had no objection to a woman president but called Clinton "a disaster" who would set back women "a long way. " He also laughed off descriptions of her as "change maker," the term her husband had used Tuesday night in his effusive keynote address . The Democrats "probably paid $2 million" to the creator of that slogan, Trump quipped.
NEWS
July 28, 2016
By Luke Zubrod The American ideal is not only about economic opportunity. We are the "shining city on a hill" because of our remarkable history of protecting the oppressed. Such moments have been America's finest hours - those that made us truly great. The Republican Party - Abraham Lincoln's party - has long been a worthy steward of this heritage. In his presidential nominating speech in 1880, with memories of the Civil War still fresh, James Garfield articulated the party's most storied contribution to this cause.
SPORTS
July 7, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
THERE'S AT LEAST one good reason to buy ESPN The Magazine's "Body Issue" beyond the nude figure of corpulent cover model Vince Wilfork. Dwyane Wade, Greg Louganis and Elena Delle Donne might create more buzz, but when the mag drops today it will feature something even more titillating to HoopsNerds: a profile of Sam Hinkie. The piece is built on rare, on-the-record interviews conducted with Hinkie in March - four months after Jerry Colangelo supplanted him atop the Sixers organization; a month before Hinkie resigned; and a little more than a month before Colangelo hired his son, Bryan, to run the team.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
A week after a small black bear was seen swimming in the Wissahickon Creek in Fairmount Park, is it safe to go into the park? Wildlife Conservation Officer Jerry Czech, of the Pennsylvania Game Commission, says yes. "We didn't tell people to stay out of the woods when it was spotted," Czech said Friday. "It would be perfectly safe to go about your business," he said. "With the amount of people in that park ... it's probably not there. " Czech said he believes the bear spotted May 13 near the Valley Green Inn, by Forbidden Drive and Valley Green Road, was the same bear later seen in Tredyffrin Township, Chester County, on Sunday.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | Staff Report, From Staff and Wire Reports
The manhunt for an escaped prison inmate in Barnegat Township, N.J., was scaled back Thursday afternoon after state investigators determined that he was no longer in the area. Schools in the Pinelands community were placed on lockdown Wednesday, and residents were urged to lock their homes and cars, after Arthur Buckel, 38, was seen at a CVS store in the Ocean County town. Buckel escaped from Bayside State Prison's satellite unit at Ancora Psychiatric Hospital in Winslow, Camden County, between 4 and 6 a.m. Tuesday.
SPORTS
April 18, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Columnist
W hen Jordan Burroughs looked at his name high on the wall of the gymnasium, he also saw two numbers. One was his career wins: 115. One was his career losses: 20. Back at Winslow Township High School for an informal meet-and-greet on Tuesday night, Burroughs joked about his victory total, which places him about 175th on South Jersey's all-time list. "I thought I had more," Burroughs said with a smile. But it's the other number that underlines the lesson that Burroughs' astounding post-high school success provides for other wrestlers, and for athletes in other sports.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By John Baer
LET'S TAKE a peek at the race for attorney general. It's overshadowed by contests for president and U.S. Senate. But it offers insights into Pennsylvania's geopolitics and Philadelphia's clout. Also, it's about an office that's both stepping-stone and banana peel. Of the five elected A.G.s since 1980 (previously, the post was appointed), three ran for governor (Ernie Preate, Mike Fisher, and Tom Corbett); one, Corbett, became governor; and two were charged with crimes. Preate went to prison; current A.G. Kathleen Kane awaits trial.
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