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BUSINESS
October 1, 2005 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boeing Co., Bell Helicopter and the National Journal magazine apologized yesterday to an Islamic advocacy group for creating and publishing an ad for the Osprey depicting American troops descending from the aircraft above a mosque. "It descends from the heavens. Ironically it unleashes hell," the ad's headline read. The ad copy also said: "The CV-22 delivers Special Forces to insertion points never thought possible. " The Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, asked Boeing, Bell Helicopter, and its parent Textron Inc. on Thursday to pull the ad for the CV-22 Osprey, an airplane with rotors that tilt so it can maneuver like a helicopter.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Triumph Group Inc., of Wayne, says it has agreed to buy General Donlee Canada Inc., a manufacturer of precision-machined parts, such as shafts for aircraft engines and helicopters for GE Aviation, Bell Helicopter and others, for $110 million, including an unspecified amount of debt. General Donlee, which is based in Toronto and employs 200, is expected to add $60 million in annual revenue and immediately add to earnings. Triumph Group had $3.76 billion in revenue in its most recent fiscal year.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL VIOLA
Yesterday morning, the body of the first nonexperimental tilt-rotor aircraft was placed on an Air Force C-5A Galaxy transport plane at Philadelphia International Airport and flown to Fort Worth, Texas. There, the fuselage and tail section of the V-22 Osprey, which takes off vertically like a helicopter, then tilts its rotors forward to fly at the speed of a plane, will be mated with the wing and nacelle. The body was built at the Boeing Helicopter Co. in Ridley Township, the wing and nacelle by its partner in the venture, Bell Helicopter Co. of Arlington, Texas.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
John D. Silva, 92, the Los Angeles television engineer who won Emmy Awards for creating helicopter news coverage in 1958 has died in Southern California. Mr. Silva's family told the Los Angeles Times that he died Nov. 27 of pneumonia complications in Camarillo. Mr. Silva was the chief engineer for KTLA-TV when he outfitted a rented Bell helicopter with a TV camera to create a flying TV studio. The station broadcast live aerial coverage of major news events, including earthquakes, fires, and freeway calamities.
NEWS
February 8, 1995 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plans by the Philadelphia Police Department to launch a $13 million fleet of helicopters have been stalled by accusations of collusion and favoritism leveled against two state agencies involved in the bidding process. Charles Tocci, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania State Police, said yesterday that the awarding of a contract for the three helicopters that will be lent to the Philadelphia Police Department has been delayed pending the outcome of a suit now in Commonwealth Court.
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes saving a few bucks can be costly . . . like a few million dollars costly. That's just what appears to have happened with bids submitted to Philadelphia city officials last week for the purchase of helicopters for the Police Department. A bid submitted by Bell Helicopter has been thrown out, according to Procurement Commissioner Louis Applebaum, because a $200 deposit check submitted with the bid was not certified, but written on a regular company bank account. Applebaum said that because the bid specifications clearly stated that a certified check was required, city officials had no choice but to throw out the bid for a contract that could be valued at approximately $4.5 million.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rendell administration yesterday decided to postpone a decision on awarding a contract for police helicopters the city wants to use to track suspects and reduce car chases. The apparent low bidder for the two or three helicopters, American Eurocopter Corp. with a $1,445,000 bid per helicopter, proposed to build the choppers in France, which required a recalculation of the bid under state law. The recalculation made them the high bidder, according to David L. Cohen, Mayor Rendell's chief of staff.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Boeing Co. yesterday named Charles H. Allen, who fought with the Marines in Desert Storm, as vice president and general manager of its Rotorcraft Systems Division in Ridley Township. Allen is moving here from a Boeing integrated-defense systems assignment in Huntsville, Ala., to succeed Mike Tkach, who has retired. Allen will direct operations at the Philadelphia suburbs site, which employs 4,800 people, and at Boeing's Apache Helicopter program in Mesa, Ariz. Rotorcraft Systems is part of Boeing Precision Engagement and Mobility Systems, based in St. Louis.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1988 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boeing Helicopter Co. expects to begin formal testing by late October of a full-scale but non-flying copy of the revolutionary V-22 Osprey aircraft it is building jointly for the Navy with Bell Helicopter/Textron, Boeing officials said yesterday. The Osprey "static test article," assembled at Boeing's Ridley Township plant, will be used to test the flying characteristics of the Osprey, Boeing vice president Charles Ellis said. The test article is made up of a fuselage-and-tail assembly of the aircraft, built at the Ridley plant, and a wing-and-rotor assembly put together at Bell's Fort Worth, Texas, plant.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1988 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boeing Helicopter Co., in what was described as the richest industrial real estate deal in Delaware County, has bought a 63-acre tract adjacent to its manufacturing plant and headquarters in Ridley and Eddystone Townships, officials said yesterday. Boeing, a division of the Seattle-based Boeing Co., paid Adwin Realty Co. $5.5 million for the parcel, located on the northeast side of Industrial Highway (Route 291), just southwest of the existing plant. It also is adjacent to the Interstate 476 (Blue Route)
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BUSINESS
August 17, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Triumph Group Inc., of Wayne, says it has agreed to buy General Donlee Canada Inc., a manufacturer of precision-machined parts, such as shafts for aircraft engines and helicopters for GE Aviation, Bell Helicopter and others, for $110 million, including an unspecified amount of debt. General Donlee, which is based in Toronto and employs 200, is expected to add $60 million in annual revenue and immediately add to earnings. Triumph Group had $3.76 billion in revenue in its most recent fiscal year.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
John D. Silva, 92, the Los Angeles television engineer who won Emmy Awards for creating helicopter news coverage in 1958 has died in Southern California. Mr. Silva's family told the Los Angeles Times that he died Nov. 27 of pneumonia complications in Camarillo. Mr. Silva was the chief engineer for KTLA-TV when he outfitted a rented Bell helicopter with a TV camera to create a flying TV studio. The station broadcast live aerial coverage of major news events, including earthquakes, fires, and freeway calamities.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Boeing Co. yesterday named Charles H. Allen, who fought with the Marines in Desert Storm, as vice president and general manager of its Rotorcraft Systems Division in Ridley Township. Allen is moving here from a Boeing integrated-defense systems assignment in Huntsville, Ala., to succeed Mike Tkach, who has retired. Allen will direct operations at the Philadelphia suburbs site, which employs 4,800 people, and at Boeing's Apache Helicopter program in Mesa, Ariz. Rotorcraft Systems is part of Boeing Precision Engagement and Mobility Systems, based in St. Louis.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2005 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boeing Co., Bell Helicopter and the National Journal magazine apologized yesterday to an Islamic advocacy group for creating and publishing an ad for the Osprey depicting American troops descending from the aircraft above a mosque. "It descends from the heavens. Ironically it unleashes hell," the ad's headline read. The ad copy also said: "The CV-22 delivers Special Forces to insertion points never thought possible. " The Council on American-Islamic Relations, or CAIR, asked Boeing, Bell Helicopter, and its parent Textron Inc. on Thursday to pull the ad for the CV-22 Osprey, an airplane with rotors that tilt so it can maneuver like a helicopter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1997 | By Rathe Miller, FOR THE INQUIRER
A museum with nothing but helicopters? We know what you're thinking: "I'm not that interested in helicopters. " How about a museum with just black dolls? Or just mourning art? What the heck is mourning art? You've probably been to the area's big-name attractions: the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Academy of Natural Sciences, the Barnes. But there are bunches of small museums around here. How do you know which ones are worth the trip? Well, we've scouted some of them for you. In the past, Weekend has told you about house museums (Andalusia, Wharton Esherick, Ebenezer Maxwell)
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | By Michael D. Towle, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For two decades, workers at Lockheed Martin's plant in Fort Worth, Texas, built F-16 Falcon fighters that could shoot down MiGs deployed by the Soviet Union and its allies in central Europe. But last week Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic were invited to become NATO allies. Now, Lockheed Martin is scrambling to sell the same F-16s to old enemies in central Europe. The potential payoff - billions of dollars in fighter sales. Lockheed has signed cooperative agreements with industry in the region, opened offices to communicate with officials in government and business, and sent its chairman, Norman Augustine, on a tour of Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Romania and Slovenia to advance the company's name and image.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1996 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wherever you are, whether you're walking in the canyons of Center City or ambling through a cornfield in the country, you look up when you hear the whir of a helicopter. There's something urgent about them, something that screams "Stat!" - especially when you need to touch down on a few square feet of macadam, or on a hospital roof on a rain-swept evening. The Philadelphia area was crucial in the development of the helicopter more than half a century ago, with Piasecki Helicopter (later Boeing Helicopter)
NEWS
August 22, 1995 | By Dave Urbanski, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Michael D. Hamilton, 53, a pioneer in motion-picture computer-based optical effects who worked on all the Star Trek films, has died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Lou Gehrig's disease. Mr. Hamilton, a Willingboro resident, died Wednesday at Rancocas Hospital in Willingboro. He was found to have the incurable disease 14 years ago. The president of Image Galaxy International and Graphic Effects Unlimited, both in New York City, Mr. Hamilton designed groundbreaking computer hardware and software for some of the film industry's most innovative optical effects, including the new liquid film gate, which repairs scratches on film surfaces, and the additive head lamp, which uses a prism computer effect for more accurate color.
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes saving a few bucks can be costly . . . like a few million dollars costly. That's just what appears to have happened with bids submitted to Philadelphia city officials last week for the purchase of helicopters for the Police Department. A bid submitted by Bell Helicopter has been thrown out, according to Procurement Commissioner Louis Applebaum, because a $200 deposit check submitted with the bid was not certified, but written on a regular company bank account. Applebaum said that because the bid specifications clearly stated that a certified check was required, city officials had no choice but to throw out the bid for a contract that could be valued at approximately $4.5 million.
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rendell administration yesterday decided to postpone a decision on awarding a contract for police helicopters the city wants to use to track suspects and reduce car chases. The apparent low bidder for the two or three helicopters, American Eurocopter Corp. with a $1,445,000 bid per helicopter, proposed to build the choppers in France, which required a recalculation of the bid under state law. The recalculation made them the high bidder, according to David L. Cohen, Mayor Rendell's chief of staff.
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