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BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
John S. Mayo, an engineer who helped develop the Telstar communications satellite in just two years, yesterday was named president of AT&T Bell Laboratories - promising to bring the same speed and efficiency to the renowned research facility. Mayo, 61, said he hoped "to increase the flow of innovations to the marketplace in shorter intervals. " One way, he said, might be to develop and field-test some new products at the same time. "We can often simulate situations with computers before building prototypes," he said.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Dennis M. Ritchie, 70, who helped shape the modern digital era by creating software tools that power everything from search engines such as Google to smartphones, was found dead Wednesday at his home in Berkeley Heights, N.J. Mr. Ritchie, who lived alone, had been in frail health in recent years after treatment for prostate cancer and heart disease, said his brother Bill. In the late 1960s and early '70s, working at Bell Labs, Mr. Ritchie made a pair of lasting contributions to computer science.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fourteen of the 61 people elected to the National Academy of Sciences in Washington on Tuesday are associated with Pennsylvania and New Jersey research institutions. Three of the scientists are from the University of Pennsylvania, four are from AT&T Bell Laboratories at Murray Hill, N.J., two are from Princeton University, two are from Rutgers University, two are from the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., and one is from Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1992 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the chance to do cutting-edge research that brought Jack Fuhrer, Joseph Giordmaine, Jukka Hamalainen and Dawon Kahng to New Jersey from the four corners of the world. More than 30 years ago, Korean-born Kahng and Canadian-born Giordmaine sought out AT&T's world-renowned research center, Bell Laboratories, whose installations are scattered across northern New Jersey. There, they helped shape the electronics age with their work on transistors, semiconductor chips, quantum electronics and photonics.
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a ridge looking out over cornfields here in rural Lehigh County, more than 300 construction workers clang and pound and weld in the hot summer sun as one of the nation's most important scientific facilities slowly takes shape. It is the $85 million AT&T Bell laboratory, where, in 1988, 800 scientists, engineers and other employees will begin the kind of work that could dramatically change the way most people live. Bell scientists say advances here might someday lead to television images as clear as color slides, machines that type letters merely by being talked to and vastly faster and more intelligent computers.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
A year and a half ago, Pyne Poynt Middle School science teacher Charles Walker walked into his science laboratory in Camden and found it had been gutted by fire. All was lost. "I was shocked," remembers Walker. "All the science equipment had been wiped out, as well as the kids' science books, which were already in short supply. " Undaunted by the arson and determined to continue his work despite the school district's lack of funds, Walker began teaching his students in the school cafeteria and other classrooms without any science equipment.
NEWS
December 12, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the naked eye, the tiny speck on a disk at AT&T Bell Laboratories appears to be little more than a piece of dust. But when viewed through a microscope the particle is shown to be actually a microscopic gear - part of an incredibly tiny machine. "This gear could easily fit on the cross section of a human hair," said Kaigham Gabriel, a Bell Labs researcher in Holmdel, N.J. "It's so small that you have to be careful where you breathe. I suspect that I've already inhaled a number of them into my lungs.
NEWS
May 2, 1998
OK, so it didn't have the star-power of the Academy Awards. No one commented on what the winners wore or who accompanied them to the Franklin Institute on Thursday evening when they received their money and medals. The Franklin Institute's awards program does not bring Hollywood to the Parkway. But each year, it does bring world recognition to scientists, business leaders and thinkers whose contributions will last far longer than any 15 minutes of fame. It says something about America that we drool over statuettes given to soap-opera actors and makeup artists, but don't applaud loudly enough for those whose quieter accomplishments lead to a greater understanding of science and to the secrets of life itself.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Two years ago, CyOptics Inc. was looking to go public and raise $100 million, but it dropped those plans last May. On Thursday, the Lehigh County maker of optical components agreed to be acquired for $400 million. The buyer? A cash-rich Singapore company called Avago Technologies Inc. It's telling that Avago was able to pull off its initial public offering during one of the worst years for such financings (2009), while CyOptics couldn't squeak through the IPO window during the year when Facebook went public - the biggest tech IPO ever.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1995 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For most of this century, it was the engine that made the United States the science and technology champion of the world. But now the great American research machine is sputtering. Private industry, the federal government and the universities - the three pillars supporting the nation's $180 billion scientific and engineering establishment - are pinching pennies, downsizing, and concentrating more on practical, short-term research projects than on discovering the underlying mysteries of nature.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Two years ago, CyOptics Inc. was looking to go public and raise $100 million, but it dropped those plans last May. On Thursday, the Lehigh County maker of optical components agreed to be acquired for $400 million. The buyer? A cash-rich Singapore company called Avago Technologies Inc. It's telling that Avago was able to pull off its initial public offering during one of the worst years for such financings (2009), while CyOptics couldn't squeak through the IPO window during the year when Facebook went public - the biggest tech IPO ever.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Omar L. Gallaga, AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN
AUSTIN, Texas - The woman, a test subject, sits at a computer listening to a set of scripted instructions. "Tell me what you think, not what I want you to think. You can leave at any time. I'm here to learn about how travelers obtain traffic and road construction information through a website. " Conducting the test is a University of Texas master's in information science student, Donna Habersaat. She watches and answers questions as the test subject clicks and scrolls through drivetexas.org, a Texas Department of Transportation website for travelers.
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Dennis M. Ritchie, 70, who helped shape the modern digital era by creating software tools that power everything from search engines such as Google to smartphones, was found dead Wednesday at his home in Berkeley Heights, N.J. Mr. Ritchie, who lived alone, had been in frail health in recent years after treatment for prostate cancer and heart disease, said his brother Bill. In the late 1960s and early '70s, working at Bell Labs, Mr. Ritchie made a pair of lasting contributions to computer science.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1999 | By David J. Wallace, FOR THE INQUIRER
Another industrial revolution is under way here as the mills and factories that made this city famous give way to the technology economy. And nowhere is that change more evident than in the carpeted hallways of Lucent Technologies Inc., where robotic mail-delivery units beep quietly along. From the outside, Lucent's Allentown facility is unmistakably a factory: an institutional-strength concrete rectangle common to post-World War II construction. It could be producing anything.
NEWS
May 2, 1998
OK, so it didn't have the star-power of the Academy Awards. No one commented on what the winners wore or who accompanied them to the Franklin Institute on Thursday evening when they received their money and medals. The Franklin Institute's awards program does not bring Hollywood to the Parkway. But each year, it does bring world recognition to scientists, business leaders and thinkers whose contributions will last far longer than any 15 minutes of fame. It says something about America that we drool over statuettes given to soap-opera actors and makeup artists, but don't applaud loudly enough for those whose quieter accomplishments lead to a greater understanding of science and to the secrets of life itself.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Howard J. Guggenheim, 72, a retired patent-holding chemist for Bell Laboratories, died Monday at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township. He had resided in Washington Crossing for six years after living in Bridgewater, N.J., for 23 years. Mr. Guggenheim was born in New York and earned his high school diploma onboard a ship headed for the South Pacific during World War II, said a son, Howard Guggenheim. As a member of the Marine Corps' Fourth Infantry Division, Mr. Guggenheim took part in the campaigns for Tinian and Saipan in the Mariana Islands.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1995 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For most of this century, it was the engine that made the United States the science and technology champion of the world. But now the great American research machine is sputtering. Private industry, the federal government and the universities - the three pillars supporting the nation's $180 billion scientific and engineering establishment - are pinching pennies, downsizing, and concentrating more on practical, short-term research projects than on discovering the underlying mysteries of nature.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1993 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alex Egyed lived an American success story that ended nine years ago with a horrific twist. And his legacy lives on at AW Computer Systems Inc., of Mount Laurel, which he headed when he died in 1984. Namely, through a continuing worry: When will his estate sell the nearly 10 percent of the company it still owns? Not in a headlong, price-busting rush, the company announced yesterday, seeking to quell rumors. Egyed's story started when he came to America as a Hungarian refugee in 1956.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1992 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the chance to do cutting-edge research that brought Jack Fuhrer, Joseph Giordmaine, Jukka Hamalainen and Dawon Kahng to New Jersey from the four corners of the world. More than 30 years ago, Korean-born Kahng and Canadian-born Giordmaine sought out AT&T's world-renowned research center, Bell Laboratories, whose installations are scattered across northern New Jersey. There, they helped shape the electronics age with their work on transistors, semiconductor chips, quantum electronics and photonics.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
John S. Mayo, an engineer who helped develop the Telstar communications satellite in just two years, yesterday was named president of AT&T Bell Laboratories - promising to bring the same speed and efficiency to the renowned research facility. Mayo, 61, said he hoped "to increase the flow of innovations to the marketplace in shorter intervals. " One way, he said, might be to develop and field-test some new products at the same time. "We can often simulate situations with computers before building prototypes," he said.
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