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Bellevue

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NEWS
May 24, 1991 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
The Sports Club Cafe sounds like a private club but isn't. It's perceived by some as a health food restaurant, which it's not. And you don't have to wear workout attire to eat there. Although it's adjacent to the Sporting Club, a serious members-only gym in the Bellevue hotel and office complex, the Sports Club Cafe is open to the public. And because the public does not live by yogurt and oat bran alone, the Sports Club Cafe serves burgers, mayo-slathered club sandwiches and Italian pastries in addition to the calorie-conscious choices.
NEWS
March 7, 1986 | By TONI LOCY, ANN GERHART, and GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writers (Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report.)
The Bellevue Stratford's 83-year life will end this afternoon, quietly and without ceremony. Rubin Associates is closing the hotel 27 days ahead of the original April 2 deadline, a spokeswoman said. The union representing hotel employees has accepted the company's $500,000 settlement package and agreed to drop its three lawsuits, prompting the early shutdown of the landmark at Broad and Walnut streets. Owners will give each of the hotel's 350 union workers severance pay and provide health coverage for three months beyond the date each worker was furloughed, said James Small, president and business manager of Local 274 of the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A pot of flowers outside the Hotel Atop the Bellevue fell victim to the massive security that surrounded President Bush's visit to Philadelphia yesterday. "A police horse began to eat them," reported an amused Chris van der Baars, the hotel's managing director. "But the officer slapped him on the neck and said, 'You're going to get a tummy ache.' " Other than that pot of posies, the presidential visit went off without a hitch, van der Baars said. "The Secret Service really made life easy for us. Two weeks ago, they briefed us on exactly what to expect.
FOOD
March 5, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Mere mortals rarely get the chance to enter, much less dine in, the hallowed halls of a historic du Pont family mansion. But when we do, our expectations are understandably high. And where the setting is concerned, Bellevue in the Park - built at great cost on a hill overlooking the Delaware north of Wilmington - meets those expectations in fine style. Lawns are flawless, plantings priceless. The pillared portico has marble underfoot. Ceilings are high, paneling profuse. Each room has its own distinctive decorator color scheme.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next weekend offers classical music lovers - and other interested individuals - an opportunity to support a real class act, the Philadelphia Orchestra, during the organization's annual fund-raising radiothon, to be broadcast live from the Shops at the Bellevue. You can drop in to the hotel anytime beginning at 5 p.m. March 22, when the radiothon goes on the air on WFLN-FM, 95.7 on the dial. Scheduled throughout the three-day event are live musical performances and interviews with celebrities.
NEWS
January 23, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writers Frederick H. Lowe, Bob Eisberg and Caroline Stewart contributed to this report.)
The Bellevue Stratford, the once-regal queen of Philadelphia hotels, will close Feb. 2 - a victim of the city's anemic hotel and convention industry. The hotel's future is uncertain, though the chain that owns part of the Bellevue said the Broad Street landmark will be redeveloped and eventually reopened. Managers gave the employees official notice yesterday, but they refused to answer questions about the future of the hotel. The news stunned workers and sent city convention and meeting planners scrambling to find alternative sites for events.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1989 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gucci, the ritzy Italian retailer, has found a home in Philadelphia at the Bellevue. So too has the Palm restaurant. And Pierre Deux, a home-furnishing store. Gucci, known for its sportswear, leather goods, shoes and accessories, will open a 5,000-square-foot bi-level shop this fall in what used to be the Burgundy Room of the old hotel. For more than a year, Gucci officials scoured Philadelphia for a spot to set down roots. They found a snug fit at the Bellevue - now renovated into a combination of shops, offices and a smaller, luxury hotel - which is anchoring the trendy fashion stores burgeoning along Walnut Street.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1988 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Bellevue reopens today, but don't rush off for your tux. Today, the Bellevue opens for work. The building's first office tenants, the Center City law firm of Astor, Weiss & Newman, were to move into the renovated hotel this morning, marking the Bellevue's latest reincarnation as an office, retail and hotel complex. The 84-year-old hotel closed more than two years ago for the $100 million renovation that will shave the number of hotel rooms from 565 to 173, convert 10 floors to office space and transform the lower three floors into a shopping arcade.
NEWS
March 6, 1988 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
She has been stripped of her fixtures. Her suites have been gutted. Whole floors have been knocked away. The old Grande Dame of Broad Street is getting the complete makeover. Like steamships, grand hotels were always called she. They seemed to take on lives of their own. Indeed, the historic Bellevue hotel has had more lives than a feline. Now, you could say that she's in mudpack and curlers, undergoing a $100 million lift from the sidewalk to the 19th floor. She doesn't look like much yet. But she will.
FOOD
February 23, 1994 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
It's eau de golabki - and not the expensive scent of Gucci cologne - that greets lobby visitors to the Hotel Atop the Bellevue these days. Philadelphians whose lack of appetite for high-priced Gucci fashions led the Italian firm to close its location in the hotel's lobby recently seem to be finding the homey fragrances of Polish stuffed cabbage, pizza, hoagies, fried oysters, fresh-baked pretzels and Chinese food much more to their taste....
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
THE THOUSAND or so hand-painted faces looking down from the buttery walls of the Palm restaurant are full of smiles, for the most part. Mr. T isn't happy, of course, and it's hard to tell how the collies (Dixie and Pumpkin) feel, but most faces are beaming, from Rob Lowe's brother, Chad, to former Eagles linebacker Dhani Jones and the actor Lorenzo Lamas, who played Lance Cumson on the 1980s TV show Falcon Crest . Chad who? Falcon what? Isn't Donnie Jones the Eagles' punter? That's been the problem lately at the Palm.
NEWS
February 18, 2016
A story Tuesday on restaurants cited for violations by the Philadelphia health department incorrectly located Copabanana/Hurricane. It is at Fourth and South Streets. A photo caption in some editions Tuesday with a story about slaying victim Royon Price misspelled the name of his mother, Yolonda Price-Briscoe. A story Tuesday on the Grammy Awards misspelled the name of the Richard Rodgers Theater in Manhattan. A story Tuesday on renovations to the Palm restaurant incorrectly described its location.
NEWS
December 20, 2015
The Auxiliary of Einstein Healthcare Network hosted its 63d Einstein Harvest Ball on Nov. 7 at the Hyatt at the Bellevue. More than 600 attended the event, which included dinner, dancing, and honoring Michelle and David Shabot, as well as Korn Ferry, for their longtime commitment to Einstein and health care. Fun was had by all, and the evening was a true success, as $1.15 million was raised, which will be used to support the more than 150,000 patients who visit the emergency rooms of Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia, Einstein Medical Center Elkins Park, and Einstein Medical Center Montgomery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
It's been out only since Oct. 6, but already the evocative story of Philly LGBT-rights activist Mark Segal is getting a second printing. And Then I Danced: Traveling the Road to LGBT Equality , released this month by OpenLens, is the nation's first LGBT memoir, according to Segal, founder and publisher of Philadelphia Gay News . It describes his experiences as one of the leaders of the Gay Liberation Front and Gay Youth, organizations...
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert A. Herbert, 84, of Haddonfield, a former group building manager for Richard I. Rubin & Co., the Philadelphia real estate firm, died Sunday, Jan. 12, at the hospice of Kennedy University Hospital in Stratford after a fall at home. When he retired in the 2000s, his wife, Dorothy, said, he was managing the Bellevue, at Broad and Walnut Streets, which in part houses the Hyatt at the Bellevue hotel. Born near McKeesport, Pa., in an area where his father was a coal miner, Mr. Herbert graduated from McKeesport High School and earned a bachelor's degree at Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pa. Mr. Herbert earned a full scholarship to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, his wife said, where he earned a master's degree in government administration and was ranked top in his class.
NEWS
March 3, 2012 | By David Lightman, McClatchy Newspapers
BELLEVUE, Wash. - Washington state Republicans will hold caucuses Saturday, hoping to make or break the four presidential candidates' momentum - however briefly, before 10 more states weigh in Tuesday - in the race for the party's 2012 nomination. Though only about 60,000 Republicans are expected to turn out in a state of 3.7 million voters, the political world will be watching closely. Mitt Romney, Ron Paul, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich all have campaigned in the state recently.
FOOD
January 12, 2012
Creme de la crepe "A lot of people think of crepes as fancy food," says Crêpe Town owner Julie Bartfield, who, with her chef-husband Mike, has been operating the stand in the Bellevue food court for a few months. "They are more like street food. Healthy, too. " Mike crisps the ethereal pancake to order, before layering in sweet or savory fillings. The Belgium chocolate-cherry is hard to resist. The crepe recipe was passed down to Mike from his great-grandfather. By spring, the Bartfields hope to be serving their treats in a second, street-level Center City shop.
NEWS
January 10, 2012
"A lot of people think of crepes as fancy food," says Crêpe Town owner Julie Bartfield, who, with her chef-husband Mike, has been operating the stand in the Bellevue food court for a few months. "They are more like street food. Healthy, too. " Mike crisps the ethereal pancake to order, before layering in sweet or savory fillings. The Belgium chocolate-cherry is hard to resist. The crepe recipe was passed down to Mike from his great-grandfather. By spring, the Bartfields hope to be serving their treats in a second, street-level Center City shop.
NEWS
June 27, 2009 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back about 1930, when Pasquale "Pat" Olivieri invented the steak sandwich, the factory worker and son of Italian immigrants probably couldn't get through the front doors of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. The Beaux Arts landmark on South Broad Street was the bastion of Philadelphia high society. Visiting royalty and wealthy industrialists could enjoy it, but not South Philly sandwich makers, not even one who styled himself the King of Steaks. Yesterday at the Bellevue, however, you could not only buy a cheesesteak "wit' ," you could actually buy one made by Pat's grandson Rick.
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