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Belly Dancers

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NEWS
December 5, 2010 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the federal government cutting housing subsidies in 2006, Philadelphia Housing Authority managers spared no expense to take "diversity awareness to a new level. " How else to explain the karaoke singers, salsa dance instructor, Swiss Alps yodelers, and belly dancers who were mingling with PHA middle managers at the Wilson Park Community Center? The cost: about $17,150, including $1,200 for the belly dancers. The evening's finale began when four exotically clad belly dancers pulled members of the audience into their show.
NEWS
April 3, 1986 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Vidulich is 84 and said he was "too old" to be interested in watching shapely women belly-dancing around the community room of the Grundy Tower senior citizens' apartment building. So he left. But when the first dancer, "Sapphire" - sometimes known as Peggy Howland, 28, of Holland - took to the floor in a black hip skirt and decorated white bra, Vidulich had quietly returned and was right up there in a front-row seat. His eyes sparkled as "Isis" - known by day as Patty Stone, 31, of Yardley, vice president of the Bucks County Artesian Well Drilling Co.- wriggled her hips past his seat.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let's say you have these travel writers coming to town, and you want to sell the city to them, get them stirred up about its virtues and eager to write puffy pieces that will attract tourists. So, where do you take them? The Liberty Bell, right? The Art Museum, the Rodin Museum, Penn's Landing. No. If you are the Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau, you take them to the Shoe Museum, Woodlands Cemetery, a Russian restaurant and a miniature golf course. "Travel writers, especially freelance travel writers, don't want to see the Liberty Bell," said R. C. Staab, bureau vice president.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
Just when you thought the Carl R. Greene era at the Philadelphia Housing Authority had exhausted the supply of embarrassing tales, belly dancers jiggle into view. As reported Sunday, PHA managers held a "diversity training" event in 2006 that featured four belly dancers and salsa lessons. PHA paid $1,200 for the belly dancers; the whole event cost $17,150. PHA funds at work. Greene, the former PHA director, was photographed beaming broadly in the company of the dancers. Apparently he missed the memos about a)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | By Michael Harrington, Special to The Inquirer
If you're staying in town for Labor Day weekend, you'll be be able to send the summer out in traditional Philadelphia style. That's right, with brass bands and belly dancers. Two annual events celebrate the workers' day off. The first, the Old City Labor Day Fete, is a street festival featuring international food specialties from local restaurants, plus live music and belly dancers. A special event this year is a Christopher Columbus look-alike contest, with the top prize of $100 going to the best impersonation of the explorer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
South Philadelphian Dimitri Thrasyvoulou, also known as DJ Dimitri, makes Sunday nights international nights at Byblos. "Greek International Night" attracts college students, urban professionals and regular partygoers, so DJ Dimitri has many musical tastes to satisfy in one night. "People like the variety of the music. I look at the crowd. If the crowd is international, then I play to the crowd," the 30-year-old says. The music style ranges from dance to hip-hop, Lebanese, Arabic, Egyptian, and Greek music.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
The "right thinking people" of this city do not understand what is going on in the First District Council race this spring. And to tell you the truth, neither do I. The race for the Council seat in the First District - which includes parts of South Philadelphia, Center City east of Broad Street, Fishtown, Kensington and Harrowgate - is a difficult one to understand. For example, Leland Beloff, the incumbent who is running for re-election with a federal extortion trial as an added handicap, was endorsed by the Democratic caucus in the district, taking the breath away from a great number of people who lust for honest government.
NEWS
December 8, 2010
AS ETHICAL scandals go, this has so far been a banner month, topped off by the sudden retirement of elections official Renee Tartaglione as a result of an investigation that found she was actively electioneering: paying for misleading ballots, and serving as de facto ward leader. The thing that strikes us is how long many of these scandals take to come to light. It's worth remembering that it's not just bad players who should be sanctioned; it's also the people who witnessed wrongdoing and stayed silent.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1994 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When you think of the Middle East, you think history blended with change. The same could be said of the Middle East Restaurant: Rich in city lore and often a step ahead of the times. In 1958, when the restaurant was founded by Sliman and Nora Tayoun in a two-story house near 10th and Ellsworth Streets, it was a family affair where the children helped run things. How many of us outside that Lebanese community had eaten such foods? You would open the door of the tiny 28-seat restaurant and be greeted by the smells of garlic and mint.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1987 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are tuned up this weekend for a hot time in the old town. Having been refused permission to stage their annual street fair on Memorial Day weekend, the merchants and restaurant owners in Old City are gearing up for a Fourth of July frolic that will make up for lost opportunity. There will be outdoor music, entertainment, dancing, food and drink tomorrow and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. along Second Street from Market to Walnut and on Chestnut Street from Third to Front.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 8, 2010
AS ETHICAL scandals go, this has so far been a banner month, topped off by the sudden retirement of elections official Renee Tartaglione as a result of an investigation that found she was actively electioneering: paying for misleading ballots, and serving as de facto ward leader. The thing that strikes us is how long many of these scandals take to come to light. It's worth remembering that it's not just bad players who should be sanctioned; it's also the people who witnessed wrongdoing and stayed silent.
NEWS
December 7, 2010
Just when you thought the Carl R. Greene era at the Philadelphia Housing Authority had exhausted the supply of embarrassing tales, belly dancers jiggle into view. As reported Sunday, PHA managers held a "diversity training" event in 2006 that featured four belly dancers and salsa lessons. PHA paid $1,200 for the belly dancers; the whole event cost $17,150. PHA funds at work. Greene, the former PHA director, was photographed beaming broadly in the company of the dancers. Apparently he missed the memos about a)
NEWS
December 5, 2010 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the federal government cutting housing subsidies in 2006, Philadelphia Housing Authority managers spared no expense to take "diversity awareness to a new level. " How else to explain the karaoke singers, salsa dance instructor, Swiss Alps yodelers, and belly dancers who were mingling with PHA middle managers at the Wilson Park Community Center? The cost: about $17,150, including $1,200 for the belly dancers. The evening's finale began when four exotically clad belly dancers pulled members of the audience into their show.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | By Monica Peters FOR THE INQUIRER
South Philadelphian Dimitri Thrasyvoulou, also known as DJ Dimitri, makes Sunday nights international nights at Byblos. "Greek International Night" attracts college students, urban professionals and regular partygoers, so DJ Dimitri has many musical tastes to satisfy in one night. "People like the variety of the music. I look at the crowd. If the crowd is international, then I play to the crowd," the 30-year-old says. The music style ranges from dance to hip-hop, Lebanese, Arabic, Egyptian, and Greek music.
NEWS
August 20, 2003 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Each era has its own erogenous zone, a different body part to unveil, adorn, alter, and elevate. Breasts, legs, necks, bottoms, breasts again. This is the midriff's moment. Jeans ride so far south that their zippers, some as abbreviated as two inches, seem more appropriate for Barbie. Shirts appear pre-shrunk, ending a foot above the waist, possibly borrowed from toddlers. Long displayed only on beaches, belly buttons are now veritable jewelry counters, sporting studs, hoops, chains, dangles, Venetian-glass grape clusters, and circular barbells that resemble key chains.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | This is a shortened version of a column by Larry McMullen that appeared in the Daily News June 30, 1977
The Ben Franklin Parkway is Philadelphia's Champs Elysees. Its grandest boulevard. Home to some of its most important institutions. And among the most photographed spots in the city. More than 1,300 buildings had to be demolished before it opened to automobile traffic in 1918. But it is the Parkway's use as a pedestrian promenade and a tree-lined space for ethnic festivals, open-air concerts and fireworks displays that makes it so special. The belly dancers were dark-haired and cream-skinned with slim, athletic, American-style bodies, and there were so many people crowded around the stage where they were performing, it was almost funny.
SPORTS
January 24, 1998 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
It could have turned into a Greek tragedy, but Kenny Ellis, just as he said he would, stepped in to save the day. First-time promoter Mike Maltepes was enduring the worst maiden voyage since the Titanic until Ellis - more or less thrust into the role of Leonardo DiCaprio - manned the pump and helped salvage Maltepes's sinking boxing card last night at the Blue Horizon. In scoring a sixth-round technical knockout of outgunned Anthony Perry (8-2-1, 4 knockouts), Ellis (21-0-2, 13 KOs)
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Middle East restaurant, where many Philadelphians got their first eyeful of belly dancers and their first taste of baba ghanouj, has closed after 38 years. The Old City building and furnishings will go up for auction next month. A news conference is scheduled for this morning to announce the sale. Tayoun family members estimated that they had served about a million meals at the Middle East, which was founded in a South Philadelphia rowhouse by a laid-off welder from the hills of Lebanon with a gift for pastry-making.
NEWS
October 20, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the day, Donna Hernandez types and files for the city of Burlington; at night, she wiggles and swivels as a belly dancer. At a recent rehearsal, her arms rippled as if there were no bones to get in the way. With two fingers on each hand, she played her zils, her finger cymbals. Her shoulders shimmied as her feet slid back and forth. But more entrancing than Hernandez's hip circles and hand undulations was her face: She couldn't stop smiling. Mention belly-dancing and most people think of a woman clad in sequined bra and little else as she moves through a group of ogling men. There's a hint of something scandalous, something forbidden, about the dance and its dancers.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those who think dance exercises begin and end with step aerobics to the accompaniment of Madonna, loud and fast, might want to stop by Harcum College in a few weeks. Ask for Habiba. She'll be the one demonstrating the lock-lifts. The arabesques. Various undulations. A whole lot of shakin'. And, of course, the body wave. This body wave has nothing to do with hair. Habiba's body wave means the whole body: From the balls of her feet, which rest on the floor, to the knees, which start to bend, to the hips, which give a gentle undulation, to the torso, which leans slightly forward, to the head, which moves up and down and back.
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