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Belmont Stakes

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SPORTS
May 28, 2008 | By Craig Donnelly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Big Brown will be the heavy favorite to become the first Triple Crown winner since Affirmed in 1978 when he faces 10 likely rivals in the Belmont Stakes on June 7. After his big wins in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, the 1 1/2 miles at Belmont might not be the colt's biggest obstacle, however. The imposing runner missed three days of training with a quarter crack in his left front foot but returned to the track yesterday, jogging 1 1/2 miles. Here is the probable Belmont Stakes field: Horse Trainer Jockey 1. Big Brown Dutrow Desormeaux He is seeking to become the 12th Triple Crown winner, but his preparation was delayed by foot problem.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Dick Jerardi, DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
ELMONT, N.Y. - Phyllis and Jamie Wyeth were alternately looking at the small monitor to their right and down the long Belmont Park stretch beyond the finish line to their left. The colt that had been raised at Point Lookout, their Chadds Ford farm, was just a few lengths off the lead with 200 yards to run in the Belmont Stakes. From their second-floor vantage point, the same spot where they watched the Champagne Stakes last October, they could see Union Rags was gaining momentum with every stride.
SPORTS
June 9, 2013 | By Zach Helfand, Inquirer Staff Writer
ELMONT, N.Y. - The horses were making the turn to the homestretch at Belmont Park, and two had separated. Oxbow had led much of the race and Palace Malice had stalked behind, and now the two horses were even. Aboard Palace Malice, Mike Smith turned to his left, to Oxbow and Gary Stevens. "It was like a movie scene," Smith said. "I could just see [Stevens'] face clear as day, and he says: 'Go on with it, little brother. You're moving better than me.' " With that, Palace Malice peeled away from Oxbow and a charging Orb to take Saturday's 145th Belmont Stakes by 31/4 lengths.
SPORTS
June 6, 2013 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
ON THE 40th anniversary of Secretariat's Belmont Stakes win, when the colt ran off 31 lengths in front of the field into an unknown realm, we wait in vain for the next Secretariat or Seattle Slew or Affirmed, the Triple Crown still elusive. No Triple Crown is on the line in Saturday's Belmont Stakes, but we do get a rematch between the winner of the Kentucky Derby (Orb) and Preakness (Oxbow), as well as a terrific betting race, promised by a 14-horse field with much intrigue and more than a few question marks.
SPORTS
May 20, 2013 | Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Another year, another Triple Crown hopeful unable to come through. After Oxbow, ridden by 50-year-old Hall of Famer Gary Stevens, upset Kentucky Derby winner Orb in Saturday's Preakness to extend racing's Triple Crown drought to 36 years, the next best alternative for the Belmont Stakes is a rematch. And, it appears one is in the making. Both trainers are giving every indication their classic-winning colts will run in the Belmont on June 8. "You know me," Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas said after Oxbow's 13/4-length victory over Itsmyluckyday, with 3-5 favorite Orb finishing fourth.
SPORTS
June 11, 2011 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
WHEN THE Kentucky Derby and Preakness winners are in the starting gate, the Belmont Stakes is always a terrific standalone race. The 1 1/2-mile distance may be an anachronism. You may need a high-powered telescope to see the horses on the backstretch. And, in the end, it may not really tell you that much because none of these horses will ever run the distance on dirt again. Still, it is hard to resist this Belmont with Animal Kingdom against Shackleford, alongside 10 others in the starting gate, all with their own stories.
SPORTS
July 24, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Birdstone, who denied Smarty Jones the Triple Crown with his shocking come-from-behind victory in the June 5 Belmont Stakes, will make his first start back on Aug. 28 in the $1 million Travers Stakes. "The only shot I have of getting him to the Travers is to train him up to the race," trainer Nick Zito told Bloodhorse.com. "So, we'll just have to wait it out and get him in that cycle and try to pull it off. He has run some of his best races off layoffs. He proved that in the Belmont.
SPORTS
July 13, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
August Belmont IV, grandson of the founder of Belmont Park, is dead at the age of 86. He died Monday in Easton, Md., following a massive stroke, the New York Racing Association said. Among Belmont's stakes winners were Dew Line, Heed, Quadratic and Caveat, who won the 1983 Belmont Stakes, named after his great grandfather, the first August Belmont. Belmont IV was a member and former chairman of The Jockey Club, an honorary trustee of Presbyterian Hospital in New York, a trustee of the American Museum of Natural History, and a member and former chairman of the American Kennel Club.
SPORTS
July 11, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Belmont Stakes winner Union Rags is out for the remainder of the year with a tendon injury, said Russell Jones, bloodstock adviser to the colt's owner, Phyllis Wyeth of Chadds Ford. The injury was discovered Tuesday morning by trainer Michael Matz. More information will be released Wednesday by veterinarian Kathy Anderson, Jones said. "At this point, a lot is up in the air," Jones said. "Even though he's done minor damage to the leg, there's no chance he will run again this year.
NEWS
June 13, 2008
SPORTS WRITER Dick Jerardi covered every reason imaginable why Big Brown came up small in the Belmont Stakes: The jockey, the weather, and even the competition's strategy. But how could a horse that never lost a race come in last at Belmont? Big Brown was a slam dunk to win. In a race where so much money is bet on the obvious, but ends in an absolutely unbelievable result, one has to consider that the fix was in. No, the very thought of it is so outrageous that Dick must have dismissed it. Or could it be the industry and others are circling the wagons?
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SPORTS
May 19, 2015 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
BALTIMORE - A hot, muggy spring day had begun to cool late Saturday afternoon as the area around Pimlico darkened and a breeze blew through the old racetrack grounds. It was 5:35 p.m. when Kentucky Derby winner American Pharoah emerged from the stakes barn to get his prerace bath, a ritual that would quickly prove unnecessary. The 140th Preakness, which attracted a record 131,680, was about to get an unwanted visit from the skies, which went black as the eight horses were wandering about the grass course 15 minutes before the 6:18 post time.
SPORTS
May 18, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
BALTIMORE - The storm had been building much of the afternoon, rolling in from the west and gradually darkening the sky behind the grandstand at Pimlico Race Course. It arrived just before the start of the 140th Preakness Stakes, and the horses on the track had to shuffle around and wait a few minutes in the downpour before being loaded into the gate. There was lightning in the area and thunder rumbling overhead, which are not optimal conditions for millions of dollars of horseflesh to stand inside a steel starting gate.
SPORTS
May 18, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - Pimlico's infield, packed with raucous revelers all day, was eerily empty, evacuated in advance of a storm that struck minutes before the race. Lightning bolts snapped and flashed in the darkness engulfing this 143-year-old track. And the rain, a relentless torrent, fell hard and angrily. But as he powerfully separated himself from seven muddy and outclassed rivals in the 140th Preakness Stakes' swampy stretch late Saturday afternoon, American Pharoah never seemed to notice.
SPORTS
May 17, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - The Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes may be more glamorous, but it's the Preakness alone that can transform three distinct races into a Triple Crown. When Derby winners falter at Pimlico, the anticipation and curiosity that animate the three races disappears. Whatever happened at Churchill Downs two weeks earlier fades from memory. And June's climactic Belmont is instead anticlimactic. So, in addition to jockey Victor Espinoza, American Pharoah will carry that burden for the troubled sport late Saturday afternoon when he heads a bifurcated field of eight 3-year-olds in the 140th Preakness.
SPORTS
September 22, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The crowd came out to Parx Racing to see a star on Saturday in the 35th running of the Pennsylvania Derby, and California Chrome looked perfect for the role of a Hollywood hero as he walked regally around the paddock, accepted Victor Espinoza onto his back, and stepped onto the track to play his part. And then they ran the race. Someone messed with the script, just as they had in June at the Belmont Stakes, when Chrome wasn't able to parlay wins in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes into Triple Crown immortality.
SPORTS
September 20, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Steve Coburn, a lifelong westerner, had never been to Philadelphia before this week, so he put his pearl-gray Stetson on his head and took his wife, Carolyn, to see the Liberty Bell on Wednesday. The line was pretty long and stretched down the block, so Coburn went around the side to see whether there might be another way in. Not really, but he came to a glass wall and right there was the Liberty Bell, and they both got a good, long look at it. "People were standing in line a long time to get their picture taken next to it, but I saw it. I even saw the crack," Coburn said.
SPORTS
September 19, 2014 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
IN THE END, it is still a horse race. It just happens to be the most important race in the history of Pennsylvania racing and the first time a Kentucky Derby winner has run in the state after winning the Derby. The stakes are high for tomorrow's $1 million Pennsylvania Derby at Parx, with many questions. Is California Chrome the same horse that so dominated his peers all winter and spring? Is he better? If he wins and looks good doing it, how cool will the Nov. 1 Breeders' Cup Classic at Santa Anita be, with Chrome against unbeaten Shared Belief, last year's 2-year-old champion, who is scheduled to run in the Sept.
SPORTS
September 18, 2014 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
ONE OF the time-honored traditions of big-time horse racing is the "wait" at the barn for the star to arrive. Word was California Chrome would arrive on the Parx backstretch at 3 p.m. yesterday. The Kentucky Derby winner walked out his stall at Los Alamitos Race Course at 2 a.m. Pacific time, rode in a van to the Ontario (Calif.) Airport, where he flew with several other horses to Lexington, Ky. After a brief stop, the plane was flown to Allentown. Chrome got on to another van there and arrived at Barn 10, flanked by the three-eighths pole and the Pennsylvania Turnpike, promptly at 3:42 p.m. As is Chrome's custom, he was backed down the chute by assistant trainer Alan Sherman and walked smoothly right into his home until Saturday's $1 million Pennsylvania Derby.
SPORTS
September 18, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner California Chrome, ready to race Saturday for the first time since his ill-fated bid for the Triple Crown in the Belmont Stakes, is the even-money favorite in the $1 million Pennsylvania Derby. Is facing Chrome right off a layoff the best shot for his opponents? That would make sense. "It does leave him a little vulnerable in my book," said Ron Winchell, owner of Tapiture, also running in the Pennsylvania Derby, and Untapable, the favorite in the $1 million Cotillion.
SPORTS
June 10, 2014 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Staff Writer
ELMONT, N.Y. - It was 5:39 p.m. Saturday when California Chrome left Barn 26 on the Belmont Park backstretch to head for Barn 4, the holding area where horses about to race get blood drawn and gather for the walk through the nearby tunnel to the paddock. The Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner, followed as he was in the Preakness by Ride On Curlin, made his way past the barn of Hall of Famer Bill Mott with the sign that said "Cigar, winner of the Dubai World Cup. " Then, he passed by the Phipps barn where Easy Goer emerged 25 years ago to deny Sunday Silence the Triple Crown.
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