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Ben

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Deep in the forest, by a rippling creek, ringed by the song of birds and the soft crush of animals moving across pine needles and moss, the Cash family reside. It's an idyllic life, but a rigorous one: The father, Ben (Viggo Mortensen), rules over his six kids, testing them on the books they've read ( Middlemarch, The Brothers Karamazov , Karl Marx, Noam Chomsky), leading them on rock climbs and long runs, training them to use a knife to kill and skin deer. Ben teaches his sons and daughters hand-to-hand combat, too - how to use a long, serrated blade on another human.
LIVING
September 29, 1995 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
While visiting a friend who had recently been adopted, Ben, 11, was astonished to hear her complaining about something that he considered small and insignificant. "What's in your head, girl?" he asked. "You have a permanent home, a bed, and nice clothes. " Then, he added quietly, "I don't have a family. " But recently Ben was moved into a foster home, where he finally has something else he has always wanted - his own room. The first day, he spent the whole day in his room, enjoying his surroundings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2003 | By HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
SO MUCH Ben and J.Lo news for a soggy holiday weekend: Imdb.com reports that the "Sexiest Man Alive" is going to promote L'Oreal shampoo. Affleck's sudsational deal is worth approximately $1.5 million. Why? Because he's worth it. As if their constant cooing wasn't indication enough, the New York Post's Page Six says the twice-married Lopez is finally happy. And J.Lo mom Guadalupe loves her future son-in-law. "Ben is like Jennifer," Guadalupe said. "Generous to a fault.
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Sons of Ben are many things: Loud. Brash. Passionate. Always loyal, totally dedicated, and occasionally soused. Now they're about to be something else: movie stars. Seriously. A New York filmmaker is deep into shooting a feature-length documentary about the rise of the rabid Philadelphia Union fan club, exploring its pivotal role in redefining the local soccer landscape. Director Jeffrey C. Bell, though not a big soccer fan, became fascinated with the idea of how a supporters group could develop for a team that did not then exist - and that the group's months of rallying, lobbying, and cajoling actually paid off, when Major League Soccer named Philadelphia as its 16th club in 2008.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
By William C. Kashatus Ben is a mischievous 10-year-old with a contagious smile. When he's happy, he spontaneously skips around the house. He can also be disarmingly affectionate, offering a big hug after stirring up trouble with his older brothers. But Ben can be difficult to understand, speaking only in sentence fragments. He's shy outside the family. And his frustration with crowded places can lead to a "meltdown. " In case you haven't already guessed, Ben is among as many as 1.5 million Americans with autism-spectrum disorders, a population that has risen in recent years to one in every 110 births.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1993 | By John J. Fried, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When USX Corp. decided this year to pay a $1.8 million penalty for polluting the air and water around its Clairton Coke Works, the steel manufacturer became BEN's latest victim. BEN is not the Environmental Protection Agency's stripe-suited enforcer, a man with pitiless eyes and a suspicious bulge just above the spot where his heart ought to be. But it might as well be. BEN is a formula the agency uses to determine how much companies or municipal agencies, universities and others have to cough up if they have failed to install pollution-control equipment - and it has proven to be as effective as any sociopathic enforcer could ever hope to be. In EPA's view, BEN - short for benefit - is the epitome of economically fair enforcement.
NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Four-thirty in the morning, John Alessi was asleep in a Syracuse, N.Y., hotel room, away on business, when the phone rang. It was his son's best friend, Tyler. "Mr. Alessi, I'm real sorry, but I think Ben's dead. " Ben wasn't dead, but he was badly hurt. A car had hit him as he and several friends crossed Delaware Avenue outside the Roxxy nightclub. The impact - he went through the windshield, then into the air and onto the pavement - broke his jaw and several ribs and vertebrae, and left a deep gash in his scalp.
SPORTS
April 3, 1991 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Ben and Charlene Warley were driving through Lower Merion Township last month when they decided to take a detour. They were close to the home of Hal and Mayme Greer - the Warleys' great friends since the mid-'60s, when Ben and Hal were teammates with the Syracuse Nationals, who then became the 76ers - and they figured they would drop in for a surprise visit. "As we got near the house," Ben said, "my wife noticed a 'for-sale' sign. We were saying, 'What's this? What's wrong?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2011
DEAR ABBY: My son's girlfriend is pregnant. I think there is a chance it may not be his, although she claims it is. "Ben" met "Christy," and a little over a week later she announced she was pregnant. She's now at 34 weeks. I have asked him repeatedly if he is sure the baby is his and he says yes, but the math doesn't seem right to me. I have suggested Ben seek a paternity test, but I don't think he's going to take my advice. He has asked Christy to marry him and she accepted.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
As he was helping to put up the tents, Ben kept anxiously asking, "Are we really gonna sleep there?" He had never gone camping in the woods, and he was pretty sure a bear lurked behind every tree, waiting for him to have breakfast. In the morning, Ben, who is 11, marveled at the way the food was cooked, with a grill rack and holes punched in aluminum foil. He ran to get more wood and then sat eating the fried potatoes, bacon and eggs as if they were a feast for the gods. When the squirrels started throwing nuts on his head, his laughter brought happy smiles to his foster parents' faces.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Steven Rea, Columnist
Deep in the forest, by a rippling creek, ringed by the song of birds and the soft crush of animals moving across pine needles and moss, the Cash family reside. It's an idyllic life, but a rigorous one: The father, Ben (Viggo Mortensen), rules over his six kids, testing them on the books they've read ( Middlemarch, The Brothers Karamazov , Karl Marx, Noam Chomsky), leading them on rock climbs and long runs, training them to use a knife to kill and skin deer. Ben teaches his sons and daughters hand-to-hand combat, too - how to use a long, serrated blade on another human.
SPORTS
July 19, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
All eyes will be on Ben Simmons when the 76ers open the season in October, which is natural for the NBA's No. 1 overall draft pick. Folks will want to see if he can duplicate the passing ability he showcased in the Utah Jazz Summer League and the NBA Summer League in Las Vegas. They'll also look to see if the point forward moves better without the ball and improves his shot. There's a chance that fans will see some improvement in those areas, but it would be unrealistic for the 19-year-old to be on an accelerated learning program.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Philly soccer doc When Major League Soccer (MLS) was granting franchises around the country, it overlooked Philly. Local soccer fans were chagrined. But instead of cursing their luck, a small group of dedicated fans banded together to form a group, Sons of Ben, that lobbied hard to get MLS to reconsider our market. Eventually, they helped Philly get its own team, the Philadelphia Union. The work of those valiant few is immortalized in director Jeffrey Bell' s doc, Sons of Ben: The Movie , which will be available July 22 on DVD and all digital and VOD platforms.
SPORTS
July 12, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
LAS VEGAS – For a team to have success in today's NBA, it is imperative to have a great facilitator. The player has to be someone that makes things easy for teammates. He's also the general, the leader, and the quarterback on the squad. In that regard, the 76ers just may be set with Ben Simmons. There are some who believe that the first overall pick needs to shoot the ball more. Others point out that he needs to become more active when the ball is not in his hands. While both are true, the Sixers aren't concerned.
SPORTS
July 12, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
LAS VEGAS - The 76ers missed out on some targeted free agents, but they are working on signing the players they have. Dario Saric, a 2014 draft acquisition, is expected to play for the Sixers this season. Gerald Henderson signed his contract Saturday. The Sixers are expected to sign Jerryd Bayless shortly. Meanwhile, Sergio Rodriguez must pass FIBA clearance and get bought out of his contract before he's able to sign. While all of that is taking shape, the team's prized addition got offensive Sunday in the NBA Summer League.
SPORTS
July 12, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, INQUIRIER COLUMNIST
The atmosphere was amazing even if the basketball was sometimes nauseating. In fact, the first half of the 76ers' first game in the Las Vegas summer league Saturday night against the Los Angeles Lakers looked a lot like the basketball we've seen far too often over the last three seasons at the Wells Fargo Center. Clank, clank, clank went the basketball. The result, of course, did not matter. This was a bunch of incoming rookies and an assortment of other players in the early stages of their NBA careers.
SPORTS
July 5, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
SALT LAKE CITY - It appears that the contract delays for Ben Simmons and Timothe Luwawu-Cabarrot were basically over before they really started. The 76ers rookies arrived Saturday evening, signed their contracts that night, and participated Sunday in two summer league minicamp sessions at the University of Utah's Huntsman Basketball Facility. The pair missed two minicamp practices Saturday while the details of their contracts were being worked out. "It feels so good to be a part of a team and just being on the court," Simmons said Sunday morning after practice.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Tom Wilk, Former Inquirer Copy Editor
  When the Delaware River Bridge opened on July 1, 1926, an estimated 100,000 people crossed the span, taking the opportunity to travel between Philadelphia and Camden without water transportation. They came on foot, not by car, that first day. Ninety years later, the bridge has undergone many changes, starting with its name. The span was renamed the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in 1956 to differentiate it from the Walt Whitman Bridge. Tolls are now one-way and have risen from 25 cents to $5 for cars, with E-ZPass now an option.
SPORTS
July 1, 2016 | By Adam Hermann, STAFF WRITER
WIDE-EYED and attentive, Ben Franklin watches a soccer game from atop his father's shoulders. He's six years old. His full name is Benjamin Franklin Mitchell. His parents, Jeffrey and Rachel, are two of the biggest Union fans you'll find. They named their son after one of the city's biggest icons, but also after the official fan section of the Union, the Sons of Ben, who populate the southern end - the River End - during games. That section at Talen Energy Stadium can reach 3,000; on this, a gorgeous Wednesday night in June, the number is closer to 1,000.
SPORTS
June 28, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Ben Simmons is eager to play with Joel Embiid. He has before: The new 76ers teammates once joined forces in a pickup game in Florida. Simmons, now 19, came to America to attend Montverde Academy (Fla.) for his final three seasons of high school in January 2013. That's where the Australian star met Embiid, who was a senior at The Rock School in Gainesville. They were not high school teammates. Embiid transferred from Montverde after his junior season but made the 98-mile trek back to scrimmage.
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