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Ben Cohen

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BUSINESS
October 24, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Boreanaz, Philly guy and star of TV's Bones , was here catching a flight when he stopped at the Time to Fly kiosk in Philadelphia International Airport's Terminal B and bought a watch. It was a two-minute transaction: Boreanaz, dressed in jeans and sneakers, had been in Philadelphia for the film premiere of The Mighty Macs at the Kimmel Center and to see his family - mother Patti and father Dave Roberts, the former Channel 6 (WPVI-TV) weatherman. Before getting on the plane, Boreanaz bought a $99 G-Shock water-resistant sports watch for his son. "He was looking for something reliable that his son can play sports with, shower, and jump in the pool with, and do anything and everything with," said Ben Cohen, who sells 140 G-Shock styles.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
At Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream Co. in Waterbury, Vt., they have a rule: The salary of the highest-paid person in the company can never be more than seven times the wages of the company's lowest-paid person. At the moment, the CEO of Ben and Jerry's, Ben Cohen, makes $100,000 a year, which is slightly less than seven times that of the lowest-paid employee - a retail clerk in a Ben and Jerry's store, who makes $14,560 annually. "Until last year," said David Barash, the director of human resources for Ben & Jerry's, "the ratio was five to one. We changed it after a lot of internal policy discussion with our employees, because we were having difficulty recruiting and retaining executives.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
ENJOY A STRONG DOSE of protest in a performance, with ice cream for dessert? "Jesus, Bombs and Ice Cream" promises all that. Debuting here tomorrow on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, the event aims to raise awareness about excess militarism in the United States with testimonies from 9/11 and Iraq War survivors, plus more diverting, arts-happening-styled fare. Take the mural to be created live onstage by Scott Erickson, the anti-violent act by world-champion juggler Josh Horton, or the live welding performance by Josh Seitzer to "tie an AK47 in a knot.
NEWS
November 25, 2004 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes all it takes is vision, passion, and a connection to Ben & Jerry's ice cream to do some good in the world. That's really all it came down to for Jesse Brenner, a 23-year-old from Wayne who has merged his interests in world music and social justice to aid the refugees of war-torn Sudan. Brenner, a senior at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, along with classmate Eric Herman, founded Modiba Productions, a nonprofit that produces and promotes African music. And in a huge coup this week, Modiba released its first album - ASAP: The Afrobeat Sudan Aid Project, an all-star compilation of Afrobeat artists - as a digital download through iTunes.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Ivelys Figueroa and Victor Chen Daily News Staff Writers The Associated Press contributed to this report
Yesterday, a call to 1-800-225-DEAD, the hot line for Grateful Dead Merchandising, yielded a recording. "In respect to Jerry's passing, Grateful Dead will not be accepting orders until Aug. 14. Please feel free to call back then. Stay in touch," the voice says. With up to 4,500 orders a month, you may be hearing the Grateful Dead's biggest tribute of all to deceased band founder Jerry Garcia. In 1993 alone, Grateful Dead concert ticket, record, and merchandise sales garnered a reported $60 million.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a recent weekday afternoon, Ben Cohen and Teodozia Pepe strolled the grounds of Fluehr Park, a somewhat polluted but nevertheless promising parcel of land on Grant Avenue near Interstate 95. The two friends pointed out the park's highlights - including 10 baseball fields - and low points, among them abandoned cars and a wide assortment of litter. Occasionally, they paused to recruit a new member for their fledgling group, the Friends of Fluehr Park. The 62-acre park has been a source of grief for the residents of East Torresdale.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | By Ken Dilanian, Special to The Inquirer
Environmentally sound consumer products, from laundry detergent to trash bags to Ben & Jerry's ice cream, have been a fixture on supermarket shelves for some time now. One kind of green begets another, corporate America has found. But it was just a month ago that the Philadelphia area became home to a new, if inevitable, concept: the green retailer. Environmental Package Deal, a small store in the Plymouth Meeting Mall, sells not a particular product line, but an ethic. "People crave this stuff," said the store's owner, Marty Hahn of Norristown, who liquidated his office supply store to assemble an environmentally related inventory.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ben Cohen, who founded the Friends of Pennypack Park two years ago, is stepping down as the group's president. Cohen has announced that he will relinquish his post as head of the park advocacy group in June to devote more time to personal and business interests. However, he will remain on the board of directors of the 600-member volunteer group, he said Monday. "I did some numbers a while back, and I average about 40 hours a week working on park things," said Cohen, 58, who runs a property management firm from his Benton Street home, which borders the park.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | By Eils Lotozo, Special to The Inquirer
The first thing Ben Cohen makes clear is that he doesn't think this story should be about him. As chairman of Friends of the Pennypack, he would much rather discuss the activities of the advocacy group than talk about himself. "There are so many people who are working hard in the organization. I don't like the idea of focusing on me," he says. Instead, the white-haired Bustleton resident insists that his story is no different than stories of others who loved the park, got angry at its deterioration and were moved to action.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 65, Judy Wicks has reached a sometimes stamina-challenged age - yet another reason the pioneering Philadelphia entrepreneur should relish her new career as an author. Granted, it will soon involve an exhaustive run of signings of her memoir, Good Morning, Beautiful Business , due in stores April 3. But at least Wicks won't have to sprint through the streets chasing thieves. As a West Philadelphia shop owner in the 1970s, she did that a few times - including catching up with a knife-wielding teen who had stuffed a stack of shirts under the one he was wearing before bolting from Free People's Store.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 11, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 65, Judy Wicks has reached a sometimes stamina-challenged age - yet another reason the pioneering Philadelphia entrepreneur should relish her new career as an author. Granted, it will soon involve an exhaustive run of signings of her memoir, Good Morning, Beautiful Business , due in stores April 3. But at least Wicks won't have to sprint through the streets chasing thieves. As a West Philadelphia shop owner in the 1970s, she did that a few times - including catching up with a knife-wielding teen who had stuffed a stack of shirts under the one he was wearing before bolting from Free People's Store.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2011 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Boreanaz, Philly guy and star of TV's Bones , was here catching a flight when he stopped at the Time to Fly kiosk in Philadelphia International Airport's Terminal B and bought a watch. It was a two-minute transaction: Boreanaz, dressed in jeans and sneakers, had been in Philadelphia for the film premiere of The Mighty Macs at the Kimmel Center and to see his family - mother Patti and father Dave Roberts, the former Channel 6 (WPVI-TV) weatherman. Before getting on the plane, Boreanaz bought a $99 G-Shock water-resistant sports watch for his son. "He was looking for something reliable that his son can play sports with, shower, and jump in the pool with, and do anything and everything with," said Ben Cohen, who sells 140 G-Shock styles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
ENJOY A STRONG DOSE of protest in a performance, with ice cream for dessert? "Jesus, Bombs and Ice Cream" promises all that. Debuting here tomorrow on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, the event aims to raise awareness about excess militarism in the United States with testimonies from 9/11 and Iraq War survivors, plus more diverting, arts-happening-styled fare. Take the mural to be created live onstage by Scott Erickson, the anti-violent act by world-champion juggler Josh Horton, or the live welding performance by Josh Seitzer to "tie an AK47 in a knot.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The World Cafe has hosted a lot of wild and crazy events, but seldom has it hosted anything like Jesus, Bombs, & Ice Cream , which strikes up at 7 p.m. Saturday. Jesus? Bombs? Ice cream? All in one breath? Well, yes, and that's the point. An impressive and surprising coalition of folks will be on hand to perform, present, and play. They're taking aim at the epidemic of violence in U.S. society, drawing a special bead on the Pentagon budget. Ben Cohen, the Ben of Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream, will be there.
NEWS
November 25, 2004 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes all it takes is vision, passion, and a connection to Ben & Jerry's ice cream to do some good in the world. That's really all it came down to for Jesse Brenner, a 23-year-old from Wayne who has merged his interests in world music and social justice to aid the refugees of war-torn Sudan. Brenner, a senior at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, along with classmate Eric Herman, founded Modiba Productions, a nonprofit that produces and promotes African music. And in a huge coup this week, Modiba released its first album - ASAP: The Afrobeat Sudan Aid Project, an all-star compilation of Afrobeat artists - as a digital download through iTunes.
NEWS
January 24, 2003 | By James M. O'Neill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Bob Roberts first took over something called the Ice Cream Short Course at Pennsylvania State University a few years back, he got a call from an Oregon man with desperation in his voice. "I have to take your course," the man said. "You have to?" responded Roberts, who had yet to fully grasp the course's reputation among ice cream makers. It turns out the caller was trying to expand his coffee shop into an ice cream parlor. "My bank won't sign my loan unless I take the course," he fretted.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2001 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry's Homemade ice cream fame is bringing his blend of business enterprise and social activism to a small Norristown maker of nontoxic household cleaners. Cohen's Barred Rock venture-fund plans to announce today that it and a Philadelphia partner paid $800,000 to buy Sun & Earth Inc., which makes laundry detergent, dish-washing liquid, liquid soap, and all-purpose cleaner out of orange and coconut oils. Cohen started the nonprofit Barred Rock fund with $5 million of the estimated $40 million he received from last year's $326 million sale of Ben & Jerry's to Unilever NV, the giant Anglo-Dutch consumer-products conglomerate.
LIVING
January 24, 2000 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the name of all that is groovy, people will take to the streets in eight American cities tomorrow to protest the possible sale of the Ben & Jerry's ice cream company to a multinational corporation. Outside scoop shops, people in shark costumes will "attack" folks dressed like cows, the pastoral symbol of the Vermont-based Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc. The metaphor is clever and clear: Faceless, suited, wing-tipped toers of the bottom line are hungry to gobble up the ice cream company, founded by socially active hippies who give away 7.5 percent of pretax profits to help children, the homeless, the environment, the impoverished.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ben, the cherubic, bearded visionary, is fantasizing out loud about dream ice cream flavors, like chocolate Cointreau fudge. Or coffee almond coconut fudge. Or cantaloupe! "Didn't we make cantaloupe once?" he asks his partner. "In the old gas station?" Jerry, the leaner, quieter pragmatist, remembers. "Cantaloupe is hard," he says. "You have to remove all the seeds, and the juice is so watery. It's hard to get enough flavor. " For a few minutes last night, in the Center City Marriott, it was like old times for Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, founders of Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc.: When they were just two guys with a dream, cranking out all-natural, super-rich ice cream flavors made from the milk of local cows, in a rock-salt freezer in a refurbished gas station in Vermont.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Ivelys Figueroa and Victor Chen Daily News Staff Writers The Associated Press contributed to this report
Yesterday, a call to 1-800-225-DEAD, the hot line for Grateful Dead Merchandising, yielded a recording. "In respect to Jerry's passing, Grateful Dead will not be accepting orders until Aug. 14. Please feel free to call back then. Stay in touch," the voice says. With up to 4,500 orders a month, you may be hearing the Grateful Dead's biggest tribute of all to deceased band founder Jerry Garcia. In 1993 alone, Grateful Dead concert ticket, record, and merchandise sales garnered a reported $60 million.
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