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Benazir Bhutto

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NEWS
December 28, 2007
Benazir Bhutto was assassinated yesterday during a suicide attack that included bursts of gunfire and a bomb blast that left the former Pakistani prime minister mortally wounded. Also a casualty was the Bush administration's foreign policy, which had placed its hopes for stability in Pakistan on a political marriage of convenience between Bhutto and Pervez Musharraf, president of the southwest Asian nation. News reports said Bhutto was shot in the neck and chest after having the rooftop hatch of her car opened so she could wave to the crowd after a rally.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benazir Bhutto, the deposed prime minister of Pakistan, made her first stop ever in Philadelphia yesterday to promote her long-shot crusade to return to power. The Western-trained Bhutto served two turbulent terms until she fell in a 1996 coup, and she is perhaps the most famous Muslim woman in the world. Her host here was the evangelical Christian group Urban Family Council. The lobby group's president, William Devlin, brought Bhutto to town as part of his campaign against persecution of the Christian minority by the current Pakistani military regime.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
BENAZIR BHUTTO wasn't a saint. Like most politicians in the world, she was deeply flawed. Corruption and other problems dogged her during her two terms as prime minister of one of the world's most strategically important nations, Pakistan. But in the end, she became a hero . . . and a martyr for democracy. As the heiress of a wealthy family, she could have lived a comfortable life in exile anywhere in the globe. Instead, knowing that her life would be in danger, she chose to return to Pakistan to fight for democracy and against dictatorial rule by ruler Pervez Musharraf.
NEWS
February 6, 2008 | By Arlen Specter
Benazir Bhutto's assassination was an extraordinary shock to me because Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D., R.I.) and I were scheduled to meet with her three hours later in Islamabad. It took my thoughts to JFK's assassination, my previous meetings with her when she was prime minister, and the devastating loss to Pakistan of a vibrant leader who had the potential to unify and stabilize the tottering nation. From my work on the Warren Commission staff, I was immediately troubled by the failure of the local authorities to secure the crime scene.
NEWS
January 3, 1989
At a time when new openings for peace seem to be proliferating, none is more filled with symbolism and drama than the first meeting last week between Benazir Bhutto and Rajiv Gandhi. Ms. Bhutto, 35, and Mr. Gandhi, 44, are the youthful prime ministers of Pakistan and India - both democratically elected and yet both a kind of royalty. His mother and her father, also prime ministers, presided over a period of intense hostility between two nations that have despised each other from birth.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | Daily News wire services
ISLAMABADn BHUTTO WINS PAKISTAN VOTE In a surprising victory, Benazir Bhutto defeated her conservative opponent in national elections today to bring the prime minister's post she lost three years ago once again within her grasp. Yesterday's election marks an impressive comeback by Bhutto, who remains the most charismatic figure in Pakistan. With results tallied in all but a handful of the 217 election districts, state television showed Bhutto's Pakistan People's Party with an insurmountable lead of 83 seats to 69 for the Pakistan Moslem League, led by millionaire industrialist Nawaz Sharif.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Time, Benazir Bhutto said late last year, was on her side. Time, for whose passage she had previously shown little patience, would be her ally as she mounted opposition in Pakistan to the government of President Mohammad Zia ul-Haq. But yesterday, with the death of Zia, the time frame that Bhutto had in mind for avenging Zia's 1979 execution of her father and assuming the leadership of Pakistan instantly accelerated, giving her a clearer path to the top. "Whatever should have been done, has been done," Bhutto said of Zia's death.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The huge crowds - dancing, chanting, intoxicated with emotion - just wouldn't let her pass. It already had taken Benazir Bhutto almost three hours to travel less than four miles along the frenzied main road of Rawalpindi last week - she perched atop a wildly decorated truck while thousands and thousands of supporters swarmed all around her chanting "Bhutto, Bhutto, Prime Minister Bhutto. " Now the truck reached the gate of Liaquat Bagh, the historic park where the beautiful, high-born lady many Pakistanis hope will soon be their new leader was to address another huge throng.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the eve of Pakistan's first unfettered general election in 11 years, acting President Ghulam Ishaq Khan sternly warned the country's political leaders yesterday against any attempts to disrupt the election or overturn its results through street protests. Asserting that the election would be the most fairly administered in Pakistan's history, Ishaq Khan said in a television address: "I want to warn in clear words that the losers will never be allowed to overturn their defeat through fake claims of rigging and fraud . . . to change the verdict through show of force on the streets.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | BY JACK McKINNEY
Benazir Bhutto of Pakistan is not like some unschooled goatherd just back from the auction with a sack of rupees, ripe to be taken by the first hustler who happens along. She is prime minister of a country almost twice the size of California, with a population of 125 million, who was an honor student at Radcliffe College and Oxford University. But the comely visitor in custom robes has had a rotten run of luck in money matters lately. First she gave Winnie Mandela a donation of $150,000 for the Women's League of the African National Congress, only to learn the estranged wife of South African President Nelson Mandela diverted the windfall into her own private foundation.
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NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Benazir Bhutto's ghost hovers over Saturday's elections for parliament in Pakistan. The face of the gutsy former prime minister, who was assassinated as she campaigned in Pakistan's last national elections, still adorns commercials of her Pakistan People's Party. (It won in 2008, but is failing this time). What is missing in this campaign is Bhutto's plea for Pakistan to confront its Taliban problem before the group undermines the state and society. I was in Pakistan at the time and can't forget her passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Some Pakistanis wept at Benazir Bhutto's birth in 1953, grieving that the firstborn of (future prime minister) Zulfikar Ali Bhutto was not a boy. Much of the nation wept when Benazir, a two-term prime minister and the first woman elected to lead a Muslim state, was assassinated in 2007 while leaving a campaign rally in support of her third run for office. Part biography, part idol worship, Bhutto is a bullet train through South Asia, chronicling its subject's 54 years, a period of unrest in her nation and family.
NEWS
February 6, 2008 | By Arlen Specter
Benazir Bhutto's assassination was an extraordinary shock to me because Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D., R.I.) and I were scheduled to meet with her three hours later in Islamabad. It took my thoughts to JFK's assassination, my previous meetings with her when she was prime minister, and the devastating loss to Pakistan of a vibrant leader who had the potential to unify and stabilize the tottering nation. From my work on the Warren Commission staff, I was immediately troubled by the failure of the local authorities to secure the crime scene.
NEWS
January 3, 2008
WE WERE all shocked and saddened to learn of the assassination of Pakistani former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. While looking at the latest news breaking on TV and the Internet, I was exposed to many bothersome images, not the least of which was George W. Bush crying crocodile tears for the fallen prime minister from his vacation ranch. Has anyone ever bothered to ask why, after these years, President Bush has been unable to capture bin Laden? All anybody would have to do is look into the past dealings of the Bush family and see that there has been more than one piece of business completed with members of the bin Laden clan.
NEWS
December 30, 2007
Expertise available The assassination of Benazir Bhutto has focused our attention on the critical need of this country to have a president who is immensely knowledgeable about foreign affairs ("Pakistan in Crisis," Dec. 28). Our security is significantly dependent upon our leader's ability to correctly interpret the significance of international events. The current field of presidential candidates, with the exception of two individuals, is sorely lacking in international expertise.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
BENAZIR BHUTTO wasn't a saint. Like most politicians in the world, she was deeply flawed. Corruption and other problems dogged her during her two terms as prime minister of one of the world's most strategically important nations, Pakistan. But in the end, she became a hero . . . and a martyr for democracy. As the heiress of a wealthy family, she could have lived a comfortable life in exile anywhere in the globe. Instead, knowing that her life would be in danger, she chose to return to Pakistan to fight for democracy and against dictatorial rule by ruler Pervez Musharraf.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
Benazir Bhutto was assassinated yesterday during a suicide attack that included bursts of gunfire and a bomb blast that left the former Pakistani prime minister mortally wounded. Also a casualty was the Bush administration's foreign policy, which had placed its hopes for stability in Pakistan on a political marriage of convenience between Bhutto and Pervez Musharraf, president of the southwest Asian nation. News reports said Bhutto was shot in the neck and chest after having the rooftop hatch of her car opened so she could wave to the crowd after a rally.
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | By Tristan Mabry
The death of Benazir Bhutto triggered outbursts of pain and protest in Pakistan, but although President Pervez Musharraf declared three days of mourning, it is entirely misguided to believe that her assassination is being mourned by most Pakistanis. While Islamabad and Washington are quick to blame the Islamists, who almost certainly orchestrated the actual attack, some of the country's secular elites are celebrating her demise. The dividing line between the mourners and the merry is an ethnic one. As the world's first Islamic republic threatens to implode (again)
NEWS
December 28, 2007 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benazir Bhutto's assassination rocked the Philadelphia area, too, where several Pakistani Americans interviewed yesterday said they learned of it in morning phone calls from friends in Islamabad, Rawalpindi and Lahore. Victor Gill, 56, a registered nurse who described himself as a human-rights activist and sympathizer with Bhutto's Pakistan People's Party, said the former prime minister was a charismatic leader and friend. They met six years ago at her home-in-exile in Dubai.
NEWS
November 11, 2007 | By Trudy Rubin
The next few weeks, or maybe days, will determine the fate of Pakistan - a country containing both Islamist terrorist groups and nukes. This is the quintessential post-9/11 nightmare. A military dictator losing his grip, with local cells of Pakistani Taliban and al-Qaeda poised to take advantage. No wonder Gen. Pervez Musharraf thought the White House would have to back a dictator over a restoration of constitutional rule. After all, President Bush has ditched his democracy pitch in Arab countries like Egypt, where he's bought the argument that only a strongman can hold back the Islamists.
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