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Benefit

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NEWS
April 27, 2006
IAPPLAUD James Nevels, Paul Vallas and Pat Gillespie for the historic moves on union apprenticeships for the city's students. Hold the students to the rigor and discipline needed to succeed. They will appreciate the training being offered and, in the long run, will feel a sense of self-worth and pride. Sharon Hale-Jenkins Philadelphia
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / BEVERLY SCHAEFER
A benefit to help the Oxford Neighborhood Center was held Sunday at Manuel Rivero Hall at Lincoln University. The Lincoln University Dance Troupe and Gospel Ensemble, as well as the Makumba Drummers, performed. Also featured at the event were a student fashion show and a synchronized-swimming exhibition.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | Inquirer Correspondent / JON ADAMS
They ran, shuffled and strolled for the Muscular Dystrophy Association last Sunday in the Sesame Place Classic. There was a 6.2-mile run, a 1-mile run, a 1-mile walk and a 100-yard sprint for children. Although the race is in its 11th year, 1992 is the first year that proceeds will benefit MDA, which provides orthopedic and respiratory care, therapy and transportation, and supports research.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cinderella, Dressed in yellow, Went upstairs to kiss her fellow. Made a mistake, Kissed a snake. How many doctors did it take? One, two, three . . . Jump, jump, jump. With 50 ropes swinging, 300 youngsters skipped to the steady beats of rhymes recently. Principal Henry Carroll called the jump-rope-a-thon at the Thomas Holme Elementary School a "joyful, happy, exciting" occasion. In the school's yard at Academy and Willits Roads, first through fifth graders skipped to their hearts' - and feet's - content in a two-hour fund- raising marathon.
SPORTS
July 11, 2013
ON MEMORIAL DAY, former West Chester fullback Brian McDermott (Harriton High) was involved in an automobile accident in which he lost his left leg below the knee. So his football family is trying to do what it can to help the Golden Rams' 2011 captain begin to get on with his recovery. "He's a great kid from a great family," said coach Bill Zwann. "And they have a tough road ahead, especially financially. " On July 21, from 2-6 p.m., there will be a benefit at The Great American Pub in Conshohocken.
NEWS
September 8, 2011
Nine-year-old Jorge Cartagena, who lost his eyesight in June when he was hit by a stray bullet on a Camden street, will benefit from a fund-raiser to be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday at Millennium Skate World, 1900 Carman St., Camden. Half of the $5 admission will go toward the cost of skate rentals; the rest will go to a fund for Jorge. He starts Thursday at Bankbridge Elementary School in Sewell, Gloucester County. To see photos, video, and a previous Inquirer story about Jorge, go to: www.philly.com/jorge . - April Saul
NEWS
April 10, 2005 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attention all who are affianced: Here's a little something to help you get through the wedding planning. The area's top pastry chefs will compete in a wedding-cake contest from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Park Hyatt Philadelphia. "Let Them Eat Cake" is the brainchild of Queen of Hearts wedding planner Mark Kingsdorf and features traditional, ethnic, fantasy and seasonal cakes from both professionals and students. Judges from local culinary schools and wedding organizations will rate the entries in nine categories, among them most artistic, best overall design, and of course, best tasting.
NEWS
August 1, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey voters will decide in November whether judges should contribute more toward their pensions and benefits, after the Legislature overwhelmingly passed a measure Monday during a special summer session. The Senate voted 28-0 in favor, and the Assembly voted 62-3, clearing the three-fifths majority required for a constitutional amendment to be placed on the ballot. Gov. Christie praised the swift action. "Rarely has the public seen such unanimity between the legislative and executive branches that the judicial branch was dead wrong," he said in a statement.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
What if the state income tax clipped from your paycheck were delivered not to your elected government for roads and other basic services, but to your out-of-state employer, to keep? A proposal to allow that - for companies that plan to move to Pennsylvania to hire workers - is advancing toward Gov. Corbett's signature. The bill is sponsored by State Rep. Kerry Benninghoff (R., Centre)   . He didn't call back last week or Wednesday to talk about his bill, which is cosponsored by seven Republicans from the Pennsylvania suburbs, among others.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A CERTAIN sense of peace can be found in a small hardware store, even among the razor knives and sledgehammers, when the mysteries of caulking and angle cuts are revealed and customers light up with joy, extending spackle-covered hands in gratitude. At Rittenhouse Hardware, at 20th and Pine streets, Joe Snyder is one of those guys who can transform your day with the right part, or at the very least rig something up to make your day a little better. Snyder's one part of a small crew at Rittenhouse, about a half-dozen men and one French bulldog named Louie in a corduroy vest, whose bonds are tighter than liquid cement, forged by cracking jokes and coffee runs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
They came for Eli. Hundreds of food lovers and dozens of chefs helped raise more than $130,000 Thursday night at a fund-raiser at Fork Restaurant for Eli Kulp, one of the city's most promising and celebrated chefs, who was paralyzed in the May 12 crash of Amtrak Train 188. Thursday night's benefit - with $25,000 in donations from a silent auction - will be combined with $49,000 raised previously to help offset medical expenses for Kulp, 37,...
SPORTS
July 10, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
THERE'S ONLY so much new Flyers coach Dave Hakstol can see when he looks at video from last season. That's not an indictment of how poorly the Flyers played; it's more about Hakstol's method of evaluation. And if Hakstol isn't forming opinions of returning players based on their play on a television screen, there will be a whole lot of healthy competition when the team hits the ice at training camp. "You can overanalyze things," Hakstol said. "I'll be blunt. That's why I think I want to be careful about how much video [I watch]
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigators have finished a probe expected to identify the employees responsible for pervasive problems at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs benefits office, but say they aren't releasing the findings while the agency is considering disciplinary action. VA officials on Monday said the report, completed last Tuesday, is being withheld to protect the due process rights of the employees involved. "Decisions on each issue, including any appropriate disciplinary actions, will be made in accordance with applicable due process procedures," VA spokesman James Hutton said in a statement.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Duncan said he doesn't want you to drive far to see his staff if you live in southern Chester County. So Duncan, the president and CEO of Chester County Hospital & Health System, recently opened a $28 million medical facility in West Grove. The addition came after a 2010 study showed that many southern Chester County residents were forced to travel out of their areas for health services. That indicated to Chester County Hospital that there was a need for more physicians in the West Grove area.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last year, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office dropped subpoenas on dozens of nursing homes statewide, demanding facts about their staffing - an opening salvo in a probe that could force the homes to pay big fines. The office says the process will improve conditions and pay off for the state's elderly. Someone else could benefit, too - the Cohen, Milstein, Sellers & Toll law firm. The Washington firm stands to pocket up to $21 million of the first $100 million of any fines extracted by state prosecutors.
REAL_ESTATE
May 17, 2015 | By Jack Guttentag, For The Inquirer
Question: Lenders made bad loans during the years prior to the financial crisis because the loans could be sold as securities to unwary investors. Would most mortgage borrowers be better off if there were no secondary market in which to sell mortgages? Answer: Some might, but most would not. Largely because of secondary markets, a knowledgeable and creditworthy home buyer in the United States pays a rate only modestly higher than that charged to the U.S. government. The rate spread between home mortgages and government bonds is lower in the U.S. than anywhere else in the world, with the possible exception of the U.K. and Denmark, which also have secondary mortgage markets.
SPORTS
May 5, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
MIAMI - The Phillies' pitching staff has walked 103 batters in 26 games this season; that is 10 more than the next closest team. The relief corps has issued 47 of those walks in 80 1/3 innings; that's also the most in baseball. The pitchers have been talked to about it. There have been meetings. But eventually the guys with the ball in their hands have to make it happen. Justin De Fratus did just that in a big spot yesterday afternoon. After the Phillies took a 3-2 lead in the top of the sixth in Miami, De Fratus charged out of the bullpen and needed just 10 pitches to blitz through the meat of the Marlins' batting order.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - A top Veterans Affairs investigator said Wednesday that the department's probe of employees at the Philadelphia benefits office is ongoing and that the embattled site will not improve without new leadership. Going beyond the scathing report issued by her office last week, Assistant Inspector General Linda Halliday told a congressional committee that the Philadelphia office needs "a culture change" if it is to improve its service to veterans. Of all the VA regional offices, "Philadelphia is clearly the most problematic," Halliday told the House Committee on Veterans Affairs as a handful of Philadelphia-based whistle-blowers watched from the gallery.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SCIENCE AND MATH teacher Jason Bui knew a few years back that he wanted to start an after-school chess club at S. Weir Mitchell Elementary, at 55th Street and Kingsessing Avenue, in Kingsessing. The pupils who joined the club - which he named the Minor Threats after the early-'80s hard-core punk band Minor Threat - had no idea that chess would have an impact on their minds, their attitudes and their families. "By the time we were the Minor Threats, I was already seeing an impact," said Bui, 33, who this year moved to Andrew Hamilton Elementary, on Spruce Street near 56th, West Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As Gov. Christie pushes to overhaul public worker benefits, some teachers are waging a counterattack - with Twitter hashtags. Earlier this week, teachers took to social media, demanding that the governor and state lawmakers #fundnjpension. "I made my pension payment today. Did you?" many of the tweets read. Teachers sent the messages on Monday, a payday, when pension contributions are automatically withdrawn from their paychecks. The online offensive was supported by the New Jersey Education Association, which retweeted more than 200 of the messages.
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