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Benefit Performance

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NEWS
January 28, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Deaf poet Peter Cook encourages Randy Spann to express with his face as Joseph Conard watches at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf in Germantown. Cook, who has performed around the country, is visiting through Feb. 8 to help students and teachers explore American Sign Language. He will present a benefit performance Friday. For more information on the benefit or the workshops, call 215-951-4720.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Once upon a time there was a queen so mean the sun stopped shining and the flowers died in her kingdom. Her subjects decided that something had to be done. Their efforts to bring happiness back to the land are presented in Sunshine for the Queen, a children's play written by Jeanne Davis Glynn. The play will be presented twice, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday, by the Village Playbox, a Haddon Heights theater group. It will be performed at the Haddon Heights Municipal Building, on Station Avenue.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After church on Sunday, Aaron Graham, 12, bolted down his lunch, eager to get out and practice kicking goals with some of his soccer buddies. A horseshoe-shaped scar etched into the back of his head was the only sign that just two weeks earlier Graham, a seventh grader at Welsh Valley Middle School, had been released from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, where he had surgery for a recurring brain tumor. "I don't want you running around," warned his mother, Loretta, as Aaron flew down the stairs, wearing the bike helmet he always wears now when he plays outside.
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During her fight against Hodgkin's disease, Eileen Zucker Horn realized she wouldn't be around to care for her children as they grew up. So she started making plans; she wanted to ensure that her children could get a good education and go on to college. Before she died in July, Horn, who was 32 and lived in Bensalem, asked friends and family to help her fulfill that goal by setting up a trust fund for her two children's college education. Now those friends hope to build up the trust fund, set up by Horn's parents, with a benefit performance Oct. 28 of the musical comedy Alive and Kicking.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1999 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Group Motion Company tackled another big subject with its new multimedia dance work, Spaces, last weekend at the Painted Bride Art Center: the impact of technology on our social spaces. With Tobin Rothlein's strong video sequences layered over or counterpointing the action, this evening-length piece succeeded in generating some trenchant, thought-provoking moments. Director Manfred Fischbeck, as a uniformed elevator man, opened Saturday's performance and introduced the unifying image, a crowd of barely interacting souls on an elevator (a video sequence that returned between dance segments)
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Cheryl Squadrito, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Ridley Park native Bruce Graham's comedy Moon Over The Brewery will be running at his home town's Barnstormers Theater over the next two weekends. Graham has dabbled in many different aspects of the arts, including stand- up comedy, playwriting, acting and screenwriting. Last year, Graham accepted an award from the Princess Grace Foundation that included a $5,000 grant. Moon Over The Brewery is about a protective 13-year-old girl and her relationship with her mother, who is a waitress.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Once upon a time there was a queen so mean the sun stopped shining and the flowers died in her kingdom. Her subjects decided that something had to be done. Their efforts to bring happiness back to the land are presented in Sunshine for the Queen, a children's play written by Jeanne Davis Glynn. The play will be presented twice, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday, by the Village Playbox, a Haddon Heights theater group. It will be performed at the Haddon Heights Municipal Building, on Station Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1986 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to the Inquirer
Max van Egmond, a Dutch baritone, sang as the guest artist of Serenata in their benefit performance of baroque music last night at the Church of the Saviour. The concert on antique instruments benefited the American Musicological Society's fellowship program, and it will be repeated at Princeton University's Alexander Hall tonight. Amateurs and scholars alike would profit from venturing up to Princeton for the event, for such a combination of musicality and scholarship is rare.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Tri-County Concerts will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a benefit performance at 6 p.m. Saturday at Centennial Hall, the Haverford School, 450 Lancaster Ave. Pianist Rosalyn Tureck, known internationally for her prolific interpretations of Bach, will headline the benefit. Other artists performing include the Metropolitan Opera's Norman Anderson of Malvern, violinist Timothy Baker, pianist James Barbagallo, pianist Marcantonio Barone of Bryn Mawr, flutist Deborah Carter of Havertown, pianist Fei-Ping Hsu and cellist Alan Stepansky.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 25, 2013
IF YOU CAN measure a person's fortune by his or her friends, then Ed Shockley may be one of Philadelphia's richest people. Shockley, who turns 56 Saturday, is the award-winning author of about 80 plays. In September, he suffered a serious stroke. While his physical rehabilitation has proceeded apace, he is still suffering some cognitive and communication problems that have seriously cut into his ability to earn income and pay bills. Saturday, a number of his friends in the local theater community are rallying at Queen Village's Shubin Theatre to celebrate Shockley's career and, more importantly, raise some money to help relieve the financial pressures he's facing.
NEWS
March 22, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Fifteen years ago, after AIDS invaded the dance world, a group of Pennsylvania Ballet dancers wanted to use their talents to help out - but how? They talked and talked, until one of them suggested they just "shut up and dance. " Which they did, in the form of a benefit performance, Shut Up and Dance, but with a twist: The dancers produced the show, and did all the choreography, something most had not done before. The money raised went to Manna, an organization begun two years earlier to provide meals to people who were suffering from HIV and AIDS.
NEWS
June 22, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once again, the stars are coming out to support a cause. This time it's the Live 8 global pop-music concert extravaganza, here and in eight other cities on July 2, that seeks to galvanize public support for combating African poverty. It comes 20 years after Live Aid, the all-star benefit shows here and in London that raised $180.7 million (in today's dollars) to aid African famine relief. Both productions are in the long show-business tradition of involvement in humanitarian, social and political issues, from helping workers organize to helping candidates get elected.
NEWS
August 15, 2004 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"When someone is in need, the best way for a theater to help is to put on a show," said Ron Quirk of the Barley Sheaf Players. "That's what we do best. " So that is what the Lionville theater group has done. With entertainment ranging from comedy to show tunes to a little bit of gospel music, a benefit for a longtime theater member will be held Saturday night at Downingtown East High School. Barley Sheaf will offer a preview of its September show, Side by Side by Sondheim, a tribute to the lyrics and music of Stephen Sondheim.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Carl Reiner, the comic actor, writer and director who has been entertaining since the 1950s, will give a benefit performance at 8 p.m. Sunday at Congregation Adath Jeshurun in Elkins Park. The program, "Laughter is the Best Medicine," is a rare opportunity to see the 12-time Emmy Award winner in a personal stage setting. Reiner most recently appeared in the movie Ocean's Eleven. Ticket prices range from $50 to $65. Adults older than 65 will be admitted for $36. For tickets or more information, call 215-635-6611.
NEWS
August 7, 2001 | By Miriam Seidel FOR THE INQUIRER
The ballet rehearsal is in progress. The stage in the darkened theater is lit, but the only thing moving is Tara Keating's hand. Sitting on a folding chair, she advances her flattened palm slowly away from her face, then gently exhales over it, as if to scatter imaginary dandelion fluff. All this is caught on the digital video camera mounted just a few feet away, manned by filmmaker Tobin Rothlein. In the finished ballet, he explains later, Keating's large-scale projected hand and face will seem to blow the real dancers across the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1999 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
The language of movement may be international. But, as three Korean choreographers showed last weekend at the Painted Bride, modern and even postmodern dance can be spoken with refreshingly distinctive accents in different countries. In-young Sohn, from a traditional Korean dance background, has also worked in New York. Her first solo (choreographed by American Claire Porter) drew parallels between the heavy work boots she danced in, and the struggle to communicate in her second language, English.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1999 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Group Motion Company tackled another big subject with its new multimedia dance work, Spaces, last weekend at the Painted Bride Art Center: the impact of technology on our social spaces. With Tobin Rothlein's strong video sequences layered over or counterpointing the action, this evening-length piece succeeded in generating some trenchant, thought-provoking moments. Director Manfred Fischbeck, as a uniformed elevator man, opened Saturday's performance and introduced the unifying image, a crowd of barely interacting souls on an elevator (a video sequence that returned between dance segments)
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
At 8 p.m. Saturday, a number of local dancers and choreographers will hit the stage of the Forrest Theater, 114 Walnut St., in "Shut Up & Dance," a benefit performance to raise funds for the Metropolitan AIDS Neighborhood Nutrition Alliance - a/k/a MANNA - which takes meals to homebound people with HIV and AIDS. Meredith Rainey, a member of the Pennsylvania Ballet corps, is among those who have choreographed pieces for this event. He's been involved in the all-volunteer project since its inception in 1993.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Deaf poet Peter Cook encourages Randy Spann to express with his face as Joseph Conard watches at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf in Germantown. Cook, who has performed around the country, is visiting through Feb. 8 to help students and teachers explore American Sign Language. He will present a benefit performance Friday. For more information on the benefit or the workshops, call 215-951-4720.
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