CollectionsBenny Goodman
IN THE NEWS

Benny Goodman

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
Fans of the late swingman won't want to miss WPEN's (950 AM) "A Swingin' Saturday with Benny Goodman" on March. 21. The program will be highlighted from 12 to 3 p.m. by "The Benny Goodman Story," a three-hour special featuring conversations with Goodman, including the premiere broadcast of his last radio interview. ALMOST HOME With six days remaining, WHYY Channel 12 has reached about half of its $1.2 million dollar goal, netting $580,793 so far in its March fund-raising drive "Your Pledge Counts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Suddenly, the resonance is gone. A 77-year-old man takes to his couch for an afternoon nap and never wakes up, and a whole generation catches its breath at the news. Benny Goodman was an exceptional musician and a landmark bandleader, but to many Americans he was much more. He represented a glorious if temporary release for the generation born not long after World War I, a hard-luck lot reared in various degrees of privation during the Great Depression and relieved of the onus just in time to plunge headlong into the 2nd World War. He was an enduring symbol of that wretched though colorful era whose survivors, of whom I am one, are blessed with long and virtually inexhaustible memories.
LIVING
March 9, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The announcer gets right to the point: "Ladies and gentlemen, the King of Swing, Benny Goodman . . . " The hot Goodman Big Band kicks off with "Let's Dance," which is appropriate. The tune is Goodman's theme song, and it establishes the tone for much of Benny Goodman: Let's Dance, A Musical Tribute, to be aired at 9:05 p.m. Saturday on WHYY-TV (Channel 12). Goodman and his musical delegation have settled in for a night of joy - not to mention nostalgia - at the New York Marriott Marquis.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Jazz Columnist
There are televised big band era tributes and then there are televised big band era tributes, and most of both kinds come to our house and yours about this time of year, when Public Television puts on its Al Jolson eyes and clatters to its knees and reminds us how grateful we all should be for our weekly rations of Jacques Cousteau, Marty Stauffer and assorted sharks, dolphins, chimps, penguins, wallabies, hyenas and mountain goats. This time I am pleased to say I have a winner for you. "Benny Goodman: Let's Dance - A Musical Tribute" airs on Channel 12 at 9:05 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Benny Goodman, the jazz clarinetist who ushered in the swing era and set America dancing to a new beat, died yesterday of an apparent heart attack in his apartment. He was 77. Known universally as the "King of Swing," Goodman made a major mark on jazz with more than music. He was the first to racially integrate his bands, ending segregation that kept blacks from playing the music they created to larger white audiences. In 1938, Goodman brought jazz to Carnegie Hall, and in 1962, he brought it to the Soviet Union, where it had not been heard in years.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | By Michael Kimmelman and Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Benny Goodman, the clarinetist whose big band first brought the sound of jazz to millions of listeners in the 1930s and who was proclaimed the "King of Swing," died yesterday in his Manhattan apartment of cardiac arrest. He was 77. He had been taking a nap on a couch and apparently died in his sleep, according to his housekeeper. The Goodman band, the most successful of all jazz orchestras, sparked the Big Band craze of the '30s and '40s. Mr. Goodman's long career was distinguished by several innovations: He became the first white band leader to feature blacks prominently when he hired Teddy Wilson to play piano on a tour in the summer of 1935.
NEWS
June 28, 1986
Your June 17 editorial "Long live the King of Swing" made me wistful and sad. About 10 years ago, I saw Benny Goodman at the Temple Music Festival, and he required no introduction, nor was one given. His band started to play, and he walked out a minute later and no one had to announce, "Ladies and gentlemen, here's Benny Goodman. " I think he must have been a very unassuming person. Whoever wrote your editorial really paid tribute and said it all with the last line: "Move over Gabriel, the King of Swing is coming.
NEWS
June 17, 1986
It was the summer of 1935, on a hot August night in the Depression era twilight between the wars. A 14-piece band of obscure musicians showed up at the Palomar Ballroom in Hollywood, Calif., to finish out a grueling 26-week cross-country tour of instantly forgotten one-night stands. Thinking it was their last engagement together, they kicked out the jams, and as they swung into "Sugar Foot Stomp," a roar burst spontaneously from the crowd, which stormed the bandstand. The crowd's delirium ignited the Swing Era of Big Band Jazz, and from that night forward band leader Benny Goodman was the King of Swing.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
"Working with Benny Goodman wasn't a job, it was an experience," said Frank Sinatra. "He treated me like a little sister. I will always love him and miss him very much," said Peggy Lee. Theirs were among the many tributes that poured in for jazz leader Benny Goodman, who died yesterday at 77. "He gave so much," vibraphonist Lionel Hampton said in New York. "He was the first one to integrate and put black and white together in his quartet and his organization. . . . It meant so much for him to have us play together.
NEWS
October 19, 2011
LOS ANGELES - Pete Rugolo, an Emmy- and Grammy-winning composer and arranger who worked with greats such as Miles Davis and Benny Goodman, has died. He was 95. A family spokeswoman said that Rugolo died Sunday in the Sherman Oaks area of Los Angeles. Rugolo was chief arranger for Stan Kenton's orchestra after World War II, helping develop its progressive jazz sound. He later was musical director for Capitol Records, where he signed Peggy Lee, Mel Torme and others.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BY HIS OWN admission, Russ Connor was something of a wild man in his youth. There was the time he and some buddies commandeered a trolley to drive them from dry Ocean City, N.J., to wet Somers Point for a night of intemperance. He once raced his Pontiac GTO full-out on an unopened section of the Atlantic City Expressway, not the safest venture even on a vacant road. His expenses and his caprices were paid for at least in part by the $20 weekly check he got from the government as a returning GI. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Donald Russell Connor, who went from his carefree years to the sober world of banking, working his way up to vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, a jazz buff who wrote four books on Benny Goodman and became pals with drummer Gene Krupa, died Wednesday at age 92. He was one of the original homeowners in Levittown.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren B. Goodman, 91, of Bala Cynwyd, an ice skater who won championships in the 1930s, died Thursday, March 14, of a heart attack while visiting his daughter in Los Angeles. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Goodman started skating at age 11 with skates he found in an attic. With the exception of two lessons from a professional, he was self-taught. In 1937, while attending West Philadelphia High School, he won the Middle Atlantic States Men's Junior Championships; in 1938, he won the Philadelphia District Men's Junior Championship; in 1939, he won the Men's Senior title at the Middle Atlantic Championships; and in 1940, he competed at the U.S. Championships in Cleveland, where he placed fourth in the Men's Senior Division.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
William F. Hyland, a New Jersey attorney general in the 1970s who argued the Karen Ann Quinlan "right-to-die" case before the state Supreme Court, fought back challenges to Atlantic City gaming in its nascence, and wailed on clarinet with Benny Goodman, died of complications of a stroke on Saturday, March 2, in Moorestown. He was 89, with a brimful resumé in public service. During a career exceeding 50 years, Mr. Hyland moved in and out of private practice. Those occasions often were commas in a lengthy list of Democratic Party posts, an elected office, and several gubernatorial appointments of increasing gravitas.
NEWS
October 19, 2011
LOS ANGELES - Pete Rugolo, an Emmy- and Grammy-winning composer and arranger who worked with greats such as Miles Davis and Benny Goodman, has died. He was 95. A family spokeswoman said that Rugolo died Sunday in the Sherman Oaks area of Los Angeles. Rugolo was chief arranger for Stan Kenton's orchestra after World War II, helping develop its progressive jazz sound. He later was musical director for Capitol Records, where he signed Peggy Lee, Mel Torme and others.
NEWS
July 9, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
HISTORICALLY, explosive pop-music hits like "The Twist" have rarely been created in a vacuum. Usually there's an abiding current, a big wave of interest in a style or three that numerous artists latch onto and ride for all its worth . . . until the next big craze comes along. In hindsight, 1960 can be seen as a year on the creative cusp, a time of optimism, experimentation and youthful frivolity inspired, in part, by the idealistic visions of presidential candidate (then president-elect)
NEWS
January 23, 2002 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Peggy Lee, the enduring and influential singer and composer who exuded a subtle, smoldering sexuality and whose hits "Fever" and "Is That All There Is" became standards, has died. She was 81. According to her daughter, Nicki Lee Foster, Lee died of a heart attack at her Los Angeles home on Monday night. A diabetic with a history of heart trouble, she underwent four angioplasty operations and double-bypass surgery in 1985. In 1998, she suffered a stroke that impaired her speech.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter Nero and the Philly Pops opened their 22d season Sunday at the Academy of Music with "Live! On the Air. " They might have called it "Nostalgia Time. " The theme of the concert was music you, or your parents or grandparents, used to hear during the glory days of radio. So, after "The Star Spangled Banner," beautifully sung by Katie Lacie (on the high notes I imagined I heard the sound of shattering crystal), the Popsters opened with a rousing rendition of "The William Tell Overture.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ben Greenblatt, 88, of Haverford, a swing pianist who played for intimate society parties from the Main Line to Hyannis Port and at inaugural balls for FDR and Richard Nixon, died Sunday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. For 40 years, Mr. Greenblatt played piano for the Meyer Davis Orchestra and often led the group himself. He played thousands of musical interludes - "Keys to Happiness" was one - on the radio from the 1930s into the 1960s, and he gave piano lessons to the children with Social Register names.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
The private lives of jazz musicians rarely seep into the gossip press, give or take a Miles Davis or an Andre Previn. Humdrum is not a category in the Down Beat polls. Two of the most exciting artists in the history of jazz are the subjects of recent biographies, and while these richly gifted Midwesterners were poles apart in terms of public adoration, they shared a propensity for rotten luck and alcoholic instability. And both of them were lightning rods for domestic strife. One, of course, does not judge a career on the number of bottles in the back alley or the number of tuxedos reduced to shreds by a tempestuous live-in inamorata.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1993 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The season-ending performance of the Pennsy Pops, like Winston Churchill's famous pudding, had no theme, but it was a tasty smorgasbord. You like classical? They give you classical. You like jazz? They give you jazz. You like big band, light opera, Broadway melodies, Latin rhythm, soft-and-mellow? Well, you get the idea, and so did the audience at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside on Friday night at the first of the three weekend performances. At the end, it gave the orchestra a prolonged standing ovation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|